Startalk outreach session sunday october 17 2009
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STARTALK Outreach Session Sunday October 17, 2009. Outreach Round Table. Najoua Hotard PhD: I.C.L.C.E Outreach Examples High School Residential Arabic Language Programs. Definition of Outreach.

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Startalk outreach session sunday october 17 2009

STARTALK Outreach SessionSunday October 17, 2009


Outreach round table

Outreach Round Table

Najoua Hotard PhD:

I.C.L.C.E Outreach Examples

High School Residential Arabic Language Programs


Definition of outreach

Definition of Outreach

  • Outreach is the act of reaching out; an effort to build connections from one person or group to another. STARTALK outreach is to engage all STARTALK programs in outreach activities that generate knowledge, share resources, and apply the expertise of STARTALK leaders in ways that advance both the public good and STARTALK mission.

  • It is an integral part of the National initiative to enable our youth to become global citizens. STARTALK educational outreach mission seeks to broaden the scope of current programs and connect them with other State Department programs. STARTALK Outreach mission also seeks to engage all educational K-12 educators, post-secondary institutions, media, business, government agencies, and the general community.

  • Outreach is by no means an add-on activity”; it is a central component that demonstrates STARTALK commitment to sustaining high-quality outreach programming to provide equitable high caliber critical language programs to all students and all groups in our country through the journey of global citizenship.

  • STARTALK outreach programs stress Equity in the context of No CHILD LEFT BEHHIND. We value DIVERSITY. All students regardless of ethnic, racial, physical or mental challenges, social economic status, or region are welcome if they are US citizens or Permanent Residents. (Diversity is another component of outreach that we have to keep in mind as a federally sponsored program paid for by all TAX payers).


Best outreach practices

Best Outreach Practices

  • Stage 1: Define and identify the population and community your STARTALK program will serve.

    • Recognize and make contact with target group members.

    • Explain the mission of STARTALK outreach program and establish trust.

    • Follow up contact and meeting with those helping your mission.

    • Work and collaborate with other community service providers.

    • Stage 2: Begin with mass releases of content first. This will have a larger impact and makes future cooperation more likely to occur.

      • Make sure information about the program is well explained and that the program depends on funding of the proposal.

      • Give your contact information, not that of those who are helping you in your endeavors.

      • Touch base often with a short thank you, email, Christmas card, Starbucks gift card, etc.

        • Stage 3: Don’t worry, be happy and passionate.

          • Executing a cooperation to expand your STARTALK program will be rewarding if you do not see it as a source of stress

          • Evaluate your progress and adjust your expectations.

          • Make sure your cooperation partners are happy as well.

          • Word of mouth, CAN and will be the most important tool in your ongoing outreach activities.

          • Talk about your cooperation so that others can hear about it and learn from it.

          • If the press covers your program, make sure you express appreciation to all those who helped in the outreach activities.


I c l c e outreach experience

I.C.L.C.E Outreach Experience

  • Guiding Principles:

    • It is not a one day event. It has to be an ongoing mission.

    • Do not wait for people to come to you or run across your website by chance. Go to them.

    • Establish a network of volunteers Recruit volunteers (co-workers, STARTALK alumni students, neighbors, family members).

    • Make it clear that the program depends on funding.

    • DO NOT WAIT until the announcement of proposal acceptance is made. ICLCE plans to offer STARTALK Arabic summer classes, please fill out the application online or send your name if interested. You will be noted if funds are granted.

    • ICLCE loves Google. Get contact info of all schools in the United States if your program is residential.

    • ICLCE website includes links talking about your program’s previous success.

    • Add meaning to community partners contributions in outreach efforts. ICLCE thanks outreach activity's helpers for implementing ACTFL’s COMMUNITIES Standards and Benchmarks of foreign language instruction.

    • Send your program t-shirt to those who help. Wear a t-shirt when you travel or go to community functions.


I c l c e strategic plan

I.C.L.C.E Strategic Plan

  • ICLCE offers high school residential programs.

