BECOMING A LAWYER

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How do you become a lawyer?. Go to law schoolAny undergraduate degree is acceptableYou must take the LSAT to be accepted into most law schools.Most graduates get a Juris Doctorate (J.D.) degreeSome lawyers later get an LL.M. in order to specializeForeign lawyers get an LL.M. in American law to

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BECOMING A LAWYER

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1. BECOMING A LAWYER

2. How do you become a lawyer? Go to law school Any undergraduate degree is acceptable You must take the LSAT to be accepted into most law schools. Most graduates get a Juris Doctorate (J.D.) degree Some lawyers later get an LL.M. in order to specialize Foreign lawyers get an LL.M. in American law to be able to practice in this country http://prelaw.asu.edu/explore/faq Arizona State University answers frequently asked questions.

3. How do you become a lawyer? You must pass the bar exam in the state in which you practice. If you want to practice in another state and if you have been practicing for several years, some states allow you to practice without retaking the bar exam.

4. Where should you practice? Large Full-Service Firms Smaller Firms and Boutique Firms Government Legal Clinics and Advocacy Organizations Working in Industry (In-house) Clerking/Academia

5. Areas of Practice Administrative Law and Regulatory Practice Antitrust Law Business Law Criminal Justice Dispute Resolution Environment, Energy and Resources Family Law Government and Public Sector Lawyers Health Law Intellectual Property Law International Law

6. Areas of Practice Labor and Employment Law Litigation Public Contract Law Public Utility Transportation Law Real Property, Trust and Estate Law Science and Technology Law State and Local Government Law Taxation Tort Trial And Insurance Practice Section

7. What else can you do with a law degree? WHAT SKILLS HAVE YOU DEVELOPED? writing, editing, interviewing, organizing information, researching, and giving attention to detail legislative analysis and drafting, policy planning, or lobbying. persuasion, organization, and communication skills experience with client contact, counseling, and analytical thinking

8. What else can you do with a law degree? ACTORS WRITERS GOVERNMENTAL JOBS ACTIVISTS POLITICIANS PHILANTHROPISTS HUMANITARIANS MEDIA PERSONALITIES ENTREPRENEURS AND BUSINESSPEOPLE MEDIATORS OR OMBUDSPERSON

9. Pre-Law Handbook Visit http://www.prelawhandbook.com/home.

10. How is the job market? Baby boomers are starting to retire There is a recession Some practice areas have declined in recent years: Personal-injury and medical-malpractice cases have been undercut by state laws limiting class-action suits, out-of-state plaintiffs and payouts on damages. For all but top-tier graduates of elite law schools, it's been tough.

11. There has been a substantial increase in the number of law school graduates In the 2005-06 academic year, 43,883 Juris Doctor degrees were awarded, up from 37,909 for 2001-02, according to the American Bar Association. Universities are starting up more law schools in part for prestige but also because they are money makers. Costs are low compared with other graduate schools and classrooms can be large. Since 1995, the number of ABA-accredited schools increased by 11%, to 196.

12. Number of U.S. law degrees awarded, 1980-2006

13. Also consider, Adding to the burden for young lawyers: Tuition growth at law schools has almost tripled the rate of inflation over the past 20 years, leading to higher debt for students and making starting salaries for most graduates less manageable, especially in expensive cities. Graduates in 2006 of public and private law schools had borrowed an average of $54,509 and $83,181, up 17% and 18.6%, respectively, from the amount borrowed by 2002 graduates, according to the American Bar Association.

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