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Kingdom Animalia. Invertebrates. Table of Contents. Phylum Arthopoda Subphylum Chelicerata Subphylum Crustacea Subphylum Uniramia Phylum Echinodermata. Phylum Porifera Phylum Cnidaria Phylum Ctenophora Phylum Platyhelminthes Phylum Rotifera Phylum Nematoda Phylum Mollusca

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Kingdom Animalia

Invertebrates


Table of contents
Table of Contents

  • Phylum Arthopoda

  • Subphylum Chelicerata

  • Subphylum Crustacea

  • Subphylum Uniramia

  • Phylum Echinodermata

  • Phylum Porifera

  • Phylum Cnidaria

  • Phylum Ctenophora

  • Phylum Platyhelminthes

  • Phylum Rotifera

  • Phylum Nematoda

  • Phylum Mollusca

  • Phylum Annelida

*martin


Phylum porifera

Back

Phylum Porifera

(“Pore-bearer” - Sponges)

Classes

Major Characteristics

  • Asymmetrical

  • Spongin and spicules make up skeleton and lack tissue and organs

  • Osculum, an opening at the top of the sponge gathers food

  • Reproduce both sexually and asexually

  • Sessile

  • Diffusion of oxygen through cells

  • Marine

  • Two germ layers

*Crew

About the Phylum

  • Simplest invertebrates

  • Made up of sponges

  • Comes from the Latin word “Pore-bearer”

*Johnson


Back

Classes of Porifera

Class Calcarea

(Calcareous Sponges)

These sponges live in marine shallow watered habitats. They are very small (usually only a few inches) but they are brightly colored. They are also very rough textured. Their spicules are composed of calcium carbonate. Some fossils of these can be found near the shore of tropical islands but some have been known to be found 4000 ft in the ocean.

Class Demospongiae(Demosponges)

These sponges can live in both fresh water and ocean water. They bore themselves on rocks and mollusks. They are very small but this class also contains the majority of Sponges. They are a soft yellow color and usually spend there lives in tunnels or shallow waters.

*Remsem

Class Hexactinellida(Glass Sponges)

These sponges live in the deep sea and are cup-like and are a pale color. These sponges supply a home for many varieties of shrimp. They are characterized by their siliceous spicules. These are the only sponges that do not have the ability to contract. However, they have electrical impulses that allow them to react quickly to external stimuli. They live anywhere between 200 and 1000 m in the Antarctic.

Houseman*

*Madl


Phylum cnidaria

Back

Phylum Cnidaria

(“Stinging cells” - Jellyfish, Corals, etc.)

Economic Importance

Classes

Major Characteristics

They do not impact the economy directly but they do impact fishing industries. Therefore they impact humans in a negative way.

  • Radially symmetrical

  • Two cell layers

  • Cnidocytes for capturing prey

  • Reproduce sexually and asexually

  • Can be polyps or medusas

  • Live in oceans or freshwater

  • Diffusion of oxygen through tissues

About the Phylum

*Radar

  • Cells are organized into tissues

  • Have few simple organs

  • Aquatic invertebrates

*Aquascope


Classes of cnidaria

Back

Classes of Cnidaria

Class Anthozoa

(Anenomies, Corals, etc)

Also known as “flower animals”. They live only as polyps but are brightly colored. They shelter many different kinds of animals.

Class Hydrozoa

(Portuguese Man Of War, Obelia, etc)

Hydrozoas can live as polyps, medusa, or mixed colonies. Some are hermaphrodites and some just have separate genders. They also produce both sexually and asexually.

Lab*

*Crawford

Class Cubozoa

(Box Jellies)

Known as “Sea Wasps”. They can be found only in Australia and other tropical places and are known for their venom. They are named for their cube-shaped Medusa.

Class Scyphozoa

(Jellyfish)

Jellyfish are the main invertebrates of this class. They spend most of their time as medusas and are known as “cup animals”.

*Nilsson

*Kay


Phylum ctenophora

Back

Phylum Ctenophora

(“Comb Holder” - Nonstinging Jellies)

Economic Importance

Pictures

Major Characteristics

Species in this phylum affect humans in many ways. First of all, they greatly control the plankton population underwater. They also make beautiful sights for people to look at when they go diving or snorkeling. Finally, they represent an important step in pelagic organic matter transformations.

