Jefferson county and the civil war
Download
1 / 27

Jefferson County and the Civil War - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 107 Views
  • Uploaded on

Jefferson County and the Civil War. By: Ray Shreckengost. A history project that brings the Civil War home. Answering the Call.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about ' Jefferson County and the Civil War' - malia


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Jefferson county and the civil war

Jefferson County and the Civil War

By: Ray Shreckengost

A history project that brings

the Civil War home


Answering the call
Answering the Call

The Civil War was a time of great strife in our country. For many years the North and South drifted apart because of differing beliefs and opinions. The division between North and South finally came to blows and the American Civil War, or The War Between the States, began in 1861. The fighting continued until 1865. Many men from Jefferson County and right here in Brookville volunteered to fight for the Union. These brave men answered the call of duty in our nation’s darkest hour.

Be sure you put your feet in the right place, then stand firm. Abraham Lincoln


Civil war primary source portfolio
Civil War Primary Source Portfolio

  • You will be completing a Civil War primary source portfolio using primary sources and activities from this presentation. Your portfolio will consist of:

    • A cover page with a title, your name, and a primary source related to the Civil War

    • A Table of Contents Page

    • One completed activity for each type of primary source in this presentation. These activities will require you to analyze the primary sources in this presentation and rely on your knowledge gained by participating in our Civil War unit of study.

    • An example of each type of primary source (related to the Civil War) used in this presentation that you locate through searching the Internet.

    • A completed analysis sheet for each primary source that you locate

    • A self-assessment sheet

    • A works cited page

  • Your goal in this project is to use primary sources to get a better, more in-depth understanding of the Civil War. You should attempt to find some primary sources with a local emphasis.


The 105 th pa regiment of volunteers the wildcats
The 105th PA Regiment of Volunteers“The Wildcats”

Volunteers from Jefferson County were mustered into the 105th PA Regiment of Volunteers. These men were nicknamed the Wildcats for the early “wild cat” oil exploration in the area.

--taken from http://aoghs.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/December-30-Rock-Stock-AOGHS.jpg

--Taken from http://www.priweb.org/ed/pgws/history/pennsylvania/tarr_farm.html


Civil war documents written primary sources
Civil War Documents:Written Primary Sources

A letter written by Tilton C. Reynolds, a

Member of the 105th Regiment. The Letter

Was dated January 23, 1863. Reynolds Was

from Winslow Township which later Became

the town of Reynoldsville.

--Taken fromhttp://hdl.loc.gov/

loc.mss/mreynolds.008008


Civil war documents written primary sources1
Civil War Documents:Written Primary Sources

--an excerpt from a timeline of the 105th PA regiment taken from http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/collections/tcreynolds/tcrtime2.html

1863 January 20

The 105th leaves Camp Pitcher, Virginia, and begins a march along the Rappahannock River in the direction of Warrenton. Due to heavy rain, Burnside’s army remains stuck in the mud until February 12, when the regiment returns to its camp.


Civil war documents written primary sources2
Civil war Documents:Written Primary Sources

The Emancipation Proclamation The 13th Amendment

taken from http://www.archives.gov/historical-docs/


Civil war documents written primary sources3
Civil War Documents: Written Primary Sources

Document Activities

  • Refer to the Reynolds letter and the timeline excerpt for this Activity. Based on the information in the timeline excerpt, write a letter dated January 23, 1863 from Tilton Reynolds’ viewpoint explaining his recent experiences. You may wish to incorporate previous knowledge from our Civil War unit into your letter.

  • Write a newspaper article that would have been published in The Liberator describing either the Emancipation Proclamation or the 13th Amendment.

  • Locate at least one primary source related to the Civil War that would be considered a document. Be sure to include a completed NARA Written Document Analysis Sheet.


Civil war data statistics can be primary sources
Civil War Data:statistics can be Primary Sources

Civil War Troops

--taken from http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/historyonline/us20.cfm


Civil war data statistics can be primary sources1
Civil War Data:statistics can be Primary Sources


Civil war data statistics can be primary sources2
Civil War Data:statistics can be Primary Sources

Data Activities

  • Make a Bar Graph using the data provided in the “Civil War Troops” table.

  • Create two circle graphs that illustrate Union and CSA total forces for 1863 and the number of soldiers that fought in The Battle of Gettysburg. Each circle graph should include the number of soldiers at Gettysburg and the remaining soldiers that fought in other battles in 1863.

  • Locate at least one data-related primary source related to the Civil War . Include a completed SEA Method Worksheet for the primary source that you located.


