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Know Your Heart Online Workshop. Stop Smoking: Clear the Air. When Smokers Quit Health Benefits Start. 20 Minutes Blood pressure drops to normal. Pulse rate drops to normal. Temperature of hands and feet increase to normal. 1 Year Risk of coronary heart disease is half that of a smoker.

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Know Your Heart Online Workshop

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Know your heart online workshop

Know Your Heart Online Workshop

Stop Smoking: Clear the Air


Know your heart online workshop

When Smokers Quit Health Benefits Start

20 Minutes

Blood pressure drops to normal. Pulse rate drops to normal. Temperature of hands and feet increase to normal.

1 Year

Risk of coronary heart disease is half that of a smoker.

8 Hours

Carbon monoxide level in blood drops to normal. Oxygen level in blood increases to normal.

1-9 Months

Coughing, sinus congestion, fatigue, shortness of breath decrease, Cilia re-grow in lungs, increasing ability to handle mucus, clean the lungs, reduce infection.

24 Hours

Chance of heart attack decreases.

48 Hours

Nerve endings start re-growing. Ability to smell and taste is enhanced. Walking becomes easier.

2 Weeks to 3 Months

Circulation improves. Lung function increases up to 30%.


Know your heart online workshop

Health Reasons to Stop Smoking

  • Reduce your risk of dying from smoking related illness.

  • Smokersare at higher risk of having:

    • Heart problems

    • Developing many types of cancers

    • Respiratory tract infections (colds/chronic bronchitis)

    • Ulcers, cataracts and osteoporosis

    • Medical problems or dying after surgery.

  • Smokers have higher medical costs over their lifetime.


Know your heart online workshop

Other Reasons to Stop Smoking

  • Tobacco smoke smells bad and makes the smoker’s body, hair, clothes and the places they smoke (home/car) smell unpleasant.

  • Smoking increases facial wrinkles.

  • The tar in cigarettes and pipes stains hands, clothing, walls and car interiors.

  • Using tobacco products can be expensive.

  • Laws prohibit smoking in public places andcontinues to become less socially acceptable.

  • Ash from cigarettes and pipes are messy and chewing tobacco spit is gross/unpleasant.


Smoking affects pregnancy and childbirth

Smoking Affects Pregnancy and Childbirth

  • A woman may experience difficulties conceiving if she or her partner smoke.

  • Smoking during pregnancy increases the risk of serious health problems for mother and unborn baby.

    • High blood pressure

    • Premature delivery

    • Low birth weight baby

    • Potential infant death, increase risk of SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome)

  • Nicotine can be passed to baby while in womb and through breast milk.


Does smoking harm the non smoker

Does Smoking Harm the Non-Smoker?

  • Secondhand smoke, the smoke exhaled by the smoker or coming from the end of a lit cigarette, can cause smoking related illness in non-smokers.

    • Various cancers

    • Heart disease

  • Secondhand smoke may also cause an increased risk of heart disease or cancer in the non-smoker.

  • Children and adults see an increase risk of pneumonia, asthma and bronchitis. Children have an even higher risk.

  • Parents who smoke are more likely to have children who grow up to be smokers.


Specialty cigarettes and cigarette like products

Specialty Cigarettes and “Cigarette-Like" Products

  • These products carry similar health risks as regular cigarettes but are often marketed as “Healthy options”

    • "Low-yield", "light", "ultra-light“ and "cigarette-like" products, called PREPs (Potentially Reduced Exposure Products).

    • Bidis are thin, hand-rolled imported cigarettes, and may be chocolate or fruit-flavored.

    • Kreteks (also called clove cigarettes) are imported and contain nicotine, plus other additives.


Pipes and cigars

Pipes and Cigars

  • Large cigars, cigarillos and little cigars have the same chemicals found in cigarettes and are harmful to your health.

  • Pipes or cigar smokers have increased risk of lung, esophagus, larynx and oral cavity cancers because of how pipes and cigars are inhaled/smoked.


Smokeless tobacco

Smokeless Tobacco

  • Chewing tobacco and snuff are types of smokeless tobacco. The products are chewed, sucked and then spit out or sniffed through the nose.

    • Nicotine is absorbed through the cheek, gums, under the tongue or through the nasal passageway.

  • Smokeless tobacco contains the same harmful chemicals as cigarettes.

    • Users have an increased risk of mouth sores and gum disease.

  • Smokeless tobacco products are highly addictive.

  • Smokeless tobacco users are more likely to become cigarette smokers.


Ways to stop smoking

Ways to Stop Smoking

  • There is no “right” way to stop smoking. Finding the method that works best for the smokers personality and lifestyle will help ensure success.

    • Cold Turkey

      • Quit smoking without the aid of nicotine replacement products or prescription drugs.

    • Join a smoking cessation class or online program

      • Freedom from Smoking or Stop Smoking: Clear the Air workshop.

      • www.lungusa.org/stop-smoking/

    • Nicotine Replacement Therapies

    • Prescription Medications


Nicotine r eplacement therapies nrt

Nicotine Replacement Therapies (NRT)

  • General information about NRT’s

    • Various forms: gum, skin patches and lozenges are over-the-counter drugs. Nose sprays and inhalers require a physician prescription.

    • Help relieve nicotine withdrawal symptoms by supplying nicotine to the body.

    • No harmful gases or tar that cause disease.

    • Talk to your doctor if you are pregnant or taking other medications before using NRT’s.

    • After selecting an NRT, read and follow the directions for its use, and information about potential side effects.


