Camp hantesa ecosystem needs assessment
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Camp Hantesa Ecosystem Needs Assessment. Presented by: Michael Edwards, Brendan Kelly, Mike Thompson, & Casey Hawes. www.hantesa.com. Introduction. Jungst & Sons Consultants. J. &. S. Jungst. Outline. Intoduction Current conditions Desired future conditions Management actions Summary

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Camp Hantesa Ecosystem Needs Assessment

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Camp hantesa ecosystem needs assessment

Camp Hantesa Ecosystem Needs Assessment

Presented by: Michael Edwards, Brendan Kelly, Mike Thompson, & Casey Hawes

www.hantesa.com


Introduction

Introduction


Jungst sons consultants

Jungst & Sons Consultants

J

&

S

Jungst


Outline

Outline

  • Intoduction

  • Current conditions

  • Desired future conditions

  • Management actions

  • Summary

  • Conclusion


General information

General Information

  • Member of Campfire Association

  • Summer camp since 1919

  • Four season recreational facility

  • 144 total acres

  • 100.4 forested acres


Topographic map of camp hantesa

Topographic Map of Camp Hantesa

www.terraserver.micrsoft.com


Purpose

Purpose

  • Assess current: conditions wildlife habitat unit values (HUV), woodland quality (WQR), recreation, & oak regeneration.

  • Emphases:

    • 1) recreation

    • 2) enhancement of native oak


Goals objectives

Goals & Objectives

  • Goals

    • Enhance native oak component

    • Increase passive and active recreation

  • Objectives

    • Increase basal area by 25% within 20 years

    • Improve recreation by 35% throughout forested area by 2025


Methods

Methods

  • Systematic sampling of 100.4 acres

  • 48 plots

    • Fixed radius

    • Point sampling

  • Assessment of factors critical to recreation, HUV, oak regeneration, & woodland quality.


Aerial photo camp hantesa

Aerial Photo: Camp Hantesa


Current conditions

Current Conditions


Wildlife habitat unit value huv

Wildlife Habitat Unit Value (HUV)

  • Assessed for

    • 1) tree squirrels

    • 2) forest game (white-tailed deer and wild turkey)

  • Factors assessed: food, cover, water, reproduction, weather, & human disturbance.

  • Average

    1) Tree Squirrels HUV=5.6 points

    2) Forest game HUV=5.3 points


Habitat unit value huv

Habitat Unit Value (HUV)

Source: Flood, Sangster, Sparrowe, Baskett 1977


Woodland quality rating wqr

Woodland Quality Rating (WQR)

  • Provides generalized idea of health for wooded area.

  • Primary factors: diversity, structure, fidelity, & introduced species.


Wqr scale

WQR Scale

  • Average of 11.5 WQR points

Source: Norris 1995


Tree regeneration

Tree Regeneration

  • No advanced oak regeneration found.

  • Large canopy prohibits understory growth.


Seedlings per acre

Seedlings per Acre


Recreational current conditions

Recreational Current Conditions

  • Area assessed for General Hiking, Primitive Camping, Wildlife Observation, & Horseback Riding.

  • Evaluation based on “Guidelines for Understanding and Determining Optimum Recreation Carrying Capacity (RCC)”. Source: (The Urban Research Development Corporation, 1977)


General hiking

General Hiking

  • Average capacity 14.1 groups/mile


General hiking1

General Hiking


Primitive camping

Primitive Camping

  • Average capacity of 27 Acres/campsite


Primitive camping1

Primitive Camping


Horseback riding

Horseback Riding

  • Average capacity of 5.9 groups/mile


Horseback riding1

Horseback Riding


Wildlife observation

Wildlife Observation

  • Average capacity of 3.3 people/acre


Wildlife observation1

Wildlife Observation


Desired future conditions

Desired Future Conditions


Desired future conditions1

Desired Future Conditions

  • Create areas of recreation throughout forested land having little/ no impact upon landscape.

  • Increase oak seedlings

  • Increase total oak population


Management actions for camp hantesa

Management Actions for Camp Hantesa


Possible management actions

Possible Management Actions


Guiding principles

Guiding Principles

  • Ecological: Humans inseparable from ecosystem.

