THE YOUTH DEVELOPMENT APPROACH TO ZEALOUS ADVOCACY

THE YOUTH DEVELOPMENT APPROACH TO ZEALOUS ADVOCACY PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 144 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Special Thanks. Dr. Ann Tobey and Dr. Penny HaneyLaurie Jo Wallace and Mo Barboza of the Medical FoundationGlenn Daly, Director of Youth Development Massachusetts EOHHSJudge Jay Blitzman and all the staff of the Youth Advocacy ProjectKatie Rollins, Tufts University. Starting the Conversation. Ex

Download Presentation

THE YOUTH DEVELOPMENT APPROACH TO ZEALOUS ADVOCACY

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


1. THE YOUTH DEVELOPMENT APPROACH TO ZEALOUS ADVOCACY The Youth Advocacy Project Committee for Public Counsel Services Roxbury, Massachusetts May 4, 2009

2. Special Thanks Dr. Ann Tobey and Dr. Penny Haney Laurie Jo Wallace and Mo Barboza of the Medical Foundation Glenn Daly, Director of Youth Development Massachusetts EOHHS Judge Jay Blitzman and all the staff of the Youth Advocacy Project Katie Rollins, Tufts University Ross Greene Jay BlitzmanRoss Greene Jay Blitzman

3. Starting the Conversation Explorers? Advocacy Presentation Broad brush Exceptions Not New Knowledge, New Organization

4. Goals YDA What is it? Why should we use it? (What do we do now?) How do we use it?

6. Youth live and grow and are trying to get what they need (develop) regardless of adult roles, interactions, formal program Adults can/should play a significant role in providing youth with the resources, opportunities, and services they need to experience healthy development.Youth live and grow and are trying to get what they need (develop) regardless of adult roles, interactions, formal program Adults can/should play a significant role in providing youth with the resources, opportunities, and services they need to experience healthy development.

7. Context is Everything The Adversarial System Adult Corrections Court Involved Youth

8. YDA in an Adversarial System

9. The Adversarial System Truth Seeking and Dispute Resolution Winning v. Understanding Impartial Decision Makers Judges Juries Parties Those with Rights Those with an Interest

10. Chronically Court Involved Adults Education Wealth/Career/Employment Family circumstances Mental Health Alcohol/Substance use Place in the Community

11. Court Involved Adults Problem Solving skills? Social Competence Skills? Sense of the Future? Autonomy? These are the characteristics of a resilient person.These are the characteristics of a resilient person.

12. Youth in Juvenile Court School? Money? Out of School Time? Family? Health and Health Care? Safety? Community engagement?

13. Adolescents Problem Solving skills? Social Competence Skills? Sense of the Future? Autonomy? These are the skills competencies and attitudes we want to help young people develop. Because happy, healthy, economically self sufficient adults do not commit a lot of crime.These are the skills competencies and attitudes we want to help young people develop. Because happy, healthy, economically self sufficient adults do not commit a lot of crime.

14. The Current Juvenile Court Approach Decision makers often rely upon a carrot and stick approach Court processes often focus on the “accountability” of each individual child and sees all behavior as essentially willful Adults attempt to cure bad behavior by unilaterally imposing our will The ends justify the means. Bad behavior is punished - Good behavior is “rewarded” Due process must be tolerated in order to legally get to punishment phase. Adults believe that youth are rational actors who will change their behavior in order to avoid punishment, much like lab rats. Judges, probation officers, prosecutors understand (to some extent) mitigation. That are not always devoid of sympathy. They rarely understand what youth need to be successful. We rely on a knee jerk formula that undesirable behavior must be punished.The ends justify the means. Bad behavior is punished - Good behavior is “rewarded” Due process must be tolerated in order to legally get to punishment phase. Adults believe that youth are rational actors who will change their behavior in order to avoid punishment, much like lab rats. Judges, probation officers, prosecutors understand (to some extent) mitigation. That are not always devoid of sympathy. They rarely understand what youth need to be successful. We rely on a knee jerk formula that undesirable behavior must be punished.

