Transition to a Tobacco Free Campus: Cigarette Smoking Trends Among IC Undergraduates
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 13

Background PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 107 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Transition to a Tobacco Free Campus: Cigarette Smoking Trends Among IC Undergraduates Amanda Cheetham , Christie Larrabee & Divine Sebuharara HPPE/ESS Dr. Srijana Bajracharya & Dr. Miranda Kaye. Background.

Download Presentation

Background

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Background

Transition to a Tobacco Free Campus: Cigarette Smoking Trends Among IC UndergraduatesAmanda Cheetham, Christie Larrabee& Divine SebuhararaHPPE/ESSDr. SrijanaBajracharya& Dr. Miranda Kaye


Background

Background

  • Cigarette Smoking associated with CVD, respiratory issues, various types of cancer, and increases the risk for several other conditions.

  • Over 7,000 chemicals in SHS and 69 proven to cause cancer.

  • Individuals exposed to SHS smoke before age 25 are more likely to develop lung cancer as opposed to those who are first exposed after age 25.

  • 14.3% of undergraduate students have smoked in the last 30 days.

American Cancer Society, 2013; Asomaning et al., 2007; CDC, 2012a; NCHA, 2012


Background1

Background

  • More than 500 colleges are already smoke free.

  • Compliance with these policies is a challenge - a trend seen nationally and internationally.

  • Smoke free policies have been found to decrease smoking rates among undergraduate students.

Fallin, 2013; Hahn, 2010


Research question

Research Question

  • What variables most significantly predict cigarette use among undergraduate students?

  • Predictions:

    • Students’ perceptions of peer smoking habits will predict their smoking behaviors.

    • Students who report receiving information from the College regarding tobacco use, will report smoking less frequently.


Background

Methods

  • American College Health Association National College Health Assessment (ACHA-NCHA)

  • Random Participant Selection: E-mail invitation sent to 3,578 randomly selected full-time undergraduate students

    • Response rate: 34.3% (n = 1222)


Background

Demographics


Methods

Methods

  • The following questions were used from the survey:

    • “Within the last 30 days, on how many days did you use cigarettes”

    • “Within the last 30 days, how often do you think the typical student at your school used cigarettes”

    • “Have you received information on tobacco use from your college or university?”

    • “What is your gender?”

    • “What is your year in school?”

    • “Where do you currently live?”

    • “Within the last 12 months, have you participated in organized college athletics at the varsity level?”


Background

Results


Background

Results

  • Smoker Profile

  • 72% male (80 of 111)

  • 86% non-athletes (96 of 112)

  • 75% live on campus (84 of 112)

  • 35% are sophomore students (38 of 110)

  • 67% (74 of 111) of smokers report not receiving information from IC about tobacco.


Background

Results

Current residence (β = .11), varsity athlete status (β = -.11), gender (β = .08) and information received about tobacco (β = .11) significantly predicted cigarette use among participants.

Perceptions of tobacco use (β = .02) and year in school (β = .01) were not significant predictors of cigarette use.

All variables explain 4.4% of difference in cigarette use in the last 30 days.

F(6, 1159) = 8.84, p < .001


Discussion

Discussion

  • Neither prediction was supported:

    • Perceptions NOT a predictor of smoking

    • IC students are not influenced by subjective norm.

    • Information received predicts smoking

    • Explanation may be that smokers are more likely to recall receiving information that pertains to a behavior they engage in.


Conclusions

Conclusions

  • Tobacco information distributed by college is reaching the population but not having the desired effect.

  • Intervention should be based on:

    • Theory of Reasoned Action and Planned Behavior,

      • Perceived control

    • Diffusion Theory of Innovations

    • Social Marketing Theory


References

References

American Cancer Society. (2013). Secondhand smoke. Retrieved from http://www.cancer.org/cancer/cancercauses/tobaccocancer/secondhand-smoke

American College Health Association. American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment II: Reference Group Executive Summary Spring 2012. Hanover, MD: American College Health Association; 2012. 

Asomaning, K. Miller, D. P., Liu, G., Wain, J. C., Lynch, T. J., Su, L., & Christiani, D. C., (2007). Second hand smoke, age of exposure and lung cancer risk. Lung Cancer, 61, 13-20.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2012a). Health effects of cigarette smoking. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/fact_sheets/health_effects/effects_cig_smoking/#cancer

Fallin, A., Johnson, A.O., Riker, C., Cohen, E., Rayens, M.K., Hahn, E.J. (2011). An intervention to increase compliance with a tobacco-free university policy. The Science of Lifestyle Change, 27(3): 162-169.

Hahn, E.J., Rayens, M.K., Ridner, S.L., Butler, K.M., Zhang, M., & Staten, R.R. (2010). Smoke-free laws and smoking and drinking among college students. Journal of Community Health, 35: 503-511.


  • Login