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Structuring Co-Teaching for Engagement and Success. UNITED ActS. Act 1: Margo & Marcus.

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act 1 margo marcus
Act 1: Margo & Marcus

When Margo and Marcus began co-teaching, they were similar to Dave and Diana in their actions and intentions. Margo planned and taught the lesson, Marcus assisted. Their classroom was pretty standard. Though the students learned, there seemed to be little advantage to having two trained educators in the room beyond offering additional assistance to students.

Both Margo and Marcus knew it could be better, but they were unsure where to begin. What could they do to make the most of their classroom and their collaborative effort ? How could they combine their individual work ethics, experience, and expertise to create something great?

The prospects and possibilities were exciting to both of them.

slide3

Marcus had an idea, and although he was a little uncomfortable bringing it up to Margo, he truly believed they could be a stronger team. More importantly, he felt they could make a greater difference for their students. He decided to bring up the subject.

later that day
Later that day …

Margo and Marcus met. Margo brought information on the Team-Based Cycle of Instruction, and Marcus came prepared to share strategies for differentiating instruction. Together they reviewed the information and resources.

As they examined the purpose of each stage of the Cycle, they realized the strength of their partnership. They gained an even greater appreciation for each other’s expertise and a renewed excitement for teaching their next lesson. They were encouraged to think that they could in fact improve their students’ academic learning time through their combined efforts.

Click through this presentation to learn more about the Team-Based Cycle of Instruction and other tools that can help you maximize your co-teaching partnership.

team based cycle of instruction tbci
Team-Based Cycle of Instruction (TBCI)

The six-stage Team-Based Cycle of Instruction provides a consistent structure for organizing and delivering instruction. Other benefits include:

Predictability so students and co-teachers know what to expect

Guidance for co-teachers in their shared roles during instruction

Support for students to follow routines successfully

Better coordination and shared effort between co-teachers

Sharing teaching routines as co-teachers maximizes instructional efficiency and promotes increased academic learning time – the portion of time students work on academic tasks and meet with success.

stage 1 set up
STAGE 1: SET UP

PURPOSE:

Facilitate students to be ready, organized, and prepared to learn

Stimulate student interest and activate prior knowledge

Review the purpose of the lesson and instructional objectives

Ensure IEP accommodations are provided

WHAT IT LOOKS LIKE IN A CO-TAUGHT CLASSROOM:

stage 2 presentation
STAGE 2: PRESENTATION

PURPOSE:

Deliver lesson content using a complement of strategies including cooperative learning, multimedia resources, modeling, hands-on and interactive activities

Differentiate tasks to meet the learning needs of diverse student populations *

Check for understanding frequently throughout the presentation to ensure that all students are achieving the lesson objective and gaining content knowledge/skills

WHAT IT LOOKS LIKE IN A CO-TAUGHT CLASSROOM:

* Use helpful resources such as the Class Profile Matrix (CPM) Resource Guide when planning lessons to ensure differentiated instruction that meets the needs of diverse student populations.

stage 3 learning together
STAGE 3: LEARNING TOGETHER

PURPOSE:

Facilitate group/team practice

Use flexible grouping structures and cooperative learning teams to practice application of concepts and develop skills

Guide and assist students to ensure active participation of all group members

WHAT IT LOOKS LIKE IN A CO-TAUGHT CLASSROOM:

Note the benefits of peer-learning:

  • increased academic achievement  improved mutual concern  increased goal attainment
  •  higher quality discussions  equal status ranking among all students
stage 4 just for me
STAGE 4: JUST FOR ME

PURPOSE:

Structure individual practice to apply new understandings and skills

Differentiate tasks to meet the learning needs of diverse student populations

Provide exercises within the range of success for students

WHAT IT LOOKS LIKE IN A CO-TAUGHT CLASSROOM:

stage 5 assessment
STAGE 5: ASSESSMENT

PURPOSE:

Review work from previous stages

Differentiate tasks to meet the needs of diverse student populations

Gather data and evaluate progress of individuals, small groups, and whole class

WHAT IT LOOKS LIKE IN A CO-TAUGHT CLASSROOM:

stage 6 wrap up
STAGE 6: WRAP UP

PURPOSE:

Facilitate organization of resources and preparation for transitions

Facilitate student reflection on individual, team, and whole class performance (called processing)

Ensure all students are prepared for homework and extension activities

WHAT IT LOOKS LIKE IN A CO-TAUGHT CLASSROOM:

later that day1
Later that day …

Marcus shared the Class Profile Matrix and CPM Resource guide, which added to the discussion of meeting their students’ needs. Margo suggested that they revisit a few of the co-teaching models they learned about in a workshop last spring.

