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Seminar Presentation ENG 4U5. King Lear : Nothing and the Fool. Nothing’s a Fool. Mitchell Mahood Raphael Koh Daniel Allen Dylan Seago Meaghan Horsley. Nothing = Everything. Fool = Wise. Overview. Significance of "Nothing" Act 1 - 2 by Mitchell Mahood Act 3 - 5 by Raphael Koh

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King Lear : Nothing and the Fool

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Seminar presentation eng 4u5

Seminar Presentation

ENG 4U5

King Lear: Nothing and the Fool

Nothing’s a Fool

Mitchell Mahood

Raphael Koh

Daniel Allen

Dylan Seago

Meaghan Horsley


King lear nothing and the fool

Nothing = Everything

Fool = Wise


Overview

Overview

  • Significance of "Nothing"

    • Act 1 - 2 by Mitchell Mahood

    • Act 3 - 5 by Raphael Koh

  • Significance of "Fool"

    • Act 1 by Daniel Allen

    • Act 2 - 3 by Dylan Seago

    • Act 4 - 5 by Meaghan Horsley


Script

SCRIPT

Sympathy/Pathos for a character

Character DevelopmentRelationshipsImages/MotifsPlot/SettingThemes


Themes

Themes

  • Justice

    • "It is up to human beings to administer justice in the world. "

  • Authority VS Chaos

    • "Once authority is lost, chaos will reign. "

  • Richness

    • "You must be poor to be rich. "

  • Appearance VS Reality

    • "Things are not what they appear to be."


The significance of

The Significance of


The significance of nothing

The Significance of Nothing

Parts of Play: Acts 1, 2

Presenter: Mitchell Mahood


The significance of nothing1

The Significance of Nothing

A third more opulent than your sisters? Speak.

CORDELIA: Nothing, my lord.

KING LEAR: Nothing!

CORDELIA: Nothing.

KING LEAR: Nothing will come of

nothing: speak again.

(I.i.86)

  • Character Development

  • Sympathy


The significance of nothing2

The Significance of Nothing

Right noble Burgundy,

When she was dear to us, we did hold her so;

But now her price is fall'n. Sir, there she stands:

If aught within that little seeming substance,

Or all of it, with our displeasure pieced,

And nothing more, may fitly like your grace,

She's there, and she is yours.

(I.i.200)

  • Sympathy

  • Relationships


The significance of nothing3

The Significance of Nothing

BURGUNDY:

Royal Lear,

Give but this portion which yourself proposed,

And here I take Cordelia by the hand,

Duchess of Burgundy.

KING LEAR: Nothing: I have sworn; I am firm.

(I.i.241)

  • Sympathy

  • Relationships


The significance of nothing4

The Significance of Nothing

GLOUCESTER: Why so earnestly seek you to put up that letter?

EDMUND: I know no news, my lord.

GLOUCESTER: What paper were you reading?

EDMUND: Nothing, my lord.

(I.ii.28)

  • Plot


The significance of nothing5

The Significance of Nothing

No? What needed, then, that terrible

dispatch of it into your pocket? the quality of nothing

hath not such need to hide itself. Let's see: come, if it

be nothing, I shall not need spectacles.

(I.ii.32)

  • Plot


The significance of nothing6

The Significance of Nothing

We have seen the best of our time: machina-

tions, hollowness, treachery, and all ruinous disorders,

follow us disquietly to our graves. Find out this

villain, Edmund; it shall lose thee nothing; do it

carefully. And the noble and true-hearted Kent

banished! his offence, honesty! 'Tis strange.

(I.ii.118)

  • Plot


The significance of nothing7

The Significance of Nothing

I am no honest man if there be any good meaning

towards you: I have told you what I have seen and

heard; but faintly, nothing like the image and horror

of it: pray you, away.

(I.ii.179)

  • Plot

  • Character Development


The significance of nothing8

The Significance of Nothing

Leave thy drink and thy whore,

And keep in-a-door,

And thou shalt have more

Than two tens to a score.

KENT: This is nothing, fool.