15. Positive Youth Outcomes Go back to letter 2) Share a few as time allows 3) Ask: How might the letters be different if they were to a juvenile client? 4) YDA assumes a lens of all young people being potential productive citizens with something to offer their communities now and into the future 5) Introduce PYO and the value of each; a possible obstacle is when it is assumed delinquent youth are not ready for this approach What we want for youth Explain the 3 legs of a stool Ask for examples of each PYO Acknowledge different contexts that tend to focus on one or the other PYO and not give weight to all 3 (e.g. Schools: achievement). Ask: What PYO, if any, they think they tend to focus on...Go back to letter 2) Share a few as time allows 3) Ask: How might the letters be different if they were to a juvenile client? 4) YDA assumes a lens of all young people being potential productive citizens with something to offer their communities now and into the future 5) Introduce PYO and the value of each; a possible obstacle is when it is assumed delinquent youth are not ready for this approach What we want for youth Explain the 3 legs of a stool Ask for examples of each PYO Acknowledge different contexts that tend to focus on one or the other PYO and not give weight to all 3 (e.g. Schools: achievement). Ask: What PYO, if any, they think they tend to focus on...

16. Definitions of Outcomes Problem Free Outcomes Not having a negative occurrence (e.g., no arrests) Achievement Outcomes Positive successes (e.g., honor roll, learning a skill) Developmental Outcomes Overall healthy development

17. Achievement Problem-free/Prevention High School Diploma Job Passing the MCAS Earning a certificate of completion Not doing drugs Not stealing a car Not getting pregnant Not joining a gang

18. Examples of Developmental Outcomes Aspects of Identity Safety & Structure Self-Worth Mastery & Future Belonging & Membership Responsibility & Autonomy Self-Awareness & Spirituality Areas of Ability Physical Health Mental Health Intellectual Ability Employability Civic & Social Ability Cultural Ability This is the path to long-term problem-free and achievement -- the internal aspects that lead to them Be ready with examples of each This is the path to long-term problem-free and achievement -- the internal aspects that lead to them Be ready with examples of each

19. CLIENT EXAMPLE Get a couple of descriptions of typical cases the lawyers are coming across in their courts. Setting High Expectations for our clients and ourselves. How would we characterize the elements of our hopes and dreams for the children in our own families? Setting High Expectations for our clients and ourselves. How would we characterize the elements of our hopes and dreams for the children in our own families? Get a couple of descriptions of typical cases the lawyers are coming across in their courts. Setting High Expectations for our clients and ourselves. How would we characterize the elements of our hopes and dreams for the children in our own families? Setting High Expectations for our clients and ourselves. How would we characterize the elements of our hopes and dreams for the children in our own families?

20. Adolescent Development These needs are important for all youth, and in adolescence they are especially important. As you’ll no doubt recall, adolescence is a terribly significant time of tremendous growth and change…. It’s an exciting time and it’s a stressful time. In fact, except for infancy, it is the period of the most rapid and pervasive changes (Steinberg & Schwartz, 2000). Children enter this period at around age 12, bringing with them all of their experiences and competencies (or lack thereof) culled from childhood, to face the tasks of growing physically, intellectually, emotionally, and socially. These needs are important for all youth, and in adolescence they are especially important. As you’ll no doubt recall, adolescence is a terribly significant time of tremendous growth and change…. It’s an exciting time and it’s a stressful time. In fact, except for infancy, it is the period of the most rapid and pervasive changes (Steinberg & Schwartz, 2000). Children enter this period at around age 12, bringing with them all of their experiences and competencies (or lack thereof) culled from childhood, to face the tasks of growing physically, intellectually, emotionally, and socially.

21. Gray matter ? “thinking” tissue, followed by a period of “pruning,” during which the brain discards gray matter at a rapid rate. Similarly to pruning a tree, cutting back branches stimulates health and growth. Myelination, a process by which white matter develops, also occurs during pruning. The white matter is fatty tissue that serves as insulation for the brain’s circuitry, making its operation more precise and efficient. The frontal lobe - Undergoes more changes during adolescence, than any other stage. - The last part of the brain to develop. - adult-like reasoning ? Thus, adolescents may be capable or mature in other areas of their lives, but still cannot reason as well as adults. - impulse and aggression control comes from the frontal lobe (that’s why people w/ frontal lobe injuries seem immature, impulsive, and uninhibited) - As a result, adolescents often rely on emotional parts of the brain when responding, as opposed to the frontal lobe. Gray matter ? “thinking” tissue, followed by a period of “pruning,” during which the brain discards gray matter at a rapid rate. Similarly to pruning a tree, cutting back branches stimulates health and growth. Myelination, a process by which white matter develops, also occurs during pruning. The white matter is fatty tissue that serves as insulation for the brain’s circuitry, making its operation more precise and efficient. The frontal lobe - Undergoes more changes during adolescence, than any other stage. - The last part of the brain to develop. - adult-like reasoning ? Thus, adolescents may be capable or mature in other areas of their lives, but still cannot reason as well as adults. - impulse and aggression control comes from the frontal lobe (that’s why people w/ frontal lobe injuries seem immature, impulsive, and uninhibited) - As a result, adolescents often rely on emotional parts of the brain when responding, as opposed to the frontal lobe.