  • Outreach activities target:

    • Formal groups and specific population: High school students, foreign language entities, state departments of educations, department heads of schools, and community college leaders

    • Informal groups

      • Churches, mosques, synagogues ,Hindi temple Buddhist temples, and non-profit organizations supporting global citizenship, Lion’s club, YMCA, BREC, Boys and girls club, Chamber of Commerce, Choctaw Indian tribe center, movie theater Saturday afternoon, literary rallies on LSU and Southern Universities campuses, Magnet Mania exhibits in malls ( it is a rally trying to get students to enroll in Magnet programs), exhibits at the Archives building for talented Art students, State fairs,

      • Friday vegetable market events (help you reach rural area students),earth day celebration; heritage festival in Lafayette and Baton Rouge, strawberry festival, voodoo festival in New Orleans, Jazz Festival Blues Festival, weekly Saturday afternoon open air concerts organized by city, )


Examples of posters and flyers

Examples of Posters and Flyers

  • Colorful posters on telephone pole in heavily trafficked intersections.

    • “Can you read this عربي? If you cant.. Visit www.iclce.org.”

    • “We are the STARTALKERS and we want YOU! Visit us at www.iclce.org.”

    • “Tired of Star Trekkers? Let’s ing”

    • “STARTALKERS are people too ज़बान-एعربي白話/白话 آ, با”

    • “We speak in tongues: ज़बान-एعربي白話/白话we ”

    • “Ask me about STARTALKERS…My child is one of them!”


I c l c e cost effective strategies

I.C.L.C.E Cost Effective Strategies

  • Local Level

    • School newspapers, free local papers and magazines, supermarkets and shopping centers, free local newspapers, signs next to health clubs, movie theaters, school TV networks, PBS, invite papers to opening and closing ceremonies, give parents a pre-written press release, fund raiser, ask alumni STARTALK students to wear tee-shirts and help at elderly home, at a community service activity.

  • State Level:

    • Invite state officials; contact all school counselors by e-mail and fliers, e-mail special education centers, foreign language associations, foreign language department chairpersons, community fairs, state rallies and language competitions, exchange website advertisement with businesses and non-profit organizations .

  • National and International Level

    • STARTALK is an integral part of the National Language Initiatives. We have to make CONNECTIONS that energize our programs and empower our students. Membership in EXCHANGES CONNECT international social network will provide an array of high order thinking activities and group discussions that will enrich the COMMUNITIES benchmark that will connect communities on the local level and abroad. Most importantly, EXCHANGES CONNECT will reinforce language and cultural proficiencies beyond summer program as it allows students to interact with people from other countries and programs provided by NSLI-Y and American youth who participated in these programs. The OUTREACH mission of STARTALK is to Connect American youth with all the wonderful opportunities organized by the U.S. State department to become true Global citizens capable of negotiating their own cultural identity.

    • These are some other windows open to the world. For instance the Council on International visitors has great trunks of authentic materials that can be borrowed by programs for a very small fee, as well as professionally and pedagogically well developed units. We can see STARTALK outreach initiatives as the spring of fresh water that nourishes the fields of flowers on the path of global citizenship and cultural understanding journey. Michele, the administrator of the project sent me pamphlets to share at the conference.  She is a wonderful and helpful young lady who has done a lot for ICLCE/STARTALK participants and for me personally.

http://exchanges.state.gov/youth/programs/nsli.html

Congressman Bill Cassidy with student. ICLCE 2009.

http://www.nciv.org/

National Clearinghouse on Disability and Exchange

http://www.miusa.org/ncde

http://connect.state.gov/

http://www.uscenterforcitizendiplomacy.org/

http://coalitionforcitizendiplomacy.org/


Evidence of success 1

Evidence of Success 1

Article 1: On first page of the LSU website

Link: http://www.lsu.edu/highlights/2008/08/STARTALK.html

Baton Rouge, Louisiana | Wednesday, October 21, 2009

CURRENT STORIES : STARTALK Treatment

Students Learning Arabic in an Engaging, Unique program

By: Kristine Calongne | LSU Office of Public Affairs Summer 2008 

RELATED LINKS:

