The Living Labs  in the  EU Innovation Policy

The Living Labs in the EU Innovation Policy PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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. Europe represents 32% of the world ICT market (demand) but only supplies 22% of the world marketIn Europe, businesses created after 1985 represent only ~15% of total R

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The Living Labs in the EU Innovation Policy

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2. Europe represents 32% of the world ICT market (demand) but only supplies 22% of the world market In Europe, businesses created after 1985 represent only ~15% of total R&D expenditure Only 5% of the European companies which are now in the world top-1000 in terms of market capitalization were created after 1980 In Europe, private investments in R&D is ~35 B€/year, 60% lower than the US Yearly investments by venture capital and business angels is ~5 B€, against 30 B€ in the US In the EU, <2 B€/year is spent on pre-commercial procurement of ICT R&D (US: ~50 B€/year) Relatively few world-recognised ICT poles of excellence in Europe Facts & Figures

3. Open Innovation for Services Open innovation captures creativity of users Open innovation increases the social and intellectual capital of the community Open innovation sites (e.g. Living Labs) are the „site“ for this creative commons capital Network of innovation environments enables development of functional interoperability of eServices Network enables pan-European solutions eServices “best suited“ for open innovation environments in real world settings: Need for high dynamics, multidisciplinarity Different maturity levels of technology and society merging New co-creation processes of eServices; user-driven configurations

4. European Clusters of World Classe Communication on the role of clusters in Innovation and Competitiveness Memorandum on European Clusters Launch of a pilot initiative Coordination UE – MS – Regions European Cluster Policy Group

5. Open Innovation in EC DG-INFSO Emerging and growing, both on public and private sector Strategic Industrial Group established in DG Information Society and Media to advise in EU policy and strategy (IBM, Philips, Intel, HP, SAP, Orange, BT, Nokia..) Much in line with Lead Market Initiative of the EU Research programme open/neutral European Network of Living Labs (ENoLL) I2010 policy initiative Support from the EU Presidencies Three Waves

6. Open Innovation in EC Towards world-class clusters in EU (ENTR) Design as a driver of user-centred innovation (ENTR) Communication on Future of Transport (TREN) OISPG to advise INFSO in EU policy and strategy (IBM, Philips, Intel, HP, SAP, Orange, BT, Nokia..) ICT FP7 WP2009-2010: user-driven open innovation European Network of Living Labs (ENoLL) I2010 policy initiative Support from the EU Presidencies Three Waves