22. Challenges of Adolescent Development Time Perspective Risk Taking/Sensation Seeking Egocentrism Magical/Wishful Thinking Impulsivity ? The nature of adolescent development, though, lends itself to some risks as well………..there are challenges inherent in adol dev’l 1. Present-oriented thinking – difficulty thinking about the future, or they discount the future and with the short-term risks and benefits more heavily 2. Risk-taking and sensation seeking—because the adolescent isn’t fully able to consider consequences --- this is a period of seeking and valuing new experiences, finding an identity, becoming a grown-up --- all adol then need some varied, novel, and complex sensations and experiences and the willingness to take physical and social risks for the sake of the experiences. They value new experiences more than adults, perceived sense of invulnerability 3. Egocentrism – See only the present difficult circumstances, see their experiences as unique, super-sensitive, self-involved so show less remorse/empathy 4. Magical or wishful thinking – common when they feel cornered, confronted with undesirable alternatives, or when they have difficulty thinking their way out of a dilemma. Set aside rational thinking for a magical solution that adults recognize as unrealistic. Similarly adolescents often view the consequences of their actions as surprising when adults would easily predict the outcome 5. Impulsivity – not able to regulate emotion & govern behavior as adults do ? their frontal lobes are not as well dev’l ? The nature of adolescent development, though, lends itself to some risks as well………..there are challenges inherent in adol dev’l 1. Present-oriented thinking – difficulty thinking about the future, or they discount the future and with the short-term risks and benefits more heavily 2. Risk-taking and sensation seeking—because the adolescent isn’t fully able to consider consequences --- this is a period of seeking and valuing new experiences, finding an identity, becoming a grown-up --- all adol then need some varied, novel, and complex sensations and experiences and the willingness to take physical and social risks for the sake of the experiences. They value new experiences more than adults, perceived sense of invulnerability 3. Egocentrism – See only the present difficult circumstances, see their experiences as unique, super-sensitive, self-involved so show less remorse/empathy 4. Magical or wishful thinking – common when they feel cornered, confronted with undesirable alternatives, or when they have difficulty thinking their way out of a dilemma. Set aside rational thinking for a magical solution that adults recognize as unrealistic. Similarly adolescents often view the consequences of their actions as surprising when adults would easily predict the outcome 5. Impulsivity – not able to regulate emotion & govern behavior as adults do ? their frontal lobes are not as well dev’l

23. The Constellation of Youth Development Needs --- well, you’ll all be excited to know that while you were thinking about proms and driving and grades, what you were really doing was meeting your needs as an adolescent……………… ? These go back to those things you all identified as focusing on during your teenage years All Youth Need: To know they are cared about by others (Attachment & Belonging) To feel and believe they are capable and successful (Achievement/Mastery/Competence) To know they are able to influence people and events (Autonomy/Power/Independence) To practice helping others through their own generosity (Altruism/Purpose/Usefulness) --- well, you’ll all be excited to know that while you were thinking about proms and driving and grades, what you were really doing was meeting your needs as an adolescent……………… ? These go back to those things you all identified as focusing on during your teenage years All Youth Need: To know they are cared about by others (Attachment & Belonging) To feel and believe they are capable and successful (Achievement/Mastery/Competence) To know they are able to influence people and events (Autonomy/Power/Independence) To practice helping others through their own generosity (Altruism/Purpose/Usefulness)