STARTALK ProgramNational Security Language InitiativeNational Foreign Language CenterInstitute of Critical Languages and Cultural Exchange

LSU Flagship Agenda

Professor Adel El-Daba of the University of Cairo spent the summer at LSU, teaching high school students from across the United States to speak Arabic as part of the national STARTALK program. His engaging teaching methods included singing to the students in Arabic and encouraging them to create a rap song to help them learn the Arabic alphabet.

STARTALK Treatment

Students Learning Arabic in an Engaging, Unique program

When people from across the United States think of South Louisiana, they tend to think of Cajun culture, crawfish boils and zydeco music. But this summer, 25 high school students from around the nation traveled to LSU to spend six weeks immersing themselves -- not in Cajun culture – but in all things Arabic.

The students came to LSU as part of the STARTALK program, one of the projects of the National Security Language Initiative, which is a multi-agency effort to expand foreign language education in under-taught critical languages. The initiative funds new and existing language programs for students at all educational levels, from kindergarten through college, as well as professional development opportunities for teachers of these critical languages. In addition, it provides incentives and rewards for foreign language learning and use in the work force. Along with Arabic, the initiative also promotes the teaching of Chinese, Hindi, Persian and Urdu.

The students based at LSU lived on campus for six weeks and learned to speak, read and write Arabic with the help of several engaging and energetic professors from around the globe. They also learned about the Arabic culture and the importance of proper pronunciation in Arabic. The intensive course enabled the students to earn additional high school course credits.

The $100,000 STARTALK grant was awarded to the Institute of Critical Languages & Cultural Exchange in Baton Rouge and was administered by the National Foreign Language Center at the University of Maryland. LSU served as a partner in the grant and as the host site for the program, which was titled, “Al-BabMaftooh: Arabic Proficiency within Cultural Dimensions.”

The program was led by Najoua Hotard, founder and president of the Institute of Critical Languages and Cultural Exchange, who also served as one of the Arabic teachers. “The goal of this program is not only to teach these students to read and write this language, but also to help them understand this culture and be good ambassadors,” Hotard said.

Several LSU faculty and staff were involved in the program, including Mechanical Engineering Professor and Associate Vice Chancellor for Strategic Initiatives Su-Seng Pang and coordinator in the Office of Strategic Initiatives Anthony Picado.

One of the more dynamic teachers in the program was Adel El-Daba, professor at the University of Cairo and chair of world languages at the American College in Cairo. El-Daba was fully engaged with the students, leading them in chants, songs and other memory tricks to help them learn the Arabic language. He even sang parts of the Koran to the students in Arabic to demonstrate how musical the language is, and encouraged the students to create a rap song to help them remember the Arabic alphabet. The students seemed to love it, and even drummed and danced along with the song.

“I am impressed by the kids we have here and feel so privileged to teach them,” El-Daba said.

He spent a great deal of time helping the students with their pronunciation of Arabic words and teaching them the history and origin of words so they could better understand the language. “Arabic is such a very rich language,” he told his students. “Arabic words carry a lot of weight."

During one class, El-Daba stood atop his desk and asked the class to shout out the words to describe his actions. Later, he borrowed a student’s cell phone and had a make-believe conversation in English and then Arabic to demonstrate the differences between the two languages. The result was a group of students who were completely wrapped up in the learning process.

Both Hotard and El-Daba stressed the importance of teaching the Arabic language and culture. “The best way to get peace with others is to understand them, and language is the key,” El-Daba said.

For more information on the Institute of Critical Languages & Cultural Exchange, visit http://www.iclce.org/. For more information on the STARTALK program, visit http://startalk.umd.edu/program-info/2008/.