Civil war cartoons primary sources that illustrate and interpret events
Civil War Cartoons: Primary Sources that Illustrate and Interpret Events

Thomas Nast’s influential cartoon, a masterpiece of campaign rhetoric, on the eve of the Election of 1864 neatly summed up the essential question of the contest from an ardent supporter of Lincoln and the Union: Democratic victory was equivalent to a compromise with the South. Compromise would mean that all the pain, suffering, and sacrifice of the past 3 and half years would be all in vain. The slave owner would prevail. Nast is not subtle as he incorporates symbols to get his point across. In the upper left corner, the federal flag flies upside down (a sign of distress). Columbia, kneeling at the feet of the Confederacy, weeps over Union dead while a veteran-amputee weakly shakes the hand of the

victor. The Confederate victor is portrayed young, handsome, and strong. He carries a whip in his hand; this he will presumably use on the slaves in the background. In the upper right, the Stars and Bars flies proudly.

--Illustration and text Taken from http://www.teachamericanhistory.org/File/

Political_Cartoons_of_the_Civil_War.pdf


Civil war cartoons primary sources that illustrate and interpret events1
Civil War Cartoons: Primary Sources that Illustrate and Interpret Events

After General William T. Sherman’s victory over Confederate General Hood at Atlanta in September 1864, Sherman took his army on a march to the sea. With his army consisting of 62,000 Union soldiers, Sherman abandoned his lines of supply and communication as he marched from Atlanta to Savannah, perfecting the art of total warfare along the way destroying everything of value in his path—a scorched earth policy. Sherman’s army cut a 60-mile wide swath of complete destruction through the middle of Georgia. Railroads, bridges,

farms, and crops were put to the torch. Livestock was captured; what couldn’t be eaten as

destroyed to prevent it from being used and consumed by Confederate soldiers or southern

sympathizers. Sherman reached Savannah in December, capturing the city without a fight.

Sherman wired Lincoln: “I beg to present you, as a Christmas gift, the city of Savannah.”

Sherman is seen here, putting the city of Savannah into Uncle Sam’s stocking.

--Illustration and text Taken from http://www.teachamericanhistory.

org/File/Political_Cartoons_of_the_

Civil_War.pdf


Civil war cartoons primary sources that illustrate and interpret events2
Civil War Cartoons: Primary Sources that Illustrate and Interpret Events

Cartoon Activities

  • Both political cartoons in this presentation present the Union’s viewpoint. Select one of the cartoons from this presentation. Create a political cartoon that illustrates and interprets the viewpoint that southern people would have had with the topic.

  • Create a cartoon that illustrates and interprets the reasons why many people in the Union, including some Union soldiers, thought that the Union should reach a compromise with the Confederacy.

  • Locate at least one primary source cartoon related to the Civil War . Include a completed NARA Cartoon Analysis Worksheet.


Civil war photos primary sources that bring people and events to life
Civil War Photos: Primary Sources That Bring People and Events to Life

Photos of Major M.M. Dick of the 105th PA Regiment of Volunteers

--taken from http://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource/cwpb.04491/?co=civwar


Civil war photos primary sources that bring people and events to life1
Civil War Events to LifePhotos: Primary Sources That Bring People and Events to Life

The Army of the Potomac marches down Pennsylvania Avenue at the end of the Civil War

--taken from http://www.americaslibrary.gov/jb/civil/jb_civil_parade_1_e.

html


Civil war photos primary sources that bring people and events to life2
Civil War Photos: Primary Sources That Bring People and Events to Life

Photo Activities

  • Locate a portrait of another Union Officer that was not from Pennsylvania. Complete a Venn Diagram, a Compare-Contrast Chart, or a compare-contrast essay that explains the similarities and differences in the two uniforms.

  • Locate information about one man who served in the 105th from the local area. Write a descriptive paragraph explaining what this man did after he left the 105th Regiment of PA Volunteers.

  • Locate at least one primary source photograph related to the Civil War that is not a portrait. Make sure to include a completed NARA Photo Analysis Worksheet.


