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Outdoor Safety NOONE GETS HURT. Unit 2: Forest Safety. Lesson 1: Forest Safety Terminology Lesson 2: Environmental Hazards and Accident Prevention Lesson 3: First Aid. Lesson 1: Forest Safety Terminology. Forest Safety Terms

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Outdoor safety noone gets hurt

Outdoor SafetyNOONE GETS HURT.


Unit 2 forest safety

Unit 2: Forest Safety

  • Lesson 1: Forest Safety Terminology

  • Lesson 2: Environmental Hazards and Accident Prevention

  • Lesson 3: First Aid


Lesson 1 forest safety terminology

Lesson 1: Forest Safety Terminology

  • Forest Safety Terms

    Accident: any sudden or unintentional event that causes injury or property damage.

    Antiseptic: a substance such as alcohol, iodine, or hydrogen peroxide applied to prevent infection.


Lesson 1 forest safety terminology1

Lesson 1: Forest Safety Terminology

Anesthetic: a substance used to stop pain or itching.

Laceration: a cut.

Wound: an injury caused by cutting, stabbing, breaking, etc.

Habitat: the unit area of environment where animals and plants naturally live and grow.


Lesson 1 forest safety terminology2

Lesson 1: Forest Safety Terminology

Heat Cramps: caused by loss of salt resulting in muscular pains and spasms.

Heat Exhaustion: victim feels weak, dizzy, sweaty, nauseated, pale, or has cramps after being in the sun.

Heat Stroke: victim has extremely high body temperature and a failure of the sweating mechanism; can be life threatening.


Lesson 1 forest safety terminology3

Lesson 1: Forest Safety Terminology

Safety: the action or condition of being safe; free from danger, risk, or injury.

First-Aid: the immediate, temporary care given to the victim of an accident or sudden illness until the services of a physician can be obtained.

Hypothermia: below normal body temperature usually due to over exposure of low temperatures.


Lesson 2 environmental hazards and accident prevention

Lesson 2: Environmental Hazards and Accident Prevention

  • Environmental Hazards in the forest

    A. Heat and Dehydration

    • Hot temperatures cause burns, cramps, exhaustion, and heat strokes.

      B. Insects

    • Generally not life threatening, but annoying during the spring, summer, and fall.


Lesson 2 environmental hazards and accident prevention1

Lesson 2: Environmental Hazards and Accident Prevention

C. Wildlife

  • Most wildlife will avoid humans and most are not threats; poisonous snakes are a serious danger.

    D. Topographic Hazards

  • Such as uneven ground, holes, rotten limbs, and dead trees. Sprains, fractures, and other injuries are common occurrences.


Lesson 2 environmental hazards and accident prevention2

Lesson 2: Environmental Hazards and Accident Prevention

E. Plants

  • Some plants to avoid would be poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac.

  • Some plants to be mindful of are briars, trees with thorns such as the honey locust, and trees with prickly leaves such as the American holly


Lesson 2 environmental hazards and accident prevention3

Lesson 2: Environmental Hazards and Accident Prevention

  • The best safety factor in the forest is the ability to recognize dangerous situations. Some of these factors are:

    A. Dead snags or limbs hung up in the canopy that could fall on you

    B. Stump holes and old wells

    C. Bluffs or sudden drop-offs

    D. Deep ponds or creeks

    E. Loose rocks or soil


Lesson 2 environmental hazards and accident prevention4

Lesson 2: Environmental Hazards and Accident Prevention

F. Low-hanging limbs

Note: Always be aware of your surroundings; especially the ground directly in front of your line of sight

  • Many accidents occur due to negligence of an individual or group that does not pay attention to hazards around them, is distracted by someone else, is thinking about something other than the job at hand, or indulges in pure carelessness.


Lesson 2 environmental hazards and accident prevention5

Lesson 2: Environmental Hazards and Accident Prevention

  • We can eliminate most of the these hazardous situations by:

    A. Stay alert with your mind on the job at hand.

    B. Conduct yourself in a safe manner; no horseplay.

    C. Actively look for potential hazards.

    D. Be aware of people around you and what they are doing.

    E. Use the proper tools for the job.


Lesson 2 environmental hazards and accident prevention6

Lesson 2: Environmental Hazards and Accident Prevention

F. Know the safety regulations for the tools and equipment you are using.

G. Report defective tools and equipment to your teacher.

H. Always report all accidents to your teacher.

I. Wear proper clothing and safety equipment in the field.


Lesson 2 environmental hazards and accident prevention7

Lesson 2: Environmental Hazards and Accident Prevention

  • Acceptable clothing in the forest:

    • Long sleeve shirts

    • Long-leg trousers

    • Safety shoes or high lace boots with hard toes

    • Hard hat if any cutting is occurring

    • Layer of clothing for cold

    • Rainsuit or poncho

    • Waterproof boots


Lesson 2 environmental hazards and accident prevention8

Lesson 2: Environmental Hazards and Accident Prevention

  • Stinging insects in our area:

    • Bees

    • Wasps

    • Hornets

    • Yellow Jackets

    • Scorpions (not an insect)

    • Mosquitos


Lesson 2 environmental hazards and accident prevention9

Lesson 2: Environmental Hazards and Accident Prevention

  • Biting insects in our area:

    • Fleas

    • Gnats

    • Chiggers

    • Flies

    • Ants

    • Ticks


Lesson 2 environmental hazards and accident prevention10

Lesson 2: Environmental Hazards and Accident Prevention

  • The two most venomous spiders in our area:

    • Brown recluse

    • Black widow


Brown recluse and black widow

Brown Recluse and Black Widow


Lesson 2 environmental hazards and accident prevention11

Lesson 2: Environmental Hazards and Accident Prevention

  • List the four most venomous snakes in our area:

    • Rattlesnakes

      • Eastern diamondback and Timber rattlesnake

    • Cottonmouth/Water moccasin

    • Copperhead

    • Coral snake


Rattlesnake and cottonmouth

Rattlesnake and Cottonmouth


Copperhead and coral snake

Copperhead and Coral snake


Lesson 2 environmental hazards and accident prevention12

Lesson 2: Environmental Hazards and Accident Prevention

  • List the three poisonous plants in our area:

    • Poison Ivy

    • Poison Oak

    • Poison Sumac


Poison ivy

Poison Ivy


Poison oak

Poison Oak


Poison sumac

Poison Sumac


Lesson 3 first aid

Lesson 3: First Aid

  • Why is first-aid so named ? Why isn’t it called last-aid ?

    • It is so named because it is the immediate, temporary care given to the victim of an accident or sudden illness until the services of a physician can be obtained.

  • Proper first-aid techniques may determine whether a victim lives or dies.


Lesson 3 first aid1

Lesson 3: First Aid

  • List items to be found in a first-aid kit that will be used in forestry settings:

    • Antiseptics

    • Adhesive bandages

    • Gauze pads

    • Gauze roller bandages

    • Triangular bandages

    • Scissors


Lesson 3 first aid2

Lesson 3: First Aid

  • Tweezers

  • Elastic bandages for sprains

  • Snake bite kit

  • Burn ointment

  • Eye wash bottle

  • Inflatable splint


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