Learning ArcGIS

Learning ArcGIS PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Setting up your project. What format

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Learning ArcGIS

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1. Learning ArcGIS

2. Setting up your project What format – files, geodatabase Naming conventions Data Dictionary Projection – spatial reference Scale metadata

3. Data Used to be the Most Costly (time and money) part of a GIS Internet has made a difference Many sites Many formats Many things to consider

4. Data Management

5. Simple Projects using file folders

6. Object Model

7. Geodatabase Model

8. Spatial Reference Defines feature class coordinates Required for stand-alone feature classes and feature datasets Consists of: The spatial reference The spatial reference is a collection of properties that define the coordinates used to store feature class shapes. It is required for stand-alone feature classes and for feature datasets. Geographic coordinate system (GCS) The GCS documents the shape of the earth: the spheroid (NAD27, HPGN, etc.), the lengths of the axis of the spheroid, and so forth. You should set the GCS if you store your data in latitude and longitude. ArcGIS supports about 350 GCSs, each of which is optimized for a specific location on the earth (Africa, North America, etc.). Projected coordinate system (PCS) The PCS documents how the 3D positions on the earth’s surface are translated into 2D positions on a map. A PCS defines the projection (Lambert, UTM, etc.), the coordinate units, and other parameters. It also includes a GCS; for example, an Albers projection for the United States may be based on NAD27 or NAD83. ArcGIS supports about 1,700 PCSs. Coordinate domains – very important The precision and extent properties of the coordinate domains are used to scale and shift your data’s coordinates for storage as integers in the features Shape field. As such, these are very important settings and you must determine them before you create any feature classes or feature datasets for a new geodatabase. The following slides show you how. Changing the spatial reference The GCS and PCS document your data and may be changed. For example, if you set the wrong PCS when you define a feature dataset, you may change it in ArcCatalog (this will NOT re-project the data, just change the description). However, the coordinate domains control the actual storage of the coordinates and cannot be changed; if you get it wrong, you must create a new feature class and transfer the old data into it.The spatial reference The spatial reference is a collection of properties that define the coordinates used to store feature class shapes. It is required for stand-alone feature classes and for feature datasets. Geographic coordinate system (GCS) The GCS documents the shape of the earth: the spheroid (NAD27, HPGN, etc.), the lengths of the axis of the spheroid, and so forth. You should set the GCS if you store your data in latitude and longitude. ArcGIS supports about 350 GCSs, each of which is optimized for a specific location on the earth (Africa, North America, etc.). Projected coordinate system (PCS) The PCS documents how the 3D positions on the earth’s surface are translated into 2D positions on a map. A PCS defines the projection (Lambert, UTM, etc.), the coordinate units, and other parameters. It also includes a GCS; for example, an Albers projection for the United States may be based on NAD27 or NAD83. ArcGIS supports about 1,700 PCSs. Coordinate domains – very important The precision and extent properties of the coordinate domains are used to scale and shift your data’s coordinates for storage as integers in the features Shape field. As such, these are very important settings and you must determine them before you create any feature classes or feature datasets for a new geodatabase. The following slides show you how. Changing the spatial reference The GCS and PCS document your data and may be changed. For example, if you set the wrong PCS when you define a feature dataset, you may change it in ArcCatalog (this will NOT re-project the data, just change the description). However, the coordinate domains control the actual storage of the coordinates and cannot be changed; if you get it wrong, you must create a new feature class and transfer the old data into it.

9. GIS Data http://seamless.usgs.gov/

10. Seamless Tutorial - http://seamless.usgs.gov/tutorial.asp

11. Some States have good GIS Data – not all do

12. Geography Network http://www.geographynetwork.com

13. Shaded Relief – ArcIMS http://www.esri.com/data/download/usgs_ned/access.html

14. Google it! NOOA NASA EPA National Hydrology Dataset National Atlas National Map American Fact Finder

15. Learning ArcGIS ESRI Press Books Basic – GIS Tutorial, Getting to Know ArcGIS ESRI Training and Education Instructor Lead, Virtual Campus Course, Seminars

16. ArcUser magazine – online, including tutorials www.esri.com/arcuser

17. Tutorials available through ArcGIS Help Online from software help Data and exercises

18. ArcGIS 9.2 Desktop Help online

19. ArcGIS Online for ArcGIS and ArcGIS Explorer http://arcgisonline.esri.com/

20. ArcGIS Explorer http://resources.esri.com/arcgisexplorer/

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