24. All Youth Will Find Ways to: Meet their basic needs Build skills and values Use their skills, talents, energies and time in ways that make them feel good and powerful So, adolescents are trying to meet their needs in the midst of this period of rapid and intense development…all youth will Try to get their needs met They will do it using the skills and values they already have and those they acquire they WILL grow ? cognitive, physically, socially, emotionally, intrapersonally ? whether it’s for better or worse depends… If they can grow positively and prosocially (i.e., in terms of their skills and values), they will If they can’t, they will find negative and antisocial ways to build skills and acquire values and get their needs met Adolescents will use these skills, talents, energies, and time to master the tasks of adolescents They will try to do it in ways that make them feel good about themselves These may be prosocial or antisocial, depending…. ? Which is why it is SO important for adolescents’ needs to get metSo, adolescents are trying to meet their needs in the midst of this period of rapid and intense development…all youth will Try to get their needs met They will do it using the skills and values they already have and those they acquire they WILL grow ? cognitive, physically, socially, emotionally, intrapersonally ? whether it’s for better or worse depends… If they can grow positively and prosocially (i.e., in terms of their skills and values), they will If they can’t, they will find negative and antisocial ways to build skills and acquire values and get their needs met Adolescents will use these skills, talents, energies, and time to master the tasks of adolescents They will try to do it in ways that make them feel good about themselves These may be prosocial or antisocial, depending…. ? Which is why it is SO important for adolescents’ needs to get met

26. If Youth Needs are Met in Positive Ways Mastery ? competence Generosity ? usefulness Power ? independenceMastery ? competence Generosity ? usefulness Power ? independence

27. If Youth Needs are Met in Negative Ways If youth’s needs are met in negative ways… i.e., if their sense of belonging, competence, independence, and usefulness within the typical prosocial structures of our society is perceived or reinforced in negative ways (e.g., seen as the “bad” kid in school, gravitate toward the “bad” kids, difficult connecting with positive adults or surrounded by adults who are poor influences, have a pessimistic view of the world and their future) --- essentially if they don’t fit into prosocial structures BUT do fit in and do have available to them, negative/antisocial/dysfunctional structures, they may develop the following….. Noblesse oblige --- Benevolent, honorable behavior considered to be the responsibility of persons of high birth or rank If youth’s needs are met in negative ways… i.e., if their sense of belonging, competence, independence, and usefulness within the typical prosocial structures of our society is perceived or reinforced in negative ways (e.g., seen as the “bad” kid in school, gravitate toward the “bad” kids, difficult connecting with positive adults or surrounded by adults who are poor influences, have a pessimistic view of the world and their future) --- essentially if they don’t fit into prosocial structures BUT do fit in and do have available to them, negative/antisocial/dysfunctional structures, they may develop the following….. Noblesse oblige --- Benevolent, honorable behavior considered to be the responsibility of persons of high birth or rank

28. If Need is Unmet If youth’s needs are unmet … i.e., if they don’t feel a sense of belonging, competence, independence, and usefulness within the typical prosocial structures of our society OR in the available antisocial structures, they may develop the following….. If youth’s needs are unmet … i.e., if they don’t feel a sense of belonging, competence, independence, and usefulness within the typical prosocial structures of our society OR in the available antisocial structures, they may develop the following…..

29. Now, as I’ve talked about these needs getting met, I’ve been focusing on the individual, but really it’s a more complicated process As this slide illustrates, this process of developing and meeting needs is intricately tied to the adolescent’s environment E.g., if a child gets the need for belonging met by belonging to a school organization that promotes prosocial values (e.g., peer leadership group) and they feel a sense of identity from that group and competency ? they will respond with competence, responsibility, cooperation, caring ? adults will treat them with care & warmth, appropriate expectations, rewards, etc. ? the adolescent is then more likely to continue behaving in these ways and will likely continue to get these needs met in this way IF, however, a child is not able to function within this group and begins to seek out antisocial ways (e.g., getting attention and peer reinforcement by disrupting class and acting tough) ? they may feel a sense of “competence” and “reinforcement” ? but adults will treat them punitively, adults are likely to be more negative toward them and remind them that they are not appropriate, they will be “expected” to act badly all the while being told to behave themselves, there will be little positive reinforcement ? the adolescent’s need for belonging will not be reinforced in a prosocial structure (i.e., school/teachers are NOT reinforcing him), so will continue to meet needs by seeking out negative/antisocial ways to meet needs, which in turn cause adults/environment to respond negative/punitively/harshlyNow, as I’ve talked about these needs getting met, I’ve been focusing on the individual, but really it’s a more complicated process As this slide illustrates, this process of developing and meeting needs is intricately tied to the adolescent’s environment E.g., if a child gets the need for belonging met by belonging to a school organization that promotes prosocial values (e.g., peer leadership group) and they feel a sense of identity from that group and competency ? they will respond with competence, responsibility, cooperation, caring ? adults will treat them with care & warmth, appropriate expectations, rewards, etc. ? the adolescent is then more likely to continue behaving in these ways and will likely continue to get these needs met in this way IF, however, a child is not able to function within this group and begins to seek out antisocial ways (e.g., getting attention and peer reinforcement by disrupting class and acting tough) ? they may feel a sense of “competence” and “reinforcement” ? but adults will treat them punitively, adults are likely to be more negative toward them and remind them that they are not appropriate, they will be “expected” to act badly all the while being told to behave themselves, there will be little positive reinforcement ? the adolescent’s need for belonging will not be reinforced in a prosocial structure (i.e., school/teachers are NOT reinforcing him), so will continue to meet needs by seeking out negative/antisocial ways to meet needs, which in turn cause adults/environment to respond negative/punitively/harshly

