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Sarah and Angelina Grimké. By Kendall Smith and Cooper Kwiatkowski. Biography. American antislavery crusaders, women’s rights advocates Born in S.C. in 1792 (Sarah) and 1805 (Angelina) Supported abolition, women’s suffrage when young Raised by slave-owner among 14 children

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sarah and angelina grimk

Sarah and Angelina Grimké

By Kendall Smith and Cooper Kwiatkowski

biography
Biography
  • American antislavery crusaders, women’s rights advocates
  • Born in S.C. in 1792 (Sarah) and 1805 (Angelina)
  • Supported abolition, women’s suffrage when young
  • Raised by slave-owner among 14 children
  • Father refused to educate them
  • Girls taught themselves from family library
more biography
More Biography
  • Moved to P.A., then N.J.
  • Became Quakers
  • Lectured about slavery and women’s rights
  • Expelled from Society of Friends
  • Ran boarding school
  • Angelina married abolitionist Theodore Dwight Weld
  • Died 1873 (Sarah) and 1879 (Angelina) in M.A.
abolition and women s rights
Abolition and Women’s Rights
  • Supported freedom of slaves, suffrage for women
  • Movements popular in North, hated in South
contributions to women s rights and abolition
Contributions to Women’s Rights and Abolition
  • Angelina wrote letter to William Lloyd Garrison
  • Published in abolitionist newspaper, The Liberator
  • Angelina wrote “An Appeal to the Christian Women of the South,” opposing slavery
  • Sarah wrote “An Epistle to the Clergy of the Southern States”
  • Exposed ministry’s cruelty toward slaves
  • Toured 67 cities in Northeast
more contributions to women s rights and abolition
More Contributions to Women’s Rights and Abolition
  • Part of American Anti-Slavery society
  • Addressed small groups of women in private homes
  • Grew into appearances before large mixed audiences
  • Angelina wrote “Appeal to the Women of the Nominally Free States”
  • Angelina wrote “Letters on the Equality of the Sexes and the Condition of Woman”
  • Collaborated with Weld on “Slavery As It Is: Testimony of a Thousand Witnesses”
effects of contributions
Effects of Contributions
  • Spread awareness
  • First women to testify in legislature concerning African-American rights
  • Angelina first woman to address mixed audience
  • Sarah wrote nation’s first feminist tract
  • First public slavery debate between man and woman
  • Influenced feminist leaders Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Harriet Jane Robinson
primary sources
Primary Sources
  • Grimke, Angelina Emily. "Appeal to the Christian Women of the South." Appeal to the Christian Women of the South (1836): n. pag. Uncle Tom\'s Cabin & American Culture. Web. 8 Mar. 2012. http://utc.iath.virgina.edu/abolitn/      abesaegat.html.
  • Grimke, A. E. "Prejudice." Letters to Catherine E. Beecher, In Reply to An Essay on Slavery and Abolitionism, Addressed to A. E. Grimke 7 (1838): n. pag.      Print.
secondary sources
Secondary Sources
  • Snodgrass, Mary Ellen. “Grimké, Sarah (1792-1873) and Grimké, Angelina (1805-1879).” Encyclopedia of Feminist Literature. New York: Facts On File, Inc., 2006. American Women’s history Online. Facts On File, Inc. 7 Mar 2012. http://www.fofweb.com/activelink2.asp?ItemID=WE42&iPin=ELF227&SingleRecord=True
  • “People and Ideas: Angelina and Sarah Grimké.” God in America. WGBH Educational Foundation, 17 10 2010. Web. 7 Mar 2012. http://www.pbs.org/godinamerica/people/angelina-grimke.html
  • “Sarah Grimké and Angelina Grimké Weld.” Women Working, 1800-1930. Harvard College, n.d. Web. 7 Mar 2012. http://ocp.hul.harvard.edu/ww/grimke.html.
  • “Angelina and Sarah Grimké: Abolitionist Sisters.” History Now. The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, 2009. Web. 7 03 2012. http://www.gilderlehrman.org/historynow/09_2005/historian3.php
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