  • Social: Human, physical, & biological ecosystem relationships are natural & intertwined.

  • Economic: Non-market & market goods based on human values.

    Source: (Kaufmann et. al. 1992; Salwasser & Pfister 1993; Task Force 1994)


Filtration process

Filtration Process

All Possible Management Actions

Guiding Principles

Feasible Management Actions


Recreational management actions

Recreational Management Actions

  • Installation of recreational facilities based upon plots with highest recreational carrying capacity.

    • Three campsites

    • Wildlife observation area

    • General hiking trail

    • Horseback riding trail


Rcc spatial representation

RCC Spatial Representation


Oak management actions through thinning

Oak Management Actions Through Thinning

  • Removal of specified species

  • Thinning overstory opens canopy for seedlings

  • Removal of undesirable oaks (UGS) post regeneration


Continued

Continued

  • Removal of basswood, ash, iron wood, hard maple.

    • Opens canopy

    • Reduces competition

    • Increase of oak sprouting potential


Percent basal area for oak

Percent Basal Area for Oak


Cost benefit of thinning present day

Cost & Benefit of Thinning:Present Day

  • Cost

    • 2 Fellers at 4 hours/Acre

    • $40/hour

  • Benefit

    • $165/cord of firewood


Benefits example equation

Benefits Example Equation

Thinning for basswood, ash, hardwood maple, & ironwood

1,100 cu ft/Acre/128 cu ft = 9 cords/Acre

9 cords/Acre x $165/cord= $1,500/Acre

100.4 Acres x $1,500/Acre= $150,600 total


Calculation of cost of thinning

Calculation of Cost of Thinning

2 Fellers x $40/hour x 4 hours/Acre = $320/Acre

$320/Acre x 100.4 Acres= $32,000 total cost


Present benefit cost ratio

Present Benefit/Cost Ratio

$150,600 benefit / $32,000 cost=

4.70Benefit/Cost Ratio

For every dollar invested there will be a return of $4.70.

Net revenue= $119,000


Cost of recreation

Cost of Recreation

  • Heavy chainsaw work

    • $40/ hour x 4 people= $160/ hour

    • $160/ hour x 80 hours= $12,800 total

  • Heavy hand cutting

    • $35/ hour x 4 people= $140/ hour

    • $140/ hour x 80 hours= $11,200 total

  • Total cost

    • $11,200 + $12,800= $24,000 total cost


Thinning net revenue recreation costs

Thinning Net Revenue & Recreation Costs

  • Thinning net revenue

    • $119,000

  • Recreation Costs

    • $24,000

  • $119,000 - $24,000= $95,000 total net revenue


Evaluation and adaptation of decisions

Evaluation and Adaptation of Decisions

  • Observe changes every 5 years

  • Make adjustment in plan if necessary

  • Re-evaluate conditions after 20 year period


Summary

Summary


Emphases objectives

Emphases & Objectives

  • Emphases

    • Enhance native oak component

    • Increase passive and active recreation

  • Objectives

    • Increase basal area by 25% within 20 years

    • Improve recreation by 35% throughout forested area by 2025


Desired rcc future conditions

Desired RCC Future Conditions

  • Create areas of recreation throughout the forested land that will have little to no impact upon the landscape.


Desired oak future conditions

Desired Oak Future Conditions

  • Increase oak seedlings

  • Increase total oak population


Rcc management recommendations

RCC Management Recommendations

  • Creation of recreational activities based upon plots with highest recreational carrying capacity

    • Three campsites

    • Wildlife observation area

    • General hiking trail

    • Horseback riding trail


Oak management recommendations

Oak Management Recommendations

  • Periodic removal of specified species

  • Thinning overstory opens canopy for seedlings

  • Removal of undesirable oaks (UGS) post regeneration


Management effects

Management Effects

  • Increased oak population

  • Increased oak regeneration

  • Improvement of recreational carrying capacity

  • Alternate source of income from new recreational opportunities and timber harvest

  • Optimal land use


Conclusions

Conclusions


Conclusions1

Conclusions

  • Camp Hantesa provides many opportunities for the public.

  • Maximized land usage and benefits provided with implementation of recommendations


Are there any questions

Are There Any Questions ?


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