Evidence of success 2

Evidence of Success 2

Article 2: U.S. Students Learn Arabic Through STARTALK Program

Link: http://newsblaze.com/story/20081021084423tsop.nb/topstory.html

U.S. Students Learn Arabic Through STARTALK Program

http://newsblaze.com/story/20081021084423tsop.nb/topstory.html

By Michele Scheib

Inspired by world events, literature and places they would like to explore, more students in the United States are studying less traditional languages.

The STARTALK Summer Institutes, a project of the federally funded National Security Language Initiative, makes instruction in Arabic, Chinese, Hindi, Persian and Urdu more available nationally for students at all grade levels. The program also provides additional training for teachers of these critical languages.

One STARTALK institute at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge brought together students with and without disabilities to work together to learn Arabic and to explore Arabic culture through multimedia presentations, field trips and lectures guided by scholars from the United States and abroad.

The students in the Baton Rouge institute - one of 81 STARTALK projects for 2008 - each received a scholarship for books, supplies and room and board, as well as a small stipend and use of all facilities at Louisiana State University.

Najoua Hotard, Arabic adjunct professor at Loyola and Tulane universities in New Orleans, selected the 25 students, including five who had disabilities, to participate in the Baton Rouge program.

"I am very proud that STARTALK allows us to reach all students," Hotard said. "Every educational system needs to learn about the benefits and richness of a classroom characterized by diversity."

A DESIRE TO LEARN NEW LANGUAGES

Almost 60 percent of middle and high school students in the United States are "somewhat willing" to "very willing" to learn Arabic or other foreign languages not commonly studied in the U.S. schools, according to the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages.

Another study found that among first-year college students with disabilities, 24 percent have already completed a foreign language course by their spring semester and another 38 percent plan to take a foreign language. By their senior year, half of college students with disabilities have completed a foreign language course, according to unpublished results from the 2006 National Survey on Student Engagement, conducted among first-year and senior-year students at U.S. post-secondary institutions.

One of the students taking part in the five-week STARTALK Arabic program in Baton Rouge was Monica Torrez, who attends Riverside Community College in California. "The Arabic alphabet and learning how to connect the written letters together was the easiest for me," said Torrez, who also knows Spanish. "The most difficult was to conjugate the verbs and learn the sounds that the letters make."

Torrez, a special education major, served as a one-on-one assistant to Jemila, a high school student with autism taking the course.

"If Jemila was stuck, she came to me for help. She sometimes got stressed if she didn't understand what was going on in class," said Torrez, who added that Jemila's Arabic language skills improved in the program. "When I asked her about the class, she said she loved it and wanted to continue learning Arabic."

Everett Walker, an 18-year-old with diabetes and a mobility disability who also studied at the Baton Rouge institute, hopes to use his Arabic to serve his country by doing intelligence work for the U.S. government. "In class, we gained more and more knowledge. It's not just about speaking, but also about the culture as a whole," Walker said.

Shoeb Khan, a computer science major who uses a power wheelchair and already speaks Hindi and English, participated in the STARTALK institute to add Arabic to his language skills. "The class exceeded what I expected," he said. "The method of instruction was effective since it was fairly easy to grasp - and frequent repetition helps."

In summer 2009, Khan wants to continue his Arabic studies in Egypt, perhaps through another scholarship from the National Security Language Initiative. Torrez and Walker also see studying abroad in the Middle East as a goal.

CREATING INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMS

To include all students in their classrooms, language faculty must address disability issues.

"As long as instruction is individualized and tailored to fit different learning styles and needs, everyone can experience success," Hotard said. "Every student needs accommodations as well as an individualized learning plan."

STARTALK participants in Baton Rouge reinforced their reading, speaking, writing and listening comprehension skills with individualized instructional programs though the Cairo, Egypt-based Arab Academy Web site. This is useful for students who require extra help or who are advancing quickly in their language acquisition.

"The interesting aspect about my experience this summer was that the students with disabilities did not expect special privileges," Hotard said.