30. Characteristics of Court Involved Population Physical and Mental Health Poverty and poor schools Lack of out of school time support Problem relationships Safety Isolation/alienation Negatives Also positives: All kids are entitled to health insurance and we have lots of community health centers in the state. Rosie D., etc. All kids are entitled to an education until they are at least 22. There are also job programs. There are a lot of after school programs for youth. Most kids have adults who care about them and kids crave positive relationships. Given the opportunity most kids will gravitate toward healthier relationships. There are lots of ways to help kids feel engaged in their families, schools, neighborhoods, houses of worship etc.Negatives Also positives: All kids are entitled to health insurance and we have lots of community health centers in the state. Rosie D., etc. All kids are entitled to an education until they are at least 22. There are also job programs. There are a lot of after school programs for youth. Most kids have adults who care about them and kids crave positive relationships. Given the opportunity most kids will gravitate toward healthier relationships. There are lots of ways to help kids feel engaged in their families, schools, neighborhoods, houses of worship etc.

31. Paradigm Shift Valuing and supporting young people Youth not defined by their problems Youth are potential resources Youth need to be at the table Youth need assets to develop positively Adults are responsible for positive youth development

32. The New Paradigm The Youth Development Approach recognizes that children who can do well, will do well. If they aren’t doing well, there is a reason -- adults need to figure out why, so we can help Emphasis on understanding not blaming Emphasis on collaborative problem solving not consequences Emphasis on healthy development not just compliance Mutual satisfaction (fairness) Human beings are complex. If you threw a ten year old out on the street you would not expect him to survive. He certainly would not thrive. Most middle class kids are not truly autonomous until they are well into their twenties. Young people need support and guidance as they go through the process of building the skills and characteristics they will need to succeed in life. Human beings are complex. If you threw a ten year old out on the street you would not expect him to survive. He certainly would not thrive. Most middle class kids are not truly autonomous until they are well into their twenties. Young people need support and guidance as they go through the process of building the skills and characteristics they will need to succeed in life.

33. I did not make this up! From Neurons to Neighborhoods and The Explosive Child Healthy child development is dependent on a combination of individual responsibility, informal social supports, and formalized structures that evolve within a society --Jack Schoncoff The most important thing to know about inflexible-explosive children is that they don’t want to be inflexible or explosive. Their meltdowns aren’t intentional..., not a way to manipulate adults, get attention, test limits or engage in a power struggle... Watch a child during a meltdown and you’ll see how miserable (they are). No child would want to feel that way. --Ross Greene This lens is part of the YD umbrella. Kids failing in Juvenile Court are not happy. Dr. Greene uses a New Yorker cartoon to illustrate the conceptual disconnect adults often have in working with the explosive child. He says that traditionally “explosive children” were seen as using their tantrums to get attention or to get their way. Adults that see explosive children this way, also believe that the children can modify their own behavior if only they are properly motivated. He says that actually what has HAPPENED IS THAT THEY have found themselves in a social situation that they do not understand or that they do not have the skills to maneuver through and the resulting stress causes a meltdown. THE CARTOON Our clients are often seen the same way. Much of the court function is built around “motivating” better behavior. We also often hear the complaint that the young person did really well in a facility and went right back to his old way when he got home. Thinking about the cartoon. If someone came in and smoothed out the waves our young person might not be drowning. He might be able to tread water. Adults have the capacity to reduce stress in the lives of young people. Residential programming may do that. Alternative schools often do that. But if the programming does not also help the child develop the skills to swim to shore through the waves, eventually there is a good chance that our child may drown.This lens is part of the YD umbrella. Kids failing in Juvenile Court are not happy. Dr. Greene uses a New Yorker cartoon to illustrate the conceptual disconnect adults often have in working with the explosive child. He says that traditionally “explosive children” were seen as using their tantrums to get attention or to get their way. Adults that see explosive children this way, also believe that the children can modify their own behavior if only they are properly motivated. He says that actually what has HAPPENED IS THAT THEY have found themselves in a social situation that they do not understand or that they do not have the skills to maneuver through and the resulting stress causes a meltdown. THE CARTOON Our clients are often seen the same way. Much of the court function is built around “motivating” better behavior. We also often hear the complaint that the young person did really well in a facility and went right back to his old way when he got home. Thinking about the cartoon. If someone came in and smoothed out the waves our young person might not be drowning. He might be able to tread water. Adults have the capacity to reduce stress in the lives of young people. Residential programming may do that. Alternative schools often do that. But if the programming does not also help the child develop the skills to swim to shore through the waves, eventually there is a good chance that our child may drown.