  • Radially Symmetrical

  • Apical Organ

  • Colloblasts

  • Hermaphrodite, asexually, and sexually

  • Medusa

  • Marine

  • Live in a protective shell until they hatch

  • Diffusion of oxygen through tissues

About the Phylum

  • More complex than sponges

  • Live in the Ocean

  • Includes 100 species

*Messmore

*Anderson


Pictures of ctenophora

Back

Pictures of Ctenophora

*Taylor

*Schories

*Schories


Phylum platyhelminthes

Back

Phylum Platyhelminthes

(Flatworms)

Economic Importance

Classes

Major Characteristics

Species in this Phylum have very little economic importance to humans. They can in fact make people sick and die, other than that they’re pretty pointless to us, how sad.

  • Bilateral Symmetry

  • Excretory, nervous, and reproductive systems

  • Live off hosts

  • Asexual, hermaphrodites

  • Free living

  • Inside of a host

  • Diffusion of oxygen through tissues

About the Phylum

  • More complex than previous phylums

  • Simplest animals with bilateral symmetry

  • Has three classes

*PLP


Classes of platyhelminthes

Back

Classes of Platyhelminthes

Class Trematoda/Monogenea

(Flukes)

The species in these class are parasitic flukes. They are similar to the species in Class Turbellaria in the way they look but are different in the since that instead of living in waters they live inside of a hosts body.

Class Cestoidea

(Tapeworms)

The species in this class are tapeworms. Tapeworms are sucky things to get in your body because they live in your intestines and feed off of you. They are also very ribbon-like in structure and have little suckers.

Class Turbellaria

(Free Living Worms)

Most species in this class are dwellers in marine and freshwaters. They live on rocks, sand, and vegetation. They have a thick mucus that covers their entire body and protects them from harm.

UoA*

Gills*

*UoA


Phylum rotifera

Back

Phylum Rotifera

(Spiny-headed Worms)

Economic Importance

Pictures

Major Characteristics

There really isn’t one, they pretty much just exist.

  • Bilateral symmetry

  • Sensory organs and nerve cells

  • Eats through a single opening

  • sexually

  • Free living

  • Lives inside of a host

  • Diffusion of oxygen through tissues

About the Phylum

  • Contain a fluid-filled space

  • Has a space that holds internal organs

  • Also serves as a protective storage area

*Random

Sorenson*


Pictures of rotifera

Back

Pictures of Rotifera

*Tsukii

*Storenson

*Tsukii

*ELI


Phylum nematoda

Back

Phylum Nematoda

(Roundworms)

Economic Importance

Pictures

Major Characteristics

Once again, there really isn’t one, they pretty much just exist. They also make you sick.

  • Bilateral Symmetry

  • Excretory, nervous, and reproductive systems

  • Live off hosts

  • Asexual, hermaphrodites

  • Free living

  • Inside of a host

  • Diffusion of oxygen through tissues

About the Phylum

  • Contain a fluid-filled space

  • Has a space that holds internal organs

  • Also serves as a protective storage area

*Tsukii


Pictures of nematoda

Back

Pictures of Nematoda

*BSC

*Apoc

*???

*CSIRO


Phylum mollusca

Back

Phylum Mollusca

(“Soft-bodied” - Mollusks)

Economic Importance

Classes

Major Characteristics

  • Oysters and Blue Muscles have an economic importance because they’re good to eat. Also the Zebra Muscle can be a pest.

  • Bilateral System

  • Nervous, Circulatory systems

  • Filter feeding, and fast moving predators

  • Sexually

  • Some swim, some are sessile, and some crawl on ocean floors

  • Oceans

  • Diffusion of oxygen through tissues

About the Phylum

  • Latin name meaning “Soft”

  • Have soft bodies and hard shells

*Filer


Classes of mollusca

Back

Classes of Mollusca

Class Cephalopoda

(Octopus)

This class includes octopuses, squids, and cuttlefishes. They are marine animals that specialize in free swimming and predatory existence. They have tentacles with powerful suction cups that allow them to grasp objects and capture prey.

Class Gastropoda

(Snails)

The largest and most diverse class of mollusks. This class includes snails, abalones, and conches. These have shells but some animals in this class do not have shells including slugs.

*Dafni

Class Bivalvia

(Muscles)

This class includes all aquatic mollusks like clams, oysters, and scallops. They contain a powerful adductor muscle that attaches to valves. This muscle opens and closes the organisms protective shell so it can eat.

Conquiliobiologistas*

Wikipedia*


Phylum annelida

Back

Phylum Annelida

(“Little ring” - Earthworms, etc.)

Economic Importance

Classes

Major Characteristics

Leeches are used in medical labs to help suck bad blood out of people. So they are medically important.