"They were held to high standards and performed as well [as], and in some cases better than, the ones without disabilities. All students in my class had a special talent and gift to share with the others," she said.

The National Security Language Initiative, announced early in 2006 by President Bush, is an effort by government agencies to increase the number of Americans learning Russian, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Arabic and languages in the Iranian/Indic/Turkic families.

More information on the National Security Language Initiative ( http://exchanges.state.gov/youth/programs/nsli.html ) is available on the State Department Web site.

Also see the Web sites of STARTALK ( http://startalk.umd.edu/ ), Mobility International USA ( http://www.miusa.org/ ) and the National Clearinghouse on Disability and Exchange ( http://www.miusa.org/ncde ).

See also "U.S. Students Increasingly Choosing To Learn Foreign Languages ( http://www.america.gov/st/washfile-english/2006/November/20061108160523berehellek0.3019525.html )" and "A Personal Experience in International Relations ( http://www.america.gov/st/educ-english/2008/April/20080522173839SrenoD0.458523.html )," and the "Disability and Ability ( http://www.america.gov/publications/ejournalusa/1106.html )" issue of eJournal USA.

Michele Scheib is a project specialist with the National Clearinghouse on Disability and Exchange. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of State and administered by Mobility International USA, the National Clearinghouse on Disability and Exchange works to increase the participation of people with disabilities in international educational and cultural programs.


Evidence of success 3

Evidence of Success 3

Article 3: U.S. Students Learn Arabic through STARTALK Program

Inclusive classroom serves students with and without disabilities

Link: http://www.america.gov/st/educ-english/2008/October/20081017163514xlrenneF2.758425e-02.html

20 October 2008

Source: U.S. Department of StateTop of Form

Bottom of Form

By Michele ScheibSpecial Correspondent

Washington — Inspired by world events, literature and places they would like to explore, more students in the United States are studying less traditional languages.

Elementary and secondary school students are taking classes funded through the National Security Language Initiative (NSLI), which is designed to dramatically increase the number of Americans learning critical-need foreign languages.  (See “President Introduces Foreign Language Initiative.”)

For the past two years NSLI also has funded the STARTALK Summer Institutes to make instruction in Arabic, Chinese, Hindi, Persian and Urdu more available nationally for secondary school students.  The program also provides additional training for teachers of these critical languages. By 2011, STARTALK will offer summer language classes to all grade levels (kindergarten through college) in every state and will include additional languages such as Russian and Korean.

In the summer of 2008, one STARTALK institute at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge brought together students with and without disabilities to learn Arabic and to explore Arabic culture through multimedia presentations, field trips and lectures guided by scholars from the United States and abroad.

The students in the Baton Rouge institute — one of 81 STARTALK projects for 2008 — each received a scholarship for books, supplies and room and board, as well as a small stipend and use of all facilities at Louisiana State University.

Najoua Hotard, Arabic adjunct professor at Loyola and Tulane universities in New Orleans, selected the 25 students, including five who had disabilities, to participate in the Baton Rouge program.

“I am very proud that STARTALK allows us to reach all students,” Hotard said. “Every educational system needs to learn about the benefits and richness of a classroom characterized by diversity.”

A DESIRE TO LEARN NEW LANGUAGES

Almost 60 percent of middle and high school students in the United States are “somewhat willing” to “very willing” to learn Arabic or other foreign languages not commonly studied in the U.S. schools, according to the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages.

Another study found that among first-year college students with disabilities, 24 percent have already completed a foreign language course by their spring semester and another 38 percent plan to take a foreign language. By their senior year, half of college students with disabilities have completed a foreign language course, according to unpublished results from the 2006 National Survey on Student Engagement, conducted among first-year and senior-year students at U.S. post-secondary institutions.