Fool: Then 'tis like the breath of an unfee'd lawyer;

you gave me nothing for't. Can you make no use

of nothing, nuncle?

Lear: Why no, boy. Nothing can be made of nothing.

(I.iv.137)

  • Character Development


The significance of nothing9

The Significance of Nothing

Fool: I marvel what kin thou and thy daughters are:

they'll have me whipped for speaking true, thou'lt

have me whipped for lying; and sometimes I am

whipped for holding my peace. I had rather be any

kind o' thing than a fool: and yet I would not be thee,

nuncle; thou hast pared thy wit o' both sides, and left

nothing i' the middle: here comes one o' the parings.

(I.iv.189)


The significance of nothing10

The Significance of Nothing

Fool: Thou wast a pretty fellow when thou hadst no

need to care for her frowning; now thou art an O

without a figure: I am better than thou art now; I am

a fool, thou art nothing.[To GONERIL.] Yes, forsooth,

I will hold my tongue; so your face bids me, though

you say nothing.

(I.iv.195)


The significance of nothing11

The Significance of Nothing

Have you not spoken 'gainst the Duke of Cornwall?

He's coming hither; now, i' the night, i' the haste,

And Regan with him: have you nothing said

Upon his party 'gainst the Duke of Albany?

Advise yourself.

(II.i.26)


The significance of nothing12

The Significance of Nothing

...super-serviceable finical rogue; one-trunk-inheriting

slave; one that wouldst be a bawd, in way of good

service, and art nothing but the composition of a

knave, beggar, coward, pandar, and the son and heir of

a mongrel bitch

(II.ii.25)

  • Character Development


The significance of nothing13

The Significance of Nothing

KENT:

Draw, you rogue: for, though it be night, yet

the moon shines; I'll make a sop o' the moonshine of

you: draw, you whoreson cullionly barber-monger, draw.

[Drawing his sword.]

OSWALD: Away! I have nothing to do with thee.

(II.ii.35)

  • Plot


The significance of nothing14

The Significance of Nothing

Approach, thou beacon to this under globe,

That by thy comfortable beams I may

Peruse this letter! Nothing almost sees miracles

But misery: I know 'tis from Cordelia,

Who hath most fortunately been inform'd

Of my obscured course;

(II.ii.168)

  • Theme - Richness


The significance of nothing15

The Significance of Nothing

That's something yet: Edgar I nothing am.

(II.iii.21)

  • Character Development

  • Sympathy


The significance of nothing16

The Significance of Nothing

Parts of Play: Acts 3 - 5

Presenter: Raphael Koh


The significance of nothing17

The Significance of Nothing

Tears his white hair,

Which the impetuous blasts, with eyeless rage,

Catch in their fury and make nothing of;

Strives in his little world of man to out-scorn

The to-and-fro-conflicting wind and rain.

(III.i.9)

  • Imagery

  • Sympathy

  • Symbolism - Chaos


The significance of nothing18

The Significance of Nothing

No, I will be the pattern of all patience;

I will say nothing.

(III.ii.38)

  • Character Development

  • Theme - Authority VS Chaos


The significance of nothing19

The Significance of Nothing

Go to; say nothing.

(III.iii.8)

  • Nothing = Everything

  • Plot - Foreshadowing

  • Relationship

  • Sympathy


The significance of nothing20

The Significance of Nothing

Lear: Couldst thou save nothing? Wouldst thou give ‘em all?

Fool:Nay, he reserved a blanket, else we had been all shamed.

Lear: Now all the plagues that in the pendulous air

Hang o'er men's faults light on thy daughters!

Kent: He hath no daughters, sir.

Lear:Death, traitor; nothing could have subdued nature

To such lowness but his unkind daughters.

(III.iv.64)

  • Plot – Dramatic Irony

  • Sympathy

  • Character Development

  • Motif - Madness


The significance of nothing21

The Significance of Nothing

The wretch that thou hast blown unto the worst

Owes nothing to thy blasts.

(IV.i.9)

  • Character Development

  • Plot - Foreshadowing


The significance of nothing22

The Significance of Nothing

Y’are much deceived: in nothing am I changed

But in my garments.