  • Bilaterally symmetrical

  • Circulatory, respiratory, and nervous systems

  • In jest soil as they burrow into it

  • Sexually

  • Locomotion by tails

  • Dirt

  • Diffusion of oxygen through tissues

About the Phylum

  • Term means “Little Rings”

  • Means many body segments

  • Consists of 15,000 different species

*Anderson


Classes of annelida

Back

Classes of Annelida

Class Polychaeta

(Bristle Worm)

They have antennae and specialized mouthparts, they are free-swimming predators with strong jaws. They live in the dirt on ocean floors.

*Gills

Class Hirudinea

(Leeches)

This is the smallest class of Annelids and it contains leeches. They can be found in muddy waters and they attach to you and suck your blood. They have no parapodia or setae

*Bakken

Class Oligochaeta

(Earthworm)

These creatures live in the soil and have a few setae on each segment. They lead a burrowing life. They are also good for fishing!

*Fankboner

*Fauna


Phylum arthropoda

Back

Phylum Arthropoda

(“Jointed foot” - Crabs, spiders, insects, etc.)

Economic Importance

  • Chilicerata

  • Crustacea

  • Uniramia

Insects are important to the economy because they eat crops, spread diseases, and destroy clothing. So they’re pretty much some bad little creatures!

Major Characteristics

About the Phylum

  • Bilateral symmetry

  • A lot of organs like humans such as a gizzard, circulatory system, and nervous system, etc.

  • Use of setae and parapodia

  • Sexually

  • Free living

  • Marine

  • Diffusion of oxygen through tissues and primitive tracheal structures

  • ¾ of all animals belong to this phylum

  • Can adapt to almost ever environment

  • Means “Jointed Foot”


Subphylum chelicerata

Back to Phylum

Back to Menu

Subphylum Chelicerata

(Mites, Scorpions, Sea Spiders, etc.)

Classes

*Haaramo

About the Subphylum

  • They have compound eyes

  • They feed on algae and other things

  • Most are carnivorous

  • Most of the information for this subphylum is in the classes

  • Their legs bear claws

  • Some species are marine, some are land living, some are extinct

  • Bodies are divided into two main parts

  • Eyes are covered by a thick cornea

*Neartica

*Haaramo


Classes of chelicerata

Back

Classes of Chelicerata

Class Arachnida

(spiders)

Have about six pairs of jointed appendages, and pedipalps which help them hold food and chewing. They also have four pairs of walking legs. They mostly live on land.

*Random

Class Pycnogonida

(sea spiders)

This class contains the “weirdest” looking arthropods. Another name for it is “all legs” which is appropriate because they have small bodies with lots of long legs. They also feed on soft body invertebrates

*Wegg

Class Merostomata

(Horseshoe crabs)

This class actually contains two different types of marine life forms. One of which is now extinct and has been extinct for 200 to 500 million years. Now there are only 5 species that live in this class.

*Yale


Subphylum crustacea

Back to Phylum

Back to Menu

Subphylum Crustacea

(Lobsters, Crabs, Barnacles, etc.)

Pictures

*Museum

About the Subphylum

  • Contains approximately 40,000 species.

  • Abundant in oceans, lakes, rivers, and a few species are found on legs

  • Some are sessile and some move by walking on legs, swimming, or drifting through currents

  • They have two pairs of appendages. One on their head served as a feeler.

*Museum

  • The embryo is a free swimming larva called a nauplius.

  • Some species of this subphylum are very important plankton

  • Water fleas and barnacles are also in this subphylum

  • Some exchange carbon dioxide and oxygen through their skeleton some respire with gills

*Museum

*Museum


Pictures of crustacea

Back

Pictures of Crustacea

*Corporation

*Museum

*Janetzky


Subphylum uniramia

Back to Phylum

Back to Menu

Subphylum Uniramia

(Centipedes, insects, etc.)

Classes

*Random3

*Random3

About the Subphylum

  • Classes of this subphylum are usually called myriapods.

  • Includes insects, millipedes, centipedes, and their relatives

  • Their legs only have one branch

  • Subphylum only includes “true” arthropods

  • Make up the most common and diverse classes of arthropods.

  • They have exoskeletons and jointed appendages

  • Their heads include antennas and mandibles

  • They also have two pairs of maxillae

  • Their sexes are separate but reproduction varies

*Random2


Classes of uniramia

Back

Classes of Uniramia

Class Chilopoda

(centipedes)

They can have anywhere between 15 and 175 pairs of legs. They live in tropical regions. They are quick moving and search for prey like earthworms and other insects.

*Fankboner

Class Diplopoda

(millipedes)

Move slowly through humus and soil, have two pairs of legs on each body segment except the last two. Have poor vision and a good sense of smell. When threatened they coil up.