7. In launching the partnership for growth and jobs as a new start for the Lisbon strategy, the 2005 Spring European Council called knowledge and innovation the engines of sustainable growth and stated that it is essential to build a fully inclusive information society, based on the widespread use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in public services, SMEs and households. Information and communication technologies are a powerful driver of growth and employment. A quarter of EU GDP growth and 40% of productivity growth are due to ICT. Differences in economic performances between industrialised countries are largely explained by the level of ICT investment, research, and use, and by the competitiveness of information society and media industries[1]. ICT services, skills, media and content are a growing part of the economy and society. In recent years, ICT developments have gained pace to arrive at the threshold of massive growth in information society and media, made possible by widespread fast communications, connecting multiple devices. Traditional content (such as films, video, music) is now available in digital formats, and new services that are ‘born digital’, such as interactive software, are emerging. The digital convergence of information society and media services, networks and devices is finally becoming an everyday reality: ICT will become smarter, smaller, safer, faster, always connected and easier to use, with content moving to three-dimensional multimedia formats. Proactive policies are needed to respond to the fundamental changes in technology. Digital convergence requires policy convergence and a willingness to adapt regulatory frameworks where needed so they are consistent with the emerging digital economy. The Commission proposes a new strategic framework, i2010 – European Information Society 2010, laying out broad policy orientations. It promotes an open and competitive digital economy and emphasises ICT as a driver of inclusion and quality of life. A key element of the renewed Lisbon partnership for growth and jobs, i2010 will build towards an integrated approach to information society and audio-visual media policies in the EU. Drawing on a comprehensive analysis of information society challenges and drawing on wide stakeholder consultation on previous initiatives and instruments[2], the Commission proposes three priorities for Europe’s information society and media policies: i) The completion of a Single European Information Space which promotes an open and competitive internal market for information society and media; ii) Strengthening Innovation and Investment in ICT research to promote growth and more and better jobs; iii) Achieving an Inclusive European Information Society that promotes growth and jobs in a manner that is consistent with sustainable development and that prioritises better public services and quality of life. The following sections outline the objectives of i2010 and the key activities, which are fully integrated and consistent with the new Lisbon governance cycle. [1] The services of the information society and media industries were already described in the 1998 Green Paper on convergence of the telecommunications, media and information technology sectors and the implications for regulation towards an information society approach (COM(97)623) and, taking into account new developments, in the 2003 Communication on the Future of European Regulatory Audiovisual Policy (COM(2003)784). These services reflect the convergence now taking place between electronic communications services, information society services and broadcasting services and the emergence of new content services resulting therefrom. [2] I.e. the eEurope initiatives and the communication on the future of European audiovisual regulatory policy, COM(2003) 784 In launching the partnership for growth and jobs as a new start for the Lisbon strategy, the 2005 Spring European Council called knowledge and innovation the engines of sustainable growth and stated that it is essential to build a fully inclusive information society, based on the widespread use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in public services, SMEs and households. Information and communication technologies are a powerful driver of growth and employment. A quarter of EU GDP growth and 40% of productivity growth are due to ICT. Differences in economic performances between industrialised countries are largely explained by the level of ICT investment, research, and use, and by the competitiveness of information society and media industries[1]. ICT services, skills, media and content are a growing part of the economy and society. In recent years, ICT developments have gained pace to arrive at the threshold of massive growth in information society and media, made possible by widespread fast communications, connecting multiple devices. Traditional content (such as films, video, music) is now available in digital formats, and new services that are ‘born digital’, such as interactive software, are emerging. The digital convergence of information society and media services, networks and devices is finally becoming an everyday reality: ICT will become smarter, smaller, safer, faster, always connected and easier to use, with content moving to three-dimensional multimedia formats. Proactive policies are needed to respond to the fundamental changes in technology. Digital convergence requires policy convergence and a willingness to adapt regulatory frameworks where needed so they are consistent with the emerging digital economy. The Commission proposes a new strategic framework, i2010 – European Information Society 2010, laying out broad policy orientations. It promotes an open and competitive digital economy and emphasises ICT as a driver of inclusion and quality of life. A key element of the renewed Lisbon partnership for growth and jobs, i2010 will build towards an integrated approach to information society and audio-visual media policies in the EU. Drawing on a comprehensive analysis of information society challenges and drawing on wide stakeholder consultation on previous initiatives and instruments[2], the Commission proposes three priorities for Europe’s information society and media policies: i) The completion of a Single European Information Space which promotes an open and competitive internal market for information society and media; ii) Strengthening Innovation and Investment in ICT research to promote growth and more and better jobs; iii) Achieving an Inclusive European Information Society that promotes growth and jobs in a manner that is consistent with sustainable development and that prioritises better public services and quality of life. The following sections outline the objectives of i2010 and the key activities, which are fully integrated and consistent with the new Lisbon governance cycle.

14. Living Labs related EU projects Examples of industrial/business participation

16. Research Infrastructure DG RTD Capacities Programme INFRA-2008-1.1.2.11 New Work programme under definition Next Call in 2010

18. Competitiveness & Innovation Programme DG ENTR Objective 4.1 4 Thematic Networks Sharing experience on ICT initiatives for SMEs 4.1 b - Experience sharing in terms of user acceptance of innovative solutions such as Living Labs, experience research centres and other similar initiatives Call open 25/05/2007 close 23/10/2007 Evaluation 19-22/11/2007 CO-LLABS : LL + SME-innovation Current call : closing on June 2nd 2009

20. Regions for Economic Change (RFEC) DG REGIO Interreg IVc Programme adopted on 11/09/2007 Priority theme 2.2 “Bringing innovative ideas to the market more quickly” supporting the creation and development of clusters, networks, incubators and Living Labs Programme Monitoring Committees composed of the 27 Member States Call open on 30-10-08 close on 30-01-09 Evaluation results before Summer

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