(IV.vi.9)

  • Nothing = Everything

  • Plot - Dramatic Irony


The significance of nothing23

The Significance of Nothing

'There is nothing done, if he return the con-

queror: then I am the prisoner, and his bed my jail; from the loathed warmth whereof deliver me,

and supply the place for your labour.’

(IV.vi.269)

  • Nothing = Everything

  • Plot


The significance of nothing24

The Significance of Nothing

There is my pledge:

I‘ll make it on thy heart,

Ere I taste bread, thou art in nothing less

Than I have here proclaimed thee.

(V.iii.95)

  • Plot

  • Theme - Justice


The significance of1

The Significance of


The significance of fool

The Significance of Fool

Parts of Play: Act 1

Presenter: Daniel Allen


The significance of fool1

The Significance of Fool

we make guilty of our disasters

the sun, the moon, and the stars: as if we were villains by

necessity; fools by heavenly compulsion; knaves,

thieves, and treachers, by spherical predominance;

drunkards, liars, and adulterers, by an enforced obedi-

ence of planetary influence;

(I.ii.123).

  • Fate/Freewill

  • Character

  • Sympathy


The significance of fool2

The Significance of Fool

A credulous father! and a brother noble,

Whose nature is so far from doing harms,

That he suspects none: on whose foolish honesty

My practices ride easy! I see the business.

Let me, if not by birth, have lands by wit:

All with me's meet that I can fashion fit.

(I.ii.183)

  • Motif - Betrayal

  • Plot


The significance of fool3

The Significance of Fool

Did my father strike my gentleman

for chiding of his fool?

(I.iii.1)

  • Relationship


The significance of fool4

The Significance of Fool

Idle old man,

That still would manage those authorities

That he hath given away! Now, by my life,

Old fools are babes again; and must be used

With checks as flatteries,--when they are seen abused.

Remember what I tell you.

(I.iii.17)

  • Relationship

  • Character


The significance of fool5

The Significance of Fool

Follow me; thou shalt serve me: if I like thee

no worse after dinner, I will not part from thee yet.

Dinner, ho, dinner! Where's my knave? my fool?

Go you, and call my fool hither.

(I.iv.41)

  • Plot - Reunited

  • Character - Impatience


The significance of fool6

The Significance of Fool

Thou but rememberest me of mine own con-

ception: I have perceived a most faint neglect of late;

which I have rather blamed as mine own jealous

curiosity than as a very pretence and purpose of un-

kindness: I will look further into't. But where's my

fool? I have not seen him this two days.

(I.iv.67)

  • Relationship - Fool & Cordelia

  • Character - Flattery


The significance of fool7

The Significance of Fool

Fool: Mark it, nuncle:

Have more than thou showest,

Speak less than thou knowest,

Lend less than thou owest,

Ride more than thou goest,

Learn more than thou trowest,

Set less than thou throwest;

Leave thy drink and thy whore,

And keep in-a-door,

And thou shalt have more

Than two tens to a score.

KENT: This is nothing, fool.

(I.iv.119)

  • Fool = Wise

  • Opposite


The significance of fool8

The Significance of Fool

Prithee, tell him, so much the rent

of his land comes to: he will not believe a fool.

(I.iv.36)

  • Character Development

    - Stubborn


The significance of fool9

The Significance of Fool

LEAR: A bitter fool!

Fool: Dost thou know the difference, my boy,

between a bitter fool and a sweet fool?

(I.iv.139)

  • Character Development

    - Criticism

  • Relationship


The significance of fool10

The Significance of Fool

That lord that counsell'd thee

To give away thy land,

Come place him here by me,

Do thou for him stand:

The sweet and bitter fool

Will presently appear;

The one in motley here,

The other found out there.

(I.iv.142)


The significance of fool11

The Significance of Fool

KING LEAR: Dost thou call me fool, boy?

Fool: All thy other titles thou hast given away; that

thou wast born with.

(I.iv.150)

  • Character - Criticism


The significance of fool12

The Significance of Fool

This is not altogether fool, my lord.