*Mitchell

Class Insecta

(insects)

They are moist, live in many different regions. Composed of entirely of insects with over 29 different orders. They are the most successful life forms on the planet with their ability to adapt to almost anything, anywhere.

  • Orders

  • 1

  • 2

  • 3

*Museum2


Orders of class insecta

Back

Orders of Class Insecta

Order Thysanura

(Firebrats)

Contains over 2400 different species, They have chewing mouth parts. They feed on paste in wallpaper and starch in book bindings and labels.

Order Ephemeroptera

(Mayflies)

Contains 1,500 species. They have membranous wings, and nonfunctioning mouthparts as adults.

*BMW

*Ojibway

Order Odonata

(Dragonflies)

Contains 20,000 species. They destroy harmful insects, and serve as food for a lot of freshwater fish.

*Mitchell

Order Isoptera

(Termites)

Contains 2000 species, at times they have two pairs of membranous wings, and chewing mouthparts.

Order Orthopera

(Crickets)

Contains 30,000 species. They have two pairs of straight wings and chewing mouthparts. They damage crops, garden plants, and stored foods

*PCA

*Ento


Orders of class insecta1

Back

Orders of Class Insecta

Order Anoplura

(Lice)

Over 2400 species, they have an incomplete metamorphosis. They are wingless with piercing, sucking mouthparts. They transmit diseases.

Order Dermaptera

(Earwigs)

Contains 1000 different species. They have an incomplete metamorphosis. They also have two pairs of wings, biting mouthparts, and pincer like appendages.

*Iowa

*TatorTots

Order Neuroptera

(dobsonfly)

Contains 4,600 species. They destroy harmful insects. Larvae serve as food for freshwater fish.

*West

*Virginia

Order Hemiptera

(True Bugs)

Contains 2,000 species. They have two pairs of wings during part of their life and damage crops and garden plants.

*WTB

Order Homoptera

(aphids)

Contains 20,000 species and some species are wingless. They have membranous wings held like roof over body.


Orders of class insecta2

Back

Orders of Class Insecta

Order Lepidoptera

(Butterflies)

They have a complete metamorphosis. They pollination flowers, larvae and pupae produce silk.

*Mitchell

Order Coleoptera

(Weevils)

Over 500,000 different species. Has forewings, membranous hind wings, and chewing mouthparts.

Order Diptera

(Gnats)

Contains 80,000 species. Has a complete metamorphosis. Carry diseases and act as decomposers Also, they destroy crops.

*North

Order Hymenoptera

(Bees)

Contains 90,000 species. Has biting, sucking, or lapping mouthparts. Many have constriction between thorax and abdomen. Some species are social like bees. Pollinates flowers and makes honey. They also destroy harmful insects.

*Cunningham

Order Siphonaptera

(Fleas)

Contains 1,200 species. Wingless and has sucking mouthparts as an adult, when a larvae it has chewing mouthparts. Parasitize birds and mammals and carry diseases.

*BBK

LogUK*


Phylum echinodermata

Back

Phylum Echinodermata

(“Spiny skin” - Sea Stars, Sea Urchins, Etc.)

Classes

About the Phylum

Major Characteristics

  • Contains invertebrates from shallow coastal waters to ocean trenches more than 10,000 ft deep

  • Often brilliantly colored

  • Vary in diameter from 1cm to 1m

  • Radially Symmetrical

  • Water-vascular system (tube feet)

  • Take in food & internally digest it

  • Sexually

  • Sessile

  • Marine

  • Develop from bilaterally symmetrical larvae

  • Diffusion of oxygen through tissues

Economic Importance

Sea Stars are important because they eat oysters, and other things that humans use for food.

*Cincotta


Classes of echinodermata

Back

Classes of Echinodermata

Class Holothuroidea

(Sea Cucumbers)

Most of the organisms in this class are armless and have ossicles that make up their skeleton. They are found in the ocean and use tentacles to eat and clean itself.

Class Crinoidea

(Sea Lilies, Feather Stars)

These organisms are “lily-like”. They are sessile as adults, living on rocks or the bottom of the sea as long stalks. They use cilia to eat.

Class Echinoidea

(Sea Urchins, Sand Dollars)

These organisms are “spine like”. They live on sea bottoms and are well adapted to it. Sea Dollars also live on the sea coasts.

*UCMP

*Jonnson

Class Ophiuroidia

(Basket Stars, Brittle Stars)

Over 2000 species of basket and brittle stars make up this class. They mostly live on the ocean floor and rake food in their mouth to eat.

Class Asteroidea

(Sea Stars)

Sea Stars live in the coastal waters and are many different beautiful colors.

*HCCMS

Zubi*

*TSJIG


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