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Observations and Inferences. Two Tools Every Scientist Needs Charlottesville City Schools October, 2005. Observation. An observation is a fact learned “directly” through the senses. Sight, touch, smell, taste, and hearing

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Observations and inferences

Observations and Inferences

Two Tools Every Scientist Needs

Charlottesville City Schools

October, 2005


Observation
Observation

  • An observation is a fact learned “directly” through the senses.

    • Sight, touch, smell, taste, and hearing

  • Observations are personal experiences since they are influenced by your past experiences.

  • The more we observe, the more we learn.


Inferences
Inferences

  • Inferences are conclusions and explanations about events that are not directly observed.

    • Inferences are based on observations.

    • Scientists often make more than one inference to explain an observation.

    • New observations can either support or negate inferences.


Let s make an observation
Let’s make an observation

  • You will have 30 seconds to observe the next slide.

  • After you have looked at the slide, write down your observations on your worksheet.

    • Use as many details as possible

    • Work quickly…you will have I minute to complete all of your observations.

  • Ready?

  • Let’s begin!


Time is up

Time is up!!!

Let’s share our observations, but be an active listener…don’t repeat what was already stated.


Now let s make an inference
Now, let’s make an inference.

  • Using your observations, what sounds do you think you would hear if you were looking at the actual scene, not a picture of this scene?

  • Let’s make another observation of this scene.


Did your second observation cause you to change your thoughts about what you inferred you might hear?

If you want to modify your inference, change it now.


Let s make another observation
Let’s make another observation. thoughts about what you inferred you might hear?


Do you still think you will hear the same sounds
Do you still think you will hear the same sounds? thoughts about what you inferred you might hear?

Let’s make another observation.


How about now change your inference now if you want
How about now? Change your inference now if you want. thoughts about what you inferred you might hear?

Let’s make one last observation…


What inferences can you make about the setting
What inferences can you make about the setting? thoughts about what you inferred you might hear?


Now let s look at something else what do you see
Now let’s look at something else… thoughts about what you inferred you might hear?what do you see?


Let s look at something else
Let’s look at something else… thoughts about what you inferred you might hear?


Look at the following figure
Look at the following figure. thoughts about what you inferred you might hear?


Now look at the next figure
Now look at the next figure. thoughts about what you inferred you might hear?


Images used in this presentation were taken from the following:Block, J. Richard & Yuker, Harold (1989). Can You Believe Your Eyes? New York: Gardner Press.Banyai, Istvan (1995). RE-Zoom. New York: Viking.


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