Healthy homes carbon monoxide fire issues
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Healthy Homes: Carbon Monoxide & Fire Issues. Richard E. Taylor, Senior Research & Planning Analyst Office of the Maine Fire Marshal. Carbon Monoxide in the Home. Average # of ED hospital visits p/year: 88 High: 121 Low: 78 Age: no pattern Gender: 61% female

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Healthy Homes: Carbon Monoxide & Fire Issues

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Healthy homes carbon monoxide fire issues

Healthy Homes: Carbon Monoxide & Fire Issues

Richard E. Taylor, Senior Research & Planning Analyst

Office of the Maine Fire Marshal


Carbon monoxide in the home

Carbon Monoxide in the Home

  • Average # of ED hospital visits p/year: 88

    • High: 121 Low: 78

    • Age: no pattern

    • Gender: 61% female

  • Average # of ED hospitalizations p/year: 7

    • High: 13 Low: 4

    • Age: no pattern

    • Gender: no pattern

  • Average # of deaths p/year: 3

    • High: 5 Low: 0


What we know about co

What we know about CO

The majority of these accidents occur in single family dwellings or apartments due to the build up of CO in the dwelling from heating appliances that are installed improperly, maintained poorly, or misused. These problems result in improper venting.

Generators and vehicles running in closed spaces have also caused problems.

Build up results in nausea and headache (without fever), and eventually confusion, coma and death.


What we can do about co

What we can do about CO

Hardwire (with battery backup) CO detectors on wall in areas giving access to bedrooms at face level in homes.

Have a professional install all heating appliances so that they are installed as directed in the manufacturers instructions and limit use of fuel fired portable heaters.

Operate heating appliances only as directed in the manufacturers instructions.

Have a professional clean and maintain heating appliances (and chimneys) as directed in the manufacturers instructions.


How do we make it happen laws rules or policy other

How do we make it happen?Laws, rules or policy? Other?

  • Provide clear statutory authority to incorporate workable standards for installation, maintenance, and operation in rule.

  • Educate the public about these laws and rules and why we have them through direct education efforts and through public awareness campaigns.


Fire basic fire loss measures

Fire:Basic Fire Loss Measures

Typical Groupings From USFA & NFPA Reports

  • Fires

  • Fire Deaths (civilian & firefighter)

  • Fire Injuries (civilian & firefighter)

  • Property & Contents Loss ($ amount)

    * The cumulative social and economic cost of these measures is your Fire Burden


Healthy homes carbon monoxide fire issues

Over the last 10 years Maine has averaged 17.5 fatalities per year. In the 80’s and early 90’s the rate of fire death in Maine was higher than the national average. Now it is lower.

2009 - 9 Deaths. An all time low!


Healthy homes carbon monoxide fire issues

75 hospitalizations per year.

500+ outpatient treatments

Peak months: May, June, July, August & January for both hospitalizations/outpatient

Age: 15 – 54 = 68%, 65+= 20%


Some facts

Some Facts

  • Most fires are outdoors

  • Most structure (building) fires are in single family dwellings

  • The most costly fires are in single family dwellings

    • Leading cause: heating followed by cooking

    • Most fatals (historically caused by smoking)

    • In terms of fire fatality, older adults comprise 33 – 50% or greater deaths in these structures

  • Children are involved in 300 fire ignitions annually (most are outdoors near the home)


Our role

Remedies for your Fire Burden

Law Enforcement ?

Code Development & Enforcement?

Public Fire Prevention & Safety Education ?

Public Fire Prevention & Safety Awareness ?

Our Role


The environment

The Environment

Attributes of:

  • Pre-ignition physical environment

    • Clutter, blocked egress, lighters/matches, mitigation systems in place?

  • Pre-ignition behavioral environment

    • Age (child, older adult), alcohol/drug use

  • Post ignition physical and behavioral environment – what did people do? Were they alerted? How did the pre-ignition situation play out?


Human proximity

Human Proximity

  • Class 1: Direct (proximate) human involvement in the ignition in a structure fire

  • Class 2: Indirect (non-proximate) human involvement in the ignition of a structure fire

  • Class 3: Class 1 & 2 for outdoor fires


Resources

Maine State Fire Marshal’s Office

Research and Reports

Annual Reports

USFA – “Fire In the US Report

NFPA – “Cost of Fire in the US

–“Total Fire Loss In the US”

Resources


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