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The bicycle PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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The bicycle. Lourdes González Asensio. Javier Belmonte Torrecillas. Fuensanta Hernández Salmerón. Jose Luis Martínez Pardo. Antonio Saorin-Perez Muelas. Raquel Carrillo Cañaveras. Equipment you need to ride on bicycle. Things You'll Need A helmet Riding gloves (optional)

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The bicycle

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The bicycle

  • Lourdes González Asensio

  • Javier Belmonte Torrecillas

  • Fuensanta Hernández Salmerón

  • Jose Luis Martínez Pardo

  • Antonio Saorin-Perez Muelas

  • Raquel Carrillo Cañaveras


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Equipment you need to ride on bicycle.


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  • Things You'll Need

  • A helmet

  • Riding gloves (optional)

  • Cycling shoes and clipless pedals OR

  • Basic pedals with clip in straps-closed toe shoes, no sandles!

  • Sunglasses recommended

  • Rear view mirror that fits on to your helmet, sunglasses or handlebar (optional)


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  • Step 1, Equipment. A helmet is NOT OPTIONAL. Over 90% of all fatal bike incidents involve a rider who was not wearing a helmet.


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  • Step 2 Brakes. The right brake controller controls the rear brakes and the left controls the front. This is important because you should gently use both but also understand that squeezing the front brakes too hard or alone is likely to send you flying over the handlebars. Step 2 Brakes. The right brake controller controls the rear brakes and the left controls the front. This is important because you should gently use both but also understand that squeezing the front brakes too hard or alone is likely to send you flying over the handlebars.


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  • Step 3, Shifters. Again, the right and left sides had different jobs. The right shifter controls the rear derailleur or shifting on the cassette and the left controls shifting on the front chain rings.


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Step 4, Mount up and ride!


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Factors That Influence Bike Safety

Safety in Numbers The first factor is the number of cyclists in the city. Areas with a higher density of cyclists have a lower accident rate per KM. There is also a virtuous circle. If the roads are deemed safe, then it will encourage more people to cycle.


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  • Visibility.  One of the commonest causes of cycle accidents is when motorists fail to see cyclists. This failure to see cyclists can be due to:

    no lights / dark clothes

    cyclists in drivers blind spots

    Method of Cycling

  • How people cycle also plays a key role. Accidents are often due to lack of attention and care. For example cycling on the pavement is a relatively more dangerous than on the road. This is because motorists are less likely to see a cyclist on pavement come around corner.


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  • Time of Day. The most dangerous times for cycling tend to be around twilight (early morning and late evening). A report suggested in Florida 60% of bike fatalities occur at twilight despite only 3% of all journeys.

  • Roads Used / Average Speed. In the UK, the roads with the highest fatality rates are mainly rural A roads. These are fast twisty roads with speed limits of 50mph. At higher speeds, accidents are more likely to be fatal. At 20mph only 5% of impacts with car prove fatal. At 30mph this rises to 45%. At 40mph this rises to 85%.


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Bicycleaccidents

One of the commonest causes of cycle accidents is when motorists fail to see cyclists.

This failure to see cyclists can be due to:

  • Cyclists go without proper clothing and lights for the bike.

  • Cyclists in drivers blind spots (especially when lorries turning left)

Fuensanta Hernández Salmerón.


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Methodof Cycling

Accidents are often due to lack of attention and care. This is because motorists are less likely to see a cyclist on pavement come around corner.

Fuensanta Hernández Salmerón.


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To improve safety on the bike:

  • Make a noise.

Tone.

  • Often motorists will be signalling left.

  • Wear Helmet.

Fuensanta Hernández Salmerón.


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Essential Bike Commuter Gear

 Here are the items bike commuters need to make sure they stay safe and comfortable on their daily trips:

1. Headlight:

If you're going to commute regularly, you need a good front light for your bicycle.


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2. Tail lights:

Just as important as the white light on the front of your bike is a red one on the back. Most offer several blinking patterns - steady, continuous flash, random, etc., -- to give you and your bike visibility from the rear to approaching motorists and others from a long way off.

3. Reflective Vest or Jacket:

Your goal is to be as visible to motorists as possible.


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4. Bike Rack:

With a rack or basket on your bike, you can tote along the necessities like your lunch, a change of clothes or books and papers for school or work.

5. Fenders:

Fenders are wheel covers that prevent your wheels from throwing water and road filth all over you as you ride.


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6. Rain Gear:

If you ride regularly, you're going to get rained on. It's just a fact of life. The good news is that decent raingear makes riding bearable and even fun when it gets wet out.

7. Basic bake tools:

A basic set of tools will keep you going even if you have minor breakdown along the way.


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8. Frame Pump:

Whether you carry a patch kit or spare tube, if your tire goes flat, you will need to find a way to get air back into it. That's where a nice little pump comes in. Usually clamped to your frame, these mighty little dudes will put enough air in your tire to get you back on your way.

9. Spare tube:

When riding day in and day out on your commute, by far the most likely problem you'll have with your bike is a flat tire. So bring along another tube specific to your bike. They are fairly compact, easy to change out, and you'll be back riding in no time


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Beginner’s Mountain Bike info guide

This mountain biking information guide was created for the beginning off-road cyclist by the Responsible Organized Mountain Pedalers (ROMP). In it you will find important basic information on trail rules, safety and equipment.


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Safety

  • Etiquette and safety rules are important for the well-being and enjoyment of all trail users, but there is another reason you should obey them: If we don't follow these simple guidelines, all cyclists will lose access to our trails.


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Safety Rules

  • Ride on open trails only

  • Leave no trace

  • Control your bicycle

  • Always yield the trail

  • Never spook animals


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Equipament

  • The following equipment is required for safety:

  • HELMET – Buy one that fits right and wear it. Not only is a helmet required in many local parks, but it will save your life.

  • Water – Carry two water bottles and cages, or one of the alternative water systems (such as a CamelBak). You will lose a lot of water as you ride. Drink water to prevent dehydration.

  • Appropriate clothing – Dress for the weather and riding conditions. The weather on the trail is often much different than where you live. Be prepared.


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TECHNIQUE

The following is a brief description of some basic riding techniques. To learn more, try ROMP's Mountain Bike Basic clinic, or read a book on technique for beginners. Always remember to ride within your level. It is better to get off and walk an area that you aren't comfortable with than to risk injury.


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Balance

Climbing

Descending

Cornering

Braking

Shifting

Singletrack

Mud

Sand

Rocks

holes

bumps

Water and water crossings–


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Basic Repair

What good is carrying all these tools if you don't know how to use them? Your bike will break down at some point, and it is much more convenient to fix it and ride out than it is to have to walk out. You should know how to perform basic repairs, such as:

Fixing a flat tire

Derailed chain

Broken chain

Loose or broken spoke


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Maintenance

You may prefer to have a shop do all your major maintenance, but there are certain maintenance tasks that need to be done often. You should learn how to do these.

Clean chain

Lubricate chain and wipe off excess lubricant

Check and adjust tire pressure

Check headset for play

Adjust brakes

Tighten bolts

Check wheels for alignment

Clean bike

Lubricate cables and derailleurs


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