Using developmentally appropriate language when interviewing children l.jpg
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 12

Using Developmentally Appropriate Language When Interviewing Children PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 67 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Using Developmentally Appropriate Language When Interviewing Children. Chris Newlin, MS LPC Harbor House 706-235-5437 [email protected] Harbor House Mission. Provide a child-friendly environment to interview children regarding allegations of sexual and/or severe physical abuse

Download Presentation

Using Developmentally Appropriate Language When Interviewing Children

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Using developmentally appropriate language when interviewing children l.jpg

Using Developmentally Appropriate Language When Interviewing Children

Chris Newlin, MS LPC

Harbor House

706-235-5437

[email protected]


Harbor house mission l.jpg

Harbor House Mission

  • Provide a child-friendly environment to interview children regarding allegations of sexual and/or severe physical abuse

  • Coordinate the multidisciplinary investigation of these allegations

  • Limit any additional trauma to the child


Introductions l.jpg

Introductions

  • Role

    • DFCS

    • Law Enforcement

    • Mental Health

    • Other

  • Function

    • Interview

    • Don’t interview


Goal of training l.jpg

Goal Of Training

  • Improve your ability to effectively communicate with children

    • Age at which specific details are likely to be expected

    • Five types of questions and expected responses

    • Three primary factors that may affect a child’s responses


Slide5 l.jpg

  • “Even very young children can tell us what they know if we ask them the right questions in the right way.”

    • Anne Graffam Walker, Ph.D.


Age when specific details are likely to be communicated l.jpg

Age when specific details are likely to be communicated


Identify different question types l.jpg

Identify different question types

  • Did he have his clothes on, or off, or something else?

  • What happened that time in the truck?

  • I know someone touched you, who did that?

  • Did your mom hurt you?

  • What happened?

  • She licked your pee-pee, didn’t she?

  • Was it your mom, your step-mom, or something else?


Review of training l.jpg

Review of training

  • At what age can a child tell you about:

    • Who

    • What

    • Where

    • When

    • # of times

    • Circumstances


Review of training11 l.jpg

Review of Training

  • What type of question yields the most narrative information?

  • What type of question yields the least amount of useful information?

  • What may diminish a child’s responses?

  • What may enhance a child’s responses?


Finding words georgia l.jpg

Finding Words Georgia

  • Forensic Interview training for:

    • DFCS Investigators

    • Law Enforcement Investigators

    • Child Abuse Prosecutors

  • Application for 2004 Trainings

    • www.gachildadvocate.org/pdf/2004fwg-app.pdf


  • Login