Civil war posters persuasive primary sources
Civil War Posters: Events to LifePersuasive Primary Sources

A Recruiting Poster used to persuade men from Jefferson County to join the Union Army

--taken from http://www.pa-roots.com/pacw/infantry/105th/

105thorg.html


Civil war posters persuasive primary sources1
Civil War Posters: Events to LifePersuasive Primary Sources

A recruiting poster used by the Union to try to get skilled marksmen from PA

--taken from http://www.jonestownship.com/history/Kane.htm


Civil war posters persuasive primary sources2
Civil War Posters: Events to LifePersuasive Primary Sources

A recruiting poster used in Philadelphia to try to organize a black regiment for defense of the state

--taken from http://www.librarycompany.org/

mcallisterexhibition/section3.htm


Civil war posters persuasive primary sources3
Civil War Posters: Events to LifePersuasive Primary Sources

Poster Activities

  • Conduct an interview of an adult that you know. Begin your interview by viewing the Jefferson County Recruitment Poster. Then, ask the person whether they would serve in a local regiment if our country was faced with a possible attack. Make sure your interview subject gives reasons for their response. You can use a video camera, an audio recording, or a typed transcript for the interview.

  • Research and identify the nicknames given to five PA Volunteer regiments. Explain why each regiment received their nickname. You may choose to use a T-chart or write an essay for this activity.

  • Write a journal entry from the viewpoint of a black man living in Philadelphia in which you give a response to seeing the recruitment poster that was used in Philadelphia.

  • Locate at least one primary source poster related to the Civil War . Make sure to include a completed SEA Method Worksheet.


Civil war music primary sources that conveyed a nation s emotions
Civil War Music: Primary Sources That Conveyed a Nation’s Emotions

This is the first verse of “Ballad No. 1: When the Boys Come Marching Home.” This song was written to celebrate the return of PA volunteers.

--taken from http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/ampage?collId=amss&fileName=as1/as114850/amsspage.db&recNum=0&itemLink=D?amss:1:./temp/~ammem_otSm::

The Veteran troops are coming home, Hurrah! Hurrah! Our volunteers from Old Keystone, Hurrah! Hurrah! They have fought through many a battle sore, While grape like hail around did pour, But still their cry was Victory or death.


Civil war music primary sources that conveyed a nation s emotions1
Civil War Music: Primary Sources That Conveyed a Nation’s Emotions

The VACANT CHAIR

Words by H.S. Washburn

Music by George F. Root (1820-1895)

We shall meet but we shall miss him.

There will be one vacant chair.

We shall linger to caress him While we breathe our ev’ning prayer.

When one year ago we gathered, Joy was in his mild blue eye.

Now the golden cord is severed,

And our hopes in ruin lie.

This is The First verse from “the Vacant Chair.” This song was written to commemorate Union soldiers who gave their life in the Civil War.

--taken from http://www.civilwarpoetry.org/union/songs/chair.html


Civil war music primary sources that conveyed a nation s emotions2
Civil War Music: Primary Sources That Conveyed a Nation’s Emotions

Music Activities

  • Research how men who fought for the Union were honored when they returned home. You may create a poster, write a poem, or write a descriptive paragraph that illustrates or explains how these men were honored.

  • Create an illustration that could have been used as a cover sheet for “The Vacant Chair.”

  • Locate at least one example of music as a primary source related to the Civil War . Make sure to include a completed NARA Written Document Analysis Worksheet or A SEA Method Worksheet.


Civil war maps primary sources that illustrate details
Civil War Maps: Primary sources that Illustrate details Emotions

This map shows Union and Confederate positions at the Battle of the Wilderness. Liberty Burns was from Jefferson County and he fought with the 105th PA Regiment of Volunteers.

--taken from http://burnsfamilyhistory.com/

Images/Maps/WildernessMap

withArrow.jpg


Civil war maps primary sources that illustrate details1
Civil War Maps: Primary sources that Illustrate details Emotions

Map Activities

  • Research the Internet to find information about Liberty Burns. Write an essay that gives information about Liberty’s life before, during, and after the Civil War.

  • Identify at least ten battles that the 105th Regiment fought in. Then, use a map from the Civil War time period to plot the locations of these battles.

  • Locate at least one example of a map as a primary source related to the Civil War . Make sure to include a completed SEA Method Worksheet.


Civil war primary source portfolio your project revisited
Civil War Primary Source Portfolio: Your Project Revisited Emotions

Civil War Primary Source Portfolio Details:

  • All of your materials will be presented in a binder that I will provide for you.

  • You will create a title page with a title, your name, and a Civil War-related primary source.

  • Make sure to include a table of contents page.

  • You will complete a total of seven activities, one for each type of primary source presented in this slide show.

  • You will include a total of seven primary sources that you located, one for each type of primary source presented in this slide show. You need to include Primary sources with a local emphasis as well.

  • Please remember to include a completed analysis worksheet for each primary source that you located.

  • You will need to complete the Civil War Primary Source Portfolio Self-Assessment Worksheet. Remember to use complete sentences in your responses.

  • Include a works cited page.


ad