One of the students taking part in the five-week STARTALK Arabic program in Baton Rouge was Monica Torrez, who attends Riverside Community College in California.  “The Arabic alphabet and learning how to connect the written letters together was the easiest for me,” said Torrez, who also knows Spanish. “The most difficult was to conjugate the verbs and learn the sounds that the letters make.”

Torrez, a special education major, served as a one-on-one assistant to Jemila, a high school student with autism taking the course.

Zahra Al-Attar helps first-grader Anna Vilovchik write her name in Arabic at Mid-Prairie Elementary School in Kolona, Iowa.

“If Jemila was stuck, she came to me for help. She sometimes got stressed if she didn’t understand what was going on in class,” said Torrez, who added that Jemila’s Arabic language skills improved in the program. “When I asked her about the class, she said she loved it and wanted to continue learning Arabic.”

Everett Walker, an 18-year-old with diabetes and a mobility disability who also studied at the Baton Rouge institute, hopes to use his Arabic to serve his country by working for the U.S. government. “In class, we gained more and more knowledge. It’s not just about speaking, but also about the culture as a whole,” Walker said.

Shoeb Khan, a computer science major who uses a power wheelchair and already speaks Hindi and English, participated in the STARTALK institute to add Arabic to his language skills. “The class exceeded what I expected,” he said.  “The method of instruction was effective since it was fairly easy to grasp — and frequent repetition helps.”

In summer 2009, Khan wants to continue his Arabic studies in Egypt, perhaps through another scholarship from the National Security Language Initiative. Torrez and Walker also see studying abroad in the Middle East as a goal.

CREATING INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMS

To include all students in their classrooms, language faculty must address disability issues.

“As long as instruction is individualized and tailored to fit different learning styles and needs, everyone can experience success,” Hotard said. “Every student needs accommodations as well as an individualized learning plan.” 

STARTALK participants in Baton Rouge reinforced their reading, speaking, writing and listening comprehension skills with individualized instructional programs though the Cairo, Egypt-based Arab Academy Web site. This is useful for students who require extra help or who are advancing quickly in their language acquisition.

“The interesting aspect about my experience this summer was that the students with disabilities did not expect special privileges,” Hotard said.

“They were held to high standards and performed as well [as], and in some cases better than, the ones without disabilities. All students in my class had a special talent and gift to share with the others,” she said.

The National Security Language Initiative, announced early in 2006 by President Bush, is an effort by government agencies to increase the number of Americans learning Russian, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Arabic and languages in the Iranian/Indic/Turkic families.

More information on the National Security Language Initiative is available on the State Department Web site.

Also see the Web sites of STARTALK, Mobility International USA and the National Clearinghouse on Disability and Exchange.  

See also “U.S. Students Increasingly Choosing To Learn Foreign Languages” and “A Personal Experience in International Relations,” and the “Disability and Ability” issue of eJournal USA.

Michele Scheib is a project specialist with the National Clearinghouse on Disability and Exchange. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of State and administered by Mobility International USA, the National Clearinghouse on Disability and Exchange works to increase the participation of people with disabilities in international educational and cultural programs.


Evidence of success 4

Evidence of Success 4

Article 4: More US students learning Arabic

Link: http://www.gulf-times.com/site/topics/article.asp?cu_no=2&item_no=253017&version=1&template_id=46&parent_id=26

Daily Newspaper published by Gulf Publishing & Printing Co. Doha, Qatar

Latest Update: Friday7/11/2008November, 2008, 11:59 PM Doha Time

http://www.gulf-times.com/site/topics/article.asp?cu_no=2&item_no=253017&version=1&template_id=46&parent_id=26