Though Margo and Marcus were well on their way to becoming a high performing co-teaching team, this afternoon’s discussion seemed to propel them even farther.

Click through the last few slides to review or familiarize yourself with the Class Profile Matrix and four specific co-teaching models.

tbci class profile matrix cpm
TBCI &CLASS PROFILE MATRIX (CPM)

The Class Profile Matrix (CPM) was developed to help teachers monitor and implement required accommodations for students with disabilities in general education classes. Used in instructional planning, the CPM guides discussions between general and special educators and promotes success among all students.

The CPM Resource Guide provides research-based and respected practices in the field of education. With this information readily accessible, teachers are better prepared to design lessons that use scaffolds, aids, and accommodations to meet the needs of diverse student populations.

A sampling of techniques from the CPM Resource Guide is available in the callout box located to the right of this presentation in the ELC.

  • When designing your instruction consider:
    • What strategies and tools will make your content most accessible and engaging for all your students?
    • How will you build on the students’ strengths to teach the content?
tbci co teaching models
TBCI &CO-TEACHING MODELS

Leaders in the field of education identify various instructional models for helping co-teachers coordinate their efforts. Boundless Learning considers four specific co-teaching models:

PARALLEL TEACHING

STATION TEACHING

ALTERNATIVE TEACHING

TEAM TEACHING

Friend, Marilyn (2008). Co-Teach! A handbook for creating and sustaining effective classroom partnerships in inclusive schools. Greensboro, NC: Marilyn Friend, Inc.

Villa, R.A., Thousand, J.S., Nevin, A.I. (2008). A guide to co-teaching: Practical tips for facilitating student learning. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

tbci co teaching models1
TBCI &CO-TEACHING MODELS
  • When choosing a co-teaching model consider:
    • Student needs
    • Lesson objectives
    • Teachers’ areas of expertise
  • STATION TEACHING
  • Co-teachers divide content into segments and establish separate learning stations
  • Each teacher delivers a segment of the content at separate stations and students rotate from station to station
  • Teachers contribute equally and offer their individual areas of expertise
  • Reduces student:teacher ratio and promotes more interaction for learning
  • Requires attention to timing
  • PARALLEL TEACHING
  • Divide students into two groups
  • Co-teachers present the same content to the smaller groups
  • Increases opportunities for student participation and involvement
  • Requires similar pacing of instruction
  • Requires that both teachers are qualified and comfortable teaching the content
tbci co teaching models2
TBCI &CO-TEACHING MODELS
  • ALTERNATIVE TEACHING
  • One teacher manages a large group of students while the other teacher works with a smaller group for a specific instructional task or purpose
  • Allows for intense, small group instruction as needed
  • Used for enrichment, pre-teaching, reteaching, assessment, etc.
  • Provides personalized instruction and interaction
  • NOTE: Vary the students in the small groups and ensure that everyone participates in the small group experience at some point. This prevents attaching a stigma to specific students.
  • TEAMTEACHING
  • Both teachers participate in presenting content to the whole class
  • Allows both teachers to model quality interpersonal and team interactions
  • Allows both teachers to blend their teaching styles and expertise
  • Requires high level of trust and timing for cohesive content delivery
  • Use in conjunction with other teaching models that maximize the availability of two teachers to reduce the student:teacher ratio through smaller group instruction
tbci shared roles a final note
TBCI &SHARED ROLES: A Final Note

Co-teaching involves a partnership of interdependence – everyone plays a role and all roles are important. Therefore, everyone plays an important role. The Team-Based Cycle of Instruction prompts dialogue between co-teachers to formally examine their roles throughout an entire instructional period and select tasks that maintain equal status between them. Wherever you are in your development as co-teachers, it is expected that both teachers will contribute their best each day, fulfill their roles, meet their responsibilities, and help the team accomplish its goals of maintaining high expectations and boosting achievement for all students in the co-taught classroom.

Return to the ELC and complete the remaining sections of this session. Additional resources are available in the callout box located to the right of this presentation in the ELC.

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