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CASE STUDY OF: THE EGYPT-UGANDA AQUATIC WEED CONTROL PROJECT: South-South Cooperation, Capacity Development, and Aid Effectiveness. Outline : Context and Background Methodology The Egypt-Uganda Aquatic Weed Control Project Key Challenges Lessons Leaned. Context and Background.

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CASE STUDY OF: THE EGYPT-UGANDA AQUATIC WEED CONTROL PROJECT: South-South Cooperation, Capacity Development, and Aid Effectiveness

Outline:

Context and Background

Methodology

The Egypt-Uganda Aquatic Weed Control Project

Key Challenges

Lessons Leaned


Context and background

Context and Background

Aquatic weeds in Uganda

Water Hyacinth Problem - its effects on livelihoods of fishing communities

Assistance to Uganda to address the Water hyacinth problem and key concerns

Heavy rains in 1997/98 – the rise in lake level

The papyrus problem – blockage and flooding


Context and background1

Context and Background

Responses: The period 1989 to 1997

Help form United States, The Netherlands, Japan, UNDP, and Belgium

Responses: From 1998 to date

Egypt-Uganda Aquatic Weed Control Project


Methodology

METHODOLOGY

Review of relevant literature

Information search

Interviewing key project implementers

We interviewed key people on both sides – Egypt and Uganda. This included people on the Steering Committee, Technical Committee, and The Egyptian Engineering Company.

Focus group discussion with communities in Kikoge village on Lake Kyoga


The egypt uganda aquatic weed control project

The Egypt-Uganda Aquatic Weed Control Project

Agreement was signed on 22, March 2008 between Egypt’s Ministry of Water Resources and Irrigation and Uganda’s Ministry of Agriculture, Animal Industry and Fisheries

Project objectives

Project financing

Management of the project

- Steering Committee

- Technical Committee

- Egyptian Technical Firm of Engineers

Payments based on submission of details of work implemented


The egypt uganda aquatic weed control project1

The Egypt-Uganda Aquatic Weed Control Project

Project results

Phase 1 (1999-2007): US$13.9 million

Phase 2 (2008 - 2009): US$4.5 million

Phase 3 (2010 – 2011): US$ 2.0 million

Extensions were at the request of the Uganda Government


The egypt uganda aquatic weed control project2

The Egypt-Uganda Aquatic Weed Control Project

Project results during phase 1:

Purchase of mechanical equipment (46 stomachs)

Use of geographical information system (GIS) to determine tracks to be cleared from weeds to solve the problem of blockage on Lake Kyoga

Construction of an outlet (36 Km Long and 100 meters wide)


The egypt uganda aquatic weed control project3

The Egypt-Uganda Aquatic Weed Control Project

Cleaning the mouth of Kagera river on Lake Victoria

Preparation of training programes for 100 trainees and facilitation of 1200 Ugandan technicians and engineers

Project results during phase 2:

25 villages developed thru strengthening of rivers/lakes banks

Gaba fish landing site developed

20 water harvesting dams constructed to cater for domestic and livestock needs

Periodic maintenance of lakes and rivers to free them of aquatic weed


The egypt uganda aquatic weed control project4

The Egypt-Uganda Aquatic Weed Control Project

Project results during phase 3:

Established 10 water harvesting and 5 aquaculture farms

Development of 5 villages around the shores of the great lakes

Development of Masese fishing landing site

Maintenance of rivers and lakes to clear them of the aquatic weed


Key challenges

Key Challenges

Ownership and mutual accountability

The project addressed some critical development challenges facing the country

Uganda Government was involved

But implementation raised some doubts

Domestically on the Uganda side the MAIF, NEMA, and Ministry of Water and Environment had different views about the project


Key challenges1

Key Challenges

Ownership:

On the Egypt side, location of the project in the Ministry of Water Resources and Irrigation raised some concerns in some circles in Uganda

Financing of the project was controlled from Cairo.

Uganda national financial systems were not used

Accountability was mainly to Cairo


Key challenges2

Key Challenges

Capacity Development

Yes, the project was effective in purchasing of equipment and involving Ugandans in operation of the equipment

Retention of manpower that operated the machinery proved difficult

Continuity – Exit of knowledgeable politicians, and high level management and technical staff

Machinery was reported to have remained idle despite the fact that the project is on-going


Key challenges3

Key Challenges

Aid effectiveness

The project was effective in addressing flooding and associated problems

Its impact on the welfare of fishing communities are mixed

Expectations of communities on the ground were very different from those of project managers

Fishing communities doubt that Uganda has the capacity to contain such a problem in case it arose again

The project stretched to unfamiliar area of development, beyond controlling the aquatic weeds


Lessons learned

Lessons Learned

Objectives should be clearly stated – from phase to phase

Ownership and mutual accountability should be streamlined as the guiding principle

A capacity development plan must be made; it should include a strategy of maintaining built capacity (both equipment and human resource)

Suspicion adversely affects results

Aid effectiveness depends on the extent to which stated objectives are pursued


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