Prescription medications

Prescription Medications

  • Prescription Medications require a physician prescription. Some commonly prescribed drugs are listed alphabetically below:

    • Chantix (varenicline) is a pill that blocks pleasure receptors receptors in the brain, making smoking less enjoyable.

    • Nicotrol NS (nicotine nasal spray) NRT.

    • Zyban (bupropion) anti-depressant that reduces the urge to smoke.

    • Make an appointment with a healthcare provider if interested in using prescription medication to help quit smoking.


Some first s teps to stop using nicotine

Some First Steps to Stop Using Nicotine

  • Spend time making a plan for how you are going to quit.

    • Be detail orientated and look for ways to mix up your daily routine to help break the habit. What things trigger your urge to smoke?

    • Include fitness and look for activities you can do to keep you away from smoking.

    • Track your smoking habit before you quit, try to reduce the amount you smoke prior to quit day.

    • Spring clean areas you smoke (detail your car) get your teeth whitened.

  • Pick a date to quit and mark it on a calendar.

    • Tell your friends/family/co-workers you are the date you are planning to quit. Accept whatever support they offer.

  • If you smoke after quit day, do not give up. Look at your plan again and make adjustments. Pick a new quit day and start over.


  • Nicotine withdrawal

    Nicotine Withdrawal

    • Nicotine withdrawal symptoms may begin several hours after decreasing the amount of nicotine and can last about 3-7 days. Drinking plenty of water and use of NRT’s or prescriptions help to alleviate these symptoms.

      • Hand tremors (shaking)

      • Insomnia or trouble staying asleep

      • Nausea

      • Restlessness or anxiety

      • Sweating or fast heartbeat


    Coping with cravings

    Coping With Cravings

    • Cravings or urges to smoke are normal after stopping smoking.

    • The "Four D's" can help you manage cravings:

      • Delay. Do your best not to act on the urge to smoke. The urge will pass in a few minutes.

      • Deep breathing. Breathe in slowly and deeply, then breathe out slowly. Relax and forget the urge to smoke.

      • Drink water. Drink water slowly and often.

      • Distract. Take your mind off smoking by trying a different activity. Get up and move around, even leave the location you are at.


    Avoid g oing b ack to using nicotine

    Avoid Going Back to Using Nicotine

    • Avoid activities that trigger the urge to smoke.

    • Keep and review a list why YOU want to be a non-smoker.

    • If the urge to smoke comes, seek support from friends and family. Use strategies that helped you quit (NRT’s, etc).

    • Keep busy.

    • Keep cigarette substitutes, such as carrot sticks, small straws, sugarless gum/candy.

    • Save the money that you would have spent on nicotine products. Spend the money of a gift for yourself.


    Do not give up

    Do Not Give Up

    • If you do smoke a cigarette or use a nicotine product, do not give up. Stop and think of how many hours, days, or weeks you have already managed to get through.

      • Identify what caused you to smoke, and add it to your list of things to avoid. If you cannot avoid the trigger, practice how you will deal with it next time.

      • Review all of the health risks that come with using nicotine, to both yourself and others.

      • Review all of the reasons why you stopped using nicotine.


    Manage s tress w ithout u sing nicotine

    Manage Stress Without Using Nicotine

    • Watch or attend the Stress Management for Heart Health workshop.

    • Listen to music, go for a walk, take a bath, call a friend, or go to a quiet place by yourself for a few minutes.

    • Think positive, focus on how successful you have been in stopping smoking.

    • Try the "Three R's“:

      • Remind yourself why you quit smoking. Look at your list of reasons for quitting.

      • Rehearse or practice what to do if the urge to smoke comes.

      • Reward yourself when you beat the urge to smoke. Praise yourself for your willpower and courage.


    Weight management

    Weight Management

    • Not every one gains weight when they stop smoking. However, the average weight gain is 5-7 pounds. The following are some ways you can avoid weight gain:

      • Brush your teeth or use mouthwash often.

      • Drink water before meals. Drink water and liquids during and between meals.

      • Eat healthy, well-balanced meals. Visit www.myptyramid.gov for healthy calorie amounts and foods.

      • Get up from the table as soon as you finish your meal.

      • If you get hungry between meals eat sugarless and low-calorie snacks.

      • Take a walk or do some kind of exercise every day.

    • Listen to music, go for a walk, take a bath, call a friend, or go to a quiet place by yourself for a few minutes.

    • Think positive, focus on how successful you have been in stopping smoking

    • Try the "Three R's“:

      • Remind yourself why you quit smoking. Look at your list of reasons for quitting.

      • Rehearse or practice what to do if the urge to smoke comes.

      • Reward yourself when you beat the urge to smoke. Praise yourself for your willpower and courage.


    Additional resources

    AdditionalResources

    • Delnor Hospital Stop Smoking: Clear the Air workshop

    • Phone: 630-208-3999 Web Address: www.delnor.com

      • Smokefree.gov

  • Phone: 1-800-784-8669Web Address: www.smokefree.gov

  • American Cancer SocietyPhone: 1-800-227-2345Web Address: http://www.cancer.org


  • Additional resources continued

    AdditionalResources - Continued

    American Heart Association National Center7272 Greenville AvenueDallas, TX75231-4596 Phone: 1-800-242-8721Web Address: http://www.americanheart.org

    American Lung Association1301 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Suite 800Washington, DC, NY 20004Phone: 1-1-212-315-8700Phone: 1-1-800--548-8252Web Address: http://www.lungusa.org


    Know your heart online workshop1

    Know Your Heart Online Workshop

    • Thank you for participating in this online workshop!

    • Visit www.delnor.com to learn about our other programs, including our free Know Your Heart Risk Assessments and Workshops.

    • Questions? Call us at 630-208-3999


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