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LITERARY DEVICES ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN. BILDUNGSROMAN. A novel which chronicles the physical, emotional, and psychological development of a young protagonist through to adulthood Examples: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn , Twain (debatable) David Copperfield, Charles Dickens

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Literary devices adventures of huckleberry finn

LITERARY DEVICESADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN


Bildungsroman
BILDUNGSROMAN

  • A novel which chronicles the physical, emotional, and psychological development of a young protagonist through to adulthood

  • Examples:

    • Adventures of Huckleberry

      Finn, Twain (debatable)

    • David Copperfield,

      Charles Dickens

    • The Kite Runner, Hosseini

    • A Tree Grows in Brooklyn,

      Smith


Colloquialism
COLLOQUIALISM

  • A conversational expression or spoken, informal level of speech

  • Example from modern-day language:

    • "I think country gets dumped on across the board by the Grammys."(Toby Keith)

    • She was recently dumped by her fiance.

  • Example from Huck Finn:

    • “You don’t know about me without you have read a book by the name of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, but that ain’t no matter.”


Dialect
DIALECT

  • The particular variety of language spoken in a definite place by a distinct group of people

    • Dialects vary in pronunciation, vocabulary, use of colloquialisms, and sentence structure

    • Dialects are used to establish setting and provide local color

    • Examples:

      • South: "Y'all"North: "You guys"South: "Fixin' to"North: "About to"South: "Howdy"North: "Hey"South: "Twixt"North: "Between“

        http://robertspage.com/dialects.html]


Episodic
EPISODIC

  • Narrative fiction which is structured around a series of loosely linked vignettes, each of which contains a conflict, climax, and conclusion


Irony
IRONY

  • A contrast or tension between what is expected and what occurs

    • Situational Irony – When a character or reader expects one thing to happen, but the opposite occurs

    • Verbal Irony – When a character means the opposite of what is said (i.e. sarcasm)

      • ML: Kids, we have a pop quiz today!

      • KIDS: Oh, great.

    • Dramatic Irony – When there is a

      contrast between what a character

      knows and what a reader knows


Local color
LOCAL COLOR

  • The use of characters and details unique to a particular geographic area.

    • Created by the use of customs, clothing, manners, attitudes, scenery, or landscape

    • Local color stories were extremely popular after the Civil War

      • Examples: Mark Twain – Mississippi River, Bret Harte – The Wild West


MOOD

  • Atmosphere; the feeling created in the reader by a literary work

    • Not to be confused with tone, which reflects the feelings of the writer

    • CREEPY: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fBGGAjMg9vw


Na ve narrator
NAÏVE NARRATOR

  • A first-person narrator who, though not always, is often young and possesses traits of innocence, openness, candor, and a lack of sophistication


Picaresque
PICARESQUE

  • A satirical, episodic novel that presents the life story of:

    • A triumphant rascal

    • Of low social status

    • Making a living through his wits


Point of view
POINT OF VIEW

  • The perspective or vantage point from which a story is told:

    • First Person: I saw her from across the hallway and my heart stopped. I liked that girl.

    • Second Person: You saw her from across the hallway and your heart stopped. You liked that girl.

    • Third Person Limited: He saw her from across the hallway and his heart stopped. He liked that girl. She smiled at him. What could that beautiful smile mean? Did she like him, too?

    • Third Person Omniscient: He saw her from across the hallway and his heart stopped. He liked that girl. She saw him and smiled. She liked him, too.


Realism
REALISM

  • An accurate and detailed portrayal of real life

  • The literary movement of Realism developed in the latter half of the 19th century

    • Based on careful observations about contemporary life

    • Usually portrays something unapologetically, “warts and all”

    • EMBRACES: Objectivity and honesty

    • REJECTS: Sentimentality and idealism

      of the previous Romantic movement

      http://player.discoveryeducation.com/index.cfm?guidAssetId=58DDD094-002B-4C17-A2AF-18E2595785B2&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US


Romanticism
ROMANTICISM

  • A literary and artistic movement of the first half of the nineteenth century which arose in reaction against eighteenth century Rationalism

  • Values

    • Imagination

    • Emotion over reason

    • Individuality

    • The exotic

    • Nature

  • American Romantics: Poe, Thoreau, Emerson, Dickinson, Hawthorne

  • http://player.discoveryeducation.com/index.cfm?guidAssetId=FFF65663-256C-40C3-961A-283E35A8BF5A&blnFromSearch=1&productcode=US


Satire
SATIRE

  • A literary technique in which ideas, customs, behaviors, or institutions are ridiculed for the purpose of improving society

  • Satire uses:

    • Irony

    • Sarcasm

    • Exaggeration

    • Caricature


TONE

  • The attitude a writer takes toward a subject. The language and details used help to create tone.

  • Examples:

    • Playful

    • Serious

    • Bitter

    • Angry

    • Detached


Literary devices in modern reality
Literary Devices in Modern Reality

  • http://www.nbc.com/saturday-night-live/video/the-californians/1396627/


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