(I.iv.153)

  • Fool = Wise


The significance of fool13

The Significance of Fool

No, faith, lords and great men will not let me;

if I had a monopoly out, they would have part on't:

and ladies too, they will not let me have all fool

to myself; they'll be snatching. Give me an

egg, nuncle, and I'll give thee two crowns.

(I.iv.154)

  • Character - Foolish


The significance of fool14

The Significance of Fool

[Singing.]

Fools had ne'er less wit in a year;

For wise men are grown foppish,

They know not how their wits to wear,

Their manners are so apish.

(I.iv.167)

  • Character - Foolish


The significance of fool15

The Significance of Fool

Then they for sudden joy did weep,

And I for sorrow sung,

That such a king should play bo-peep,

And go the fools among.

Prithee, nuncle, keep a schoolmaster that can teach

thy fool to lie: I would fain learn to lie.

(I.iv.176)

  • Character - Foolish

  • Relationship - Loyalty


The significance of fool16

The Significance of Fool

I marvel what kin thou and thy daughters are:

they'll have me whipped for speaking true, thou'lt

have me whipped for lying; and sometimes I am

whipped for holding my peace. I had rather be any

kind o' thing than a fool: and yet I would not be thee,

nuncle; thou hast pared thy wit o' both sides, and left

nothing i' the middle: here comes one o' the parings.

(I.iv.183)

  • Character - Ruthless


The significance of fool17

The Significance of Fool

Thou wast a pretty fellow when thou hadst no

need to care for her frowning; now thou art an O

without a figure: I am better than thou art now; I am

a fool, thou art nothing.

(I.iv.192)

  • Relationship - Swap

  • Character


The significance of fool18

The Significance of Fool

Not only, sir, this your all-licensed fool,

But other of your insolent retinue

Do hourly carp and quarrel; breaking forth

In rank and not-to-be endured riots.

(I.iv.201)

  • Relationship - Swap

  • Character


The significance of fool19

The Significance of Fool

Nuncle Lear, nuncle Lear, tarry and take the fool with thee.

A fox, when one has caught her,

And such a daughter,

Should sure to the slaughter,

If my cap would buy a halter:

So the fool follows after.

(I.iv.318)

  • Character - Loyalty


The significance of fool20

The Significance of Fool

Yes, indeed: thou wouldst make a good fool.

(I.v.38)

  • Character - Foresight


The significance of fool21

The Significance of Fool

Parts of Play: Acts 2, 3

Presenter: Dylan Seago


The significance of fool22

The Significance of Fool

Knowing nought, like dogs, but following.

A plague upon your epileptic visage! ━

Smile you my speeches, as I were a fool?

Goose, if I had you upon Sarum plain,

I'd drive ye cackling home to Camelot.

(II.ii.74)

  • Character Development


The significance of fool23

The Significance of Fool

None of these rogues and cowards

But Ajax is their fool.

(II.ii.127)

  • Plot


The significance of fool24

The Significance of Fool

You see me here, you gods, a poor old man,

As full of grief as age; wretched in both!

If it be you that stir these daughters' hearts

Against their father, fool me not so much

To bear it tamely; touch me with noble anger,

And let not women's weapons, water-drops,

Stain my man's cheeks!

(II.iv.269)

  • Character Development


The significance of fool25

The Significance of Fool

You think I'll weep

No, I'll not weep:

I have full cause of weeping; but this heart

Shall break into a hundred thousand flaws,

Or ere I'll weep. O fool, I shall go mad!

(II.iv.279)

  • Plot


The significance of fool26

The Significance of Fool

O nuncle, court holy-water in a dry

house is better than this rain-water out o' door.

Good nuncle, in, and ask thy daughters' blessing:

here's a night pities neither wise man nor fool.

(III.ii.10)

  • Relationship


The significance of fool27

The Significance of Fool

None but the fool; who labours to out-jest

His heart-struck injuries.

(III.i.16)

  • Fool = wise


The significance of fool28

The Significance of Fool

Marry, here's grace and a cod-piece; that's a

wise man and a fool.