34. THE YDA MODEL AND ZEALOUS ADVOCACY

36. Transformational Representation Life Success leads to Case Success The Dynamic Triangle of life outcomes Resources, Opportunities, and Services The Five Domains Relationships Education Experiential Learning The process of preparing a case. I am advocating for advocacy that does not simply ask a judge to feel sorry for a defendant; Nor do we simply want to provide information in mitigation of the criminal behavior. Applying a Youth Development Approach does help to explain behavior, but it also provides strategies that help advocates help clients to immediately begin to change and to develop strategies for future success. Services, Opportunities, Support. Buy a bike, teach to ride, hold the seat, let go. I am advocating for advocacy that does not simply ask a judge to feel sorry for a defendant; Nor do we simply want to provide information in mitigation of the criminal behavior. Applying a Youth Development Approach does help to explain behavior, but it also provides strategies that help advocates help clients to immediately begin to change and to develop strategies for future success. Services, Opportunities, Support. Buy a bike, teach to ride, hold the seat, let go.

37. Domains Search Institute 40 internal/external assets are building blocks of healthy youth development Massachusetts Statewide Policy on Youth: “All Massachusetts youth grow up to be healthy, caring, and economically self-sufficient adults.” Here is some really good news. As a society we have a lot of knowledge about what works and what does not. We each know a lot of this from our own experience. We also have a ton of research and more everyday about what kinds of activities and services promote healthy development. In your hand outs you will find lots of examples of that research. Here is some really good news. As a society we have a lot of knowledge about what works and what does not. We each know a lot of this from our own experience. We also have a ton of research and more everyday about what kinds of activities and services promote healthy development. In your hand outs you will find lots of examples of that research.

38. Domains Resources for Physical & Mental Health Nurturing/Positive Relationships Safe Places to Live and Learn Educational and Economic Opportunity Structured Activities & Civic Participation For the practitioner, it can all be put into five basic categories. Look at YAP opening booklet. Personal Development Plan.For the practitioner, it can all be put into five basic categories. Look at YAP opening booklet. Personal Development Plan.

39. Attorney Client Relationship Caring and supportive relationship High/Clear/Fair expectations Maximizing opportunities for participation Transitional and transformative

40. -- which brings us to the ecological model -- this model provides an overview of individual functioning – in this instance, of adolescent dev’l and illustrates that all levels of an environment impact the individual and v.v.-- which brings us to the ecological model -- this model provides an overview of individual functioning – in this instance, of adolescent dev’l and illustrates that all levels of an environment impact the individual and v.v.

41. Risk and Resilience Resilience ? the ability to cope positively with the stressors, challenges, adversity in one’s environment Protective factors ? factors that promote resilience Risk factors make it harder to cope and to get needs met and engage in the “circle” in a healthy manner to develop positively To really understand an adolescent, we need to know their strengths and competencies as well as risks and symptoms ? need to know their TOTAL environment ? Let me explain this model in a bit more detail -- you’ll notice two words up at the top --- risk and resilience --- these are the overlaying factors present at each level of the ecological model? Let me explain this model in a bit more detail -- you’ll notice two words up at the top --- risk and resilience --- these are the overlaying factors present at each level of the ecological model

