Punctuation it s kind of important
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Punctuation- It’s kind of important  PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Punctuation- It’s kind of important . End Marks Commas Semicolons Colons . Commas. Use commas to separate items in a series. Use commas to separate two or more adjectives preceding a noun.

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Punctuation- It’s kind of important 

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Punctuation it s kind of important

Punctuation- It’s kind of important 

End Marks

Commas

Semicolons

Colons


Commas

Commas

Use commas to separate items in a series.

Use commas to separate two or more adjectives preceding a noun.

HINT: If you can say the word and between the adjectives and the sentence makes sense, you need a comma.

Use a comma before a coordinating conjunction (for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so= FANBOYS)when it joins independent clauses in a compound sentence.


Interrupters

Interrupters

  • Use commas to set off an expression that interrupts a sentence.

  • Use commas to set off nonessential participial phrases and nonessential subordinate clauses.

    • Nonessential- means it is not needed to understand the basic meaning of the sentence

    • Ex: This small turtle, crossing the street slowly, was in danger.

    • Ex: All farmers growing the new hybrid corn should have a good harvest.


Interrupters1

Interrupters

  • Use commas to set off words of direct address.

    • EX: Do you know, Bob, when the team is leaving?

  • Use commas to set off parenthetical expressions.

    • EX: Leah, I believe, will have the highest average at the end of the year.

    • EX: I believe Leah will have the highest average at the end of the year. (Why don’t I have commas??)


Introductory words phrases clauses

Introductory words, phrases, clauses

  • Set off words such as well, oh, why, yes, no when they come at the beginning of a sentence.

  • Use a comma after introductory prepositional, participial, and infinitive phrases.

    • EX: In the morning, they are going hiking.

    • EX: Studying all night long, Bob finally drifted off to sleep.

    • EX: To perform well in games, be sure to come to practice each day.

    • EX: To perform well in games is Bob’s goal.


Conventions

Conventions

  • Use commas to separate items in dates and addresses.

    • My old address was 250 Dolphin Lane, Miami, FL 32523.

    • Dear Bob,

    • Friday, June 1, 2012


Semicolons

Semicolons

  • Use between independent clauses when they are not joined by FANBOYS.

  • Use between independent clauses when they are joined by a word other than FANBOYS.

    • EX: English was Lou’s hardest subject; accordingly, he gave it more time than any other subject.

  • Use to separate independent clauses joined by FANBOYS if the clauses already contain commas.

    • EX: Our strongest defensive players are Carlos, Will, and Jared; and Kareem and Matt are excellent on offense.


So how do i use this

So how do I use this???

  • Understanding comma rules and semicolon rules, you can avoid run-on sentences in your writing.

  • 3 ways to avoid run-ons:

    • Use a comma with a FANBOYS

    • Use a semicolon

    • Split into 2 separate sentences


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