Wjec 2012 unseen poetry
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WJEC 2012 Unseen poetry. Wednesday, 07 December 2011. FORMAT OF QUESTION. Always “modern” Always comparative. Always thematically linked. Bullet points assist in structuring response. Spend about 1 hr on the question. Required to have a personal response.

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WJEC 2012 Unseen poetry

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Wjec 2012 unseen poetry

WJEC 2012 Unseen poetry

Wednesday, 07 December 2011


Format of question

FORMAT OF QUESTION

  • Always “modern”

  • Always comparative.

  • Always thematically linked.

  • Bullet points assist in structuring response.

  • Spend about 1 hr on the question.

  • Required to have a personal response.

  • Not required to play “i-spy devices” but to engage with the language and its effects.


Sample paper

Sample paper

  • WJEC samplepapers lit 2012.pdf

  • C:\Users\jwp\Desktop\poems yr 11.docx


Approach

APPROACH

  • Read the question and underline any key points.

  • The bullets are always the same – get used to them. C,I,M, L, E.

  • Reading 1 – annotate simply – look for powerful language or unusual effects using structure, punctuation or language.

  • Reading 2 – Find the VOICE and SITUATION. Who is speaking and des the situation produce a recognisable tone – angry, sad, scared…


Now you can develop further

Now you can develop further.

  • Language is used to create images.

  • Simple imagery (literal imagery) tells the reader “as it is”. It can be very direct and effective.

  • More complex or “figurative” imagery uses metaphor or simile, for example and presents more challenging images that require the reader to respond to suggestion.

  • It is vital that you comment on the effect of language choice rather than offer bland platitudes of the “makes the reader think” variety.


Now for the comparison

Now for the comparison

  • Look at the second poem and repeat the idea.

  • Try to focus on the same areas that you discussed or investigated in poem 1, that way you will produce a “real” comparison using good comparative connectors – on the other hand, similarly…

  • There is no obligation to make comparison in each paragraph rather than to write about the poems separately, but it is a more sophisticated approach.


And finally

And finally -

  • Respond – what do you feel?

  • Your conclusion should address bullet five and link your previous comments to some form of personal response to the two poems.

  • Look at the two poems that follow and annotate them in preparation for an essay.


Woman work

Woman Work

I’ve got the children to tend

The clothes to mend

The floor to mop

The food to shop

Then the chicken to fry

The baby to dry

I got company to feed

The garden to weed

I’ve got the shirts to press

The tots to dress

The cane to be cut

I gotta clean up this hut

Then see about the sick

And the cotton to pick.

Shine on me, sunshine

Rain on me, rain

Fall softly, dewdrops

And cool my brow again.

Storm, blow me from here

With your fiercest wind

Let me float across the sky

‘Til I can rest again

Fall gently, snowflakes

Cover me with white

Cold icy kisses and

Let me rest tonight.

Sun, rain, curving sky

Mountain, oceans, leaf and stone

Star shine, moon glow

You’re all that I can call my own.

Maya Angelou


Overheard in county sligo

Overheard in County Sligo

I married a man from County Roscommon

and I live in the back of beyond

with a field of cows and a yard of hens

and six white geese on the pond.

At my door’s a square of yellow corn

caught up by its corners and shaken,

and the road runs down through the open gate

and freedom’s there for the taking.

I had thought to work on the Abbey* stage

or have my name in a book,

to see my thought on the printed page,

or still the crowd with a look.

But I turn to fold the breakfast cloth

and to polish the lustre and brass,

to order and dust the tumbled rooms

and find my face in the glass.

I ought to feel I’m a happy woman

for I lie in the lap of the land,

and I married a man from County Roscommon

and I live in the back of beyond.

Gillian Clarke

* Abbey: A well-known theatre in Dublin


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