42. STRESS & COPING All development needs stress and challenges Two sides of a balance Coping well requires resources to help you manage stress Some days are better than others (consistency is not always consistent) Ross Greene Cartoon analogy ? In order to understand risk/resilience, let’s step back and say a word about stress and coping b/c it ties into understanding the ecological model and adol dev’l STRESS --- is necessary --- there is an optimal amount of stress that promotes positive dev’l --- enough to promote growth and a optimal level of feeling overwhelmed without too much that it causes the organism to malfunction or shut down ---- think back to law school or a particularly intense case you’ve worked on ? you probably felt a sense of being overwhelmed at times, perhaps worried about whether you could meet the challenge, it pushed you to stretch yourself to a level you could actually meet, and you experience relative success that ultimately led to a higher level of development and functioning --- this is the two sides of the balance Everyone copes with some stress during the daily (hassles of daily living) – stresses can be physical (headaches, illness), social (peers mean to you), emotional (parental abuse), intellectual (school demands), etc….. You need to have some way of coping For everyone, some days are better than others Some coping skills (e.g., reasoning, seeking support, taking small steps) are better than others (e.g., avoiding) For adolescence, b/c of the rate/intensity of growth during this period of time, they are likely experiencing more stresses than in latency age If they are already having difficulty functioning or their coping skills are not as good, then daily demands of life for a teenager (e.g., taking a test) may feel particularly demanding, stressful, unmanageable Because they are also still learning many tasks essential to the ability to cope with stressors (e.g., emotional regulation, decision—making), and because they are experiencing more rapid growth (and thus stress), their ability to be consistent is not always consistent RESILIENCE is the overall ability to cope with adversity The more resilient a teen is, the better able they are to cope with both adolescence and their particular life circumstances Ross Greene Cartoon analogy ? In order to understand risk/resilience, let’s step back and say a word about stress and coping b/c it ties into understanding the ecological model and adol dev’l STRESS --- is necessary --- there is an optimal amount of stress that promotes positive dev’l --- enough to promote growth and a optimal level of feeling overwhelmed without too much that it causes the organism to malfunction or shut down ---- think back to law school or a particularly intense case you’ve worked on ? you probably felt a sense of being overwhelmed at times, perhaps worried about whether you could meet the challenge, it pushed you to stretch yourself to a level you could actually meet, and you experience relative success that ultimately led to a higher level of development and functioning --- this is the two sides of the balance Everyone copes with some stress during the daily (hassles of daily living) – stresses can be physical (headaches, illness), social (peers mean to you), emotional (parental abuse), intellectual (school demands), etc….. You need to have some way of coping For everyone, some days are better than others Some coping skills (e.g., reasoning, seeking support, taking small steps) are better than others (e.g., avoiding) For adolescence, b/c of the rate/intensity of growth during this period of time, they are likely experiencing more stresses than in latency age If they are already having difficulty functioning or their coping skills are not as good, then daily demands of life for a teenager (e.g., taking a test) may feel particularly demanding, stressful, unmanageable Because they are also still learning many tasks essential to the ability to cope with stressors (e.g., emotional regulation, decision—making), and because they are experiencing more rapid growth (and thus stress), their ability to be consistent is not always consistent RESILIENCE is the overall ability to cope with adversity The more resilient a teen is, the better able they are to cope with both adolescence and their particular life circumstances

43. So all of these factors ? types/amounts of stressors, types and amounts of risk factors and resiliency factors, the extent of risk vs. resilience factors in each level of the ecological system ALL impact how an adolescent is doing -- if more is going on in the risk factor column than the resilience factor, adol. is likely having more difficulties and v.v.So all of these factors ? types/amounts of stressors, types and amounts of risk factors and resiliency factors, the extent of risk vs. resilience factors in each level of the ecological system ALL impact how an adolescent is doing -- if more is going on in the risk factor column than the resilience factor, adol. is likely having more difficulties and v.v.

44. Current Adolescent Brain Research Adolescents are capable of making great decisions, but… - They are often less-skilled at making real-life decisions than adults - Neural pathways do not flow as smoothly or directly as with adults - Strong environmental & peer influence are normal - Risk-taking and lower capacity for self-management are developmentally appropriate

46. Sentencing Advocacy Marketing? Packaging the client as is? External Changes Internal Changes

47. Ross Greene’s Beach Waves and Undertow Providing a Life Preserver Teaching Swimming

48. YDA in an Adversarial System

49. Zealous Advocate Assists child & family in turning court process into a healthy developmental experience Helps court understand & meet the child’s developmental needs, improving legal and life outcomes Helps Court fairly and effectively meet mission of caring for kids and protecting the community

  • Login