Ch 1 the profession of transp engineering
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Ch 1. The Profession of Transp. Engineering. Lecture Objectives:. Know that transportation is a derived demand Understand that the quality of transportation services will affect the economic growth Be able to identify some of the social benefits and costs of transportation

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Ch 1. The Profession of Transp. Engineering

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Ch 1 the profession of transp engineering

Ch 1. The Profession of Transp. Engineering

Lecture Objectives:

  • Know that transportation is a derived demand

  • Understand that the quality of transportation services will affect the economic growth

  • Be able to identify some of the social benefits and costs of transportation

  • Understand that balanced intermodal transportation systems are necessary to reduce social costs

  • Understand that public policies affect the direction of transportation development


Transportation and economic growth

Transportation and Economic Growth

  • Couple of statements in page 4 help you understand why providing excellent transportation services are essential for a country.

  • Good transportation, in and of itself, will not assure success in the market place; however, the absence of excellent transportation services will contribute to failure.

  • Transportation is a necessary condition for human interaction and economic survival.

  • Transportation is a necessary element of government services such as delivering mail, defending a nation, and retaining control of its territories.

  • Transportation systems are developed and built to ensure easy mobilization of armies in the event of a national emergency.


Producers transportation networks consumers essential links

Producers – Transportation Networks – Consumers(Essential links)

LA

Osamu Corp.

NYC

Daikich Sushi

Tuna - the Philippines

Salmon – Chile

Shrimp - Indonesia

Based on an article in the Daily Herald, 8/21/00


Social costs and benefits need for a balanced intermodal system

Social Costs and Benefits  Need for a Balanced Intermodal System

Breakdown of livable communities

Services to rural areas

Environmental Disruption (Air, water, noise)

Expanded mobility

Freeway as an example

Expanded economic activities

Divided communities

Loss of lives

Faster delivery of goods and services

Loss of lands

Congestion and delay

Loss of the natural beauty

UDOT, I-15/I-215 Interchange


Transportation in the u s the major contributor to its gnp

Transportation in the U.S.The major contributor to its GNP

Transport Bill as % of the GNP

See page 5 of the text for recent values

Source: Transportation in America, 1993, Eno Foundation


Highway travel consumes a lot of petroleum

Highway travel consumes a lot of petroleum

Fuel, oil, asphalt

1993: Total=6.23 billion barrels

Source: Transportation in America, 1993, Eno Foundation


Other facts

Other Facts

  • Over 80% of eligible drivers have driver’s licenses (185 millions in 1998). About 208 million registered vehicles. Population  About 270 millions. (This is probably one reason why so much money is pumped into highways. But is it alright to ignore 20% of the people who are eligible but not able to have licenses? Remember they do pay taxes. Gasoline taxes are used basically for construction of new roads. They are not enough for maintaining/operating highways. They come from other general taxes.)

  • Travels an average of 12,000 miles/year

  • Transportation industries employ over 11% of work force 14.3 million people in transportation industries in 1998 (11.1% of total employment)


Why automobile travel surged

Why automobile travel surged?

  • Public policies favored automobile travel

  • Successful lobbying by special interests

  • Large public investments (subsidies) in highway travel and a miniscule amount of public investments in public transit

  • Unrealistically low out-of-pocket costs (Drivers do not think of the true cost of driving a car.)


Are drivers really paying enough

Are drivers really paying enough?

UD = User direct costs

UF = User fixed costs

SS = Subsidies

SC = Social costs

EC = Environmental costs

Vuchic, “Transportation for Livable Cities,” p.236


Recent trend

Recent Trend

  • Management of the existing facilities

  • Less new constructions of highways

  • Reinvestment in public transit (TRAX for instance)

  • Intermodalism

  • Reduction of vehicle kilometers (miles) of travel – VKT or VMT – and delays due to congestion

  • Intelligent Transportation Systems

  • Coordination of land use and transportation network


Example of intermodalism in our community in the near future

Example of intermodalism in our community (in the near future…)


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