WASHINGTON: Inspired by world events, literature and places they would like to explore, more students in the US are studying less traditional languages. The STARTALK Summer Institutes, a project of the federally funded National Security Language Initiative, makes instruction in Arabic, Chinese, Hindi, Persian and Urdu more available nationally for students at all grade levels. One STARTALK institute at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge brought together students with and without disabilities to work together to learn Arabic and to explore Arabic culture through multimedia presentations, field trips and lectures guided by scholars from the US and abroad.The students in the Baton Rouge institute — one of 81 STARTALK projects for 2008 — each received a scholarship for books, supplies and room and board, as well as a small stipend and use of all facilities at Louisiana State University. Najoua Hotard, Arabic adjunct professor at Loyola and Tulane universities in New Orleans, selected the 25 students, including five who had disabilities, to participate in the Baton Rouge program.Almost 60% of middle and high school students in the US are ‘somewhat willing’ to ‘very willing’ to learn Arabic or other foreign languages not commonly studied in the US schools, according to the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages. Another study found that among first-year college students with disabilities, 24% have already completed a foreign language course by their spring semester and another 38% plan to take a foreign language. By their senior year, half of college students with disabilities have completed a foreign language course, according to results from the 2006 National Survey on Student Engagement, conducted among first-year and senior-year students at US post-secondary institutions. One of the students taking part in the five-week STARTALK Arabic programe in Baton Rouge was Monica Torrez, who attends Riverside Community College in California. “The Arabic alphabet and learning how to connect the written letters together was the easiest for me,” said Torrez. “The most difficult was to conjugate the verbs and learn the sounds that the letters make.”Everett Walker, an 18-year-old with diabetes and a mobility disability who also studied at the Baton Rouge institute, hopes to use his Arabic to serve his country by doing intelligence work for the US government. “In class, we gained more and more knowledge. It’s not just about speaking, but also about the culture as a whole,” Walker said. Shoeb Khan, a computer science major who uses a power wheelchair and already speaks Hindi and English, participated in the STARTALK institute to add Arabic to his language skills. “The class exceeded what I expected,” he said. “The method of instruction was effective since it was fairly easy to grasp — and frequent repetition helps.”In summer 2009, Khan wants to continue his Arabic studies in Egypt, perhaps through another scholarship from the National Security Language Initiative. Torrez and Walker also see studying abroad in the Middle East as a goal. STARTALK participants in Baton Rouge reinforced their reading, speaking, writing and listening comprehension skills with individualized instructional programs though the Cairo, Egypt-based Arab Academy website. This is useful for students who require extra help or who are advancing quickly in their language acquisition. The National Security Language Initiative, announced in 2006 by President George Bush, is an effort by government agencies to increase the number of Americans learning Russian, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Arabic and languages in the Iranian/Indic/Turkic families. – America.gov


Conclusions

Conclusions

  • In our outreach endeavors, remember that each outreach campaign is different and your strategic plan is dictated by your environment what works for ICLCE might not be suitable for you.

  • Let’s not re-invent the wheel. These are not my original ideas I learned them from other organizational outreach strategies. JUST THINK HOW MANY PEOPLE KNOCKED AT YOUR DOOR OR PUT A FLIER ON YOUR WINDSHIELD. We can learn from other’s outreach campaigns and from other organizations

  • Do not fear rejection

  • The community will welcome you

  • Other summer programs will not think you are stealing their students. You are recruiting a different population

  • You will be given tips how to approach others for help

  • You will receive referrals from the community,


Audience contributions and brainstorming

Audience Contributions and Brainstorming

  • Parents (the best advocate for the STARTALK program)

  • Fundraisers

  • Advertisement (free local newspapers and magazines)

  • PTA groups

  • Home-schooled youth

  • School board bulletin boards

  • World language coordinators at the State Department

  • Summer Camps

  • Museums

  • 4H Clubs

  • Malls

  • Small business owners

  • State fairs.

  • Exchange adds on cooperating websites.

  • Non-profit institutions

  • Ethnic Dance Clubs

  • Nature or science based institutions such as zoos

  • Cooking clubs

  • World/Global councils

  • Service organization


Startalk fosters global citizenship and community by making connections

STARTALK fosters global citizenship and community by making connections

Our children are worth it, our global community is worth it, humanity is worth it.

STARTALK is the gift that keeps on giving!


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