model of explicit instruction
Download
Skip this Video
Download Presentation
Model Of Explicit Instruction

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 17

Model Of Explicit Instruction - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 537 Views
  • Uploaded on

Model Of Explicit Instruction. Gradual Release of Responsibility Model. Student. Modeling. Teacher’s gradual release of responsibility. Independence. Teacher. Guided Practice. Spires & Stone, 1989, after Pearson & Gallagher, 1983. Dependent Learning

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about ' Model Of Explicit Instruction ' - marisa


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
model of explicit instruction
Model Of Explicit Instruction

Gradual Release of Responsibility Model

Student

Modeling

Teacher’s gradual release of responsibility

Independence

Teacher

Guided Practice

Spires & Stone, 1989, after Pearson & Gallagher, 1983

slide3
Dependent Learning
    • Direct Instruction that establishes purpose, models thinking, demonstrates skills, and teaches for metacognition.
    • Must consists of a Focused Lesson
focused lesson
Focused Lesson
  • Clearly establish a purpose and model their own thinking.
  • Provide students with information about the ways in which a skilled reader, writer, or thinker processes information.
  • Almost always done with the whole class and typically last around 15 minutes (depending on the age group)
clearly establishing a purpose
Clearly establishing a purpose:
  • A clear, general statement of learner outcomes,
  • Related to an identified problem and needs assessment
  • Achievable through instruction
what to look for
What to Look For
  • The teacher establishes the purpose for the lesson.
  • Both content and language goals are established.
  • The teacher uses “I” statements to model thinking.
  • Questioning is used to scaffold instruction, not to interrogate students.
  • The lesson includes a decision frame for when to use the skill or strategy.
  • The lesson builds metacognitive awareness, especially indicators of success
  • Focus lessons move to guided instruction, not immediately to independent learning
slide7
Dependent Learning
    • Direct Instruction that establishes purpose, models thinking, demonstrates skills, and teaches for metacognition.
  • Shared Learning
    • Guided Instruction and tasks that require joint intellectual effort, such as jigsaws, case studies, group projects, numbered heads together, etc.
shared learning two parts
Shared Learning: Two Parts
  • Guided Instruction
    • Almost always done with small, purposeful groups, which are composed based on students’ performance on formative assessments.
    • Consist of students who share a common instructional need that the teacher can address.
    • Ideal time to differentiate based on needs
what to look for1
What to Look For
  • Small-group arrangements are evident.
  • Grouping changes throughout the semester.
  • The teacher plays an active role in guided instruction, not just circulating and assisting individual students.
  • A dialogue occurs between students and the teacher as they begin to apply the skill or strategy.
  • The teacher uses cues and prompts to scaffold understanding when a student makes an error an does not immediately tell the student the correct answer.
shared learning two parts1
Shared Learning: Two Parts

1. Guided Instruction

2. Collaborative Learning

  • Key is the requirement for independent products from the group collaboration.
  • It is not the time to introduce new information to students.
  • Should be a time for students to apply information in novel situations or to engage in a spiral review of previous knowledge.
  • Critical to the success of the gradual release of responsibility model of instruction
what to look for2
What to Look For
  • Small-group arrangements are evident.
  • Grouping changes throughout the semester.
  • The teacher has modeled concepts that students need to complete collaborative tasks.
  • Students have received guided instruction of the concepts needed to complete collaborative tasks.
slide12
Dependent Learning
    • Direct Instruction that establishes purpose, models thinking, demonstrates skills, and teaches for metacognition.
  • Shared Learning
    • Guided Instruction and tasks that require joint intellectual effort, such as jigsaws, case studies, group projects, numbered heads together, etc.
  • Independent Learning
    • Tasks that are meaningful, experiential, and relevant, which the student completes on his or her own.
independent learning
Independent Learning
  • Students should not be asked to do unfamiliar tasks - tasks for which they have not had instruction - independently.
  • Too many students are asked to complete independent tasks in the absence of good instruction.
what to look for3
What to Look For
  • Students have received focus lessons, guided instruction, and collaborative learning experiences related to concepts needed to complete independent tasks.
  • Independent tasks extend beyond practice to application and extension of new knowledge.
  • The teacher meets with individual students for conferencing about the independent learning tasks.
complete model
Complete Model
  • Focus Lessons: Establishing the lesson’s purpose and then modeling your own thinking for students.
  • Guided Instruction: Strategically using prompts, cues, and questions to facilitate students’ increased responsibility for task completion.
  • Collaborative Learning: Enabling students to discuss and negotiate with one another to create independent work, not simply one project.
  • Independent Tasks: Requiring students to use their previous knowledge to create new and authentic products.
ad