(III.ii.40)

  • Fool = wise


The significance of fool29

The Significance of Fool

Let go thy hold when a great wheel runs

down a hill, lest it break thy neck with following it: but

the great one that goes up the hill, let him draw thee

after. When a wise man gives thee better counsel, give

me mine again: I would have none but knaves follow

it, since a fool gives it.

(II.iv.66)

  • Motif

  • Plot

  • Character


The significance of fool30

The Significance of Fool

That sir which serves and seeks for gain,

And follows but for form,

Will pack when it begins to rain,

And leave thee in the storm,

But I will tarry; the fool will stay,

And let the wise man fly:

The knave turns fool that runs away;

The fool no knave, perdy.

(II.iv.76)

  • Character

  • Theme


The significance of fool31

The Significance of Fool

KENT Where learned you this, fool?

FOOL Not i' the stocks, fool.

(II.iv.84)

  • Fool = wise


The significance of fool32

The Significance of Fool

My wits begin to turn.

Come on, my boy: how dost, my boy? art cold?

I am cold myself. Where is this straw, my fellow?

The art of our necessities is strange,

That can make vile things precious. Come, your hovel.

Poor fool and knave, I have one part in my heart

That's sorry yet for thee.

(III.ii.67)

  • Climax

  • Sympathy


The significance of fool33

The Significance of Fool

This cold night will turn us all to fools and

madmen.

(III.iv.77)

  • Fools = wise

  • Plot


The significance of fool34

The Significance of Fool

Parts of Play: Acts 4, 5

Presenter: Meaghan Horsley


The significance of fool35

The Significance of Fool

How should this be?

Bad is the trade that must play fool to sorrow,

Angering itself and others.

(IV,i,38)

  • Theme - Appearances


The significance of fool36

The Significance of Fool

Oh the difference of man and man!

To thee a woman's services are due.

My fool usurps my body.

(IV,ii,29)

No more. The text is foolish.

(IV,ii,38)

Fools do those villains pity who are punished

Ere they have done their mischief.

(IV,ii,55)


The significance of fool37

The Significance of Fool

France spreads his banners in our noiseless land,

With plumed helm thy state begins to threat,

Whiles thou, a moral fool, sits still and cries,

"Alack, why does he so?"

(IV,ii,59)

O vain fool!

(IV,ii,62)

  • Character Development


The significance of fool38

The Significance of Fool

When we are born, we cry that we are come

To this great stage of fools.

(IV,vi,170)

  • Theme –

    Appearance


The significance of fool39

The Significance of Fool

No rescue? What, a prisoner? I am even

The natural fool of fortune.

(IV,vi,179)

  • Imagery – Wheel of Fate


The significance of fool40

The Significance of Fool

Pray, do not mock me.

I am a very foolish fond old man.

(IV,vii,58)

You must bear with me.

Pray you now, forget and forgive.

I am old and foolish.

(IV,vii,85)

  • Character development


The significance of fool41

The Significance of Fool

And my poor fool is hanged.

(V,iii,314)

  • Fool = Cordelia


King lear nothing and the fool

Please unfasten your seat belts


Bibliography

Bibliography

Gill, N.S.. "Ajax - Trojan War Hero." Ancient / Classical History - Ancient Greece & Rome & Classics Research Guide. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Oct. 2012. <http://ancienthistory.about.com/cs/troyilium/p/Ajax.htm>.

Shakespeare, William. "King Lear - William Shakespeare - Google Books."Google Books. N.p., n.d. Web. 10 Oct. 2012. <http://books.google.ca/books?id=JcsOAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA243&lpg=PA243&dq=king+lear+fools+do+those+villains+pity+meaning&source=bl&ots=w9q4-Eirp2&sig=uIlVKfvuUnLWR0zmYd01M2j5nvQ&hl

Shakespeare, William. "Act II." As you like it;. [Rev. ed. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1954. Scene vii. Print.

"SparkNotes: King Lear: Themes, Motifs & Symbols." SparkNotes: Today's Most Popular Study Guides. N.p., n.d. Web. 18 Oct. 2012. <http://www.sparknotes.com/shakespeare/lear/themes.html>. 


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