OPPOSITION TO VIETNAM WAR

OPPOSITION TO VIETNAM WAR PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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The Vietnam War raised important questions about the public's right to information versus other considerations such as protecting government secrets and maintaining a strong war effort1) A terrorist group that is holding an Australian hostage sends your news organization a video tape of the hostage

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OPPOSITION TO VIETNAM WAR

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1. OPPOSITION TO VIETNAM WAR

2. The Vietnam War raised important questions about the public’s right to information versus other considerations such as protecting government secrets and maintaining a strong war effort 1) A terrorist group that is holding an Australian hostage sends your news organization a video tape of the hostage denouncing Australian foreign policy. The accompanying note states that the hostage will be released if you air the tape on the evening news. Do you air it, refuse, or agree to follow whatever course the government advises? ROLE OF MEDIA

3. 2) One of your reporters has been given secret government documents that show the government has tortured foreigners arrested for involvement in terrorist plots against Australians. Do you tell the public? 3) A wanted terrorist grants one of your reporters an exclusive, face-to-face interview, but on the condition that you do not reveal his hiding place to the government. Do you refuse the interview, agree to the terms and abide by them or agree to the terms but then violate them afterwards?

4. 4) One of your reporters has written a story based entirely on unclassified information that describes some aspect of the government’s anti-terrorism policies. A government official asks you not to publish the story because it might help terrorists avoid capture and plan future attacks. Do you run the story as is, kill the story, or run it after deleting sections the government objects to? 5) One of your photographers takes a powerful, graphic picture of a child accidentally killed by Australian forces during a major anti-terrorist operation. Do you print the photo on the front page, on a less prominent page or not at all?

5. Opposition to US and Australian involvement in the Vietnam War grew throughout the 1960s This opposition was a result of extensive media coverage, a disproportionate system of conscription and growing political consciousness amongst baby boomers By the end of 1967, with no end to the war in sight, many Americans started protesting against the war, chanting slogans such as “Hey, Hey, LBJ, how many kids do you kill today?” OPPOSITION TO VIETNAM

6. “I was having a pretty good time, enjoying life to the fullest when I received my call up notice. I was pretty upset about it. I didn’t particularly want to go into the Army” “Some people from the Save Our Sons movement came around home to see me and my folks, by that stage I had decided that conscription was in. It was the law and if it was good enough for all the other fellows to abide by it was good enough for me” Bob Hobbs, Infantry soldier in Vietnam SAVE OUR SONS

7. By August 1969, 55% of the population wanted Australians brought home from Vietnam In 1970, large anti-war demonstrations spread 8th May – 120,000 people throughout Australia demonstrated to end the war. The biggest marches were in Melbourne – 70,000 occupied the streets, with 100,000 taking part in a second moratorium on the 18th September AUSTRALIA

8. On the 2nd December 1972, the Australian Labor Party was elected, with Gough Whitlam as Prime Minister Conscription ended, draft resisters were released from jail On the 8th December, the last Australian troops left Vietnam. On the same day, President Nixon ordered renewed bombing of Hanoi On the 23rd January 1973, Nixon announced an agreement had been reached for “peace with honour” The last US troops left Vietnam on the 29th March 1973 In 1975, Australia closed its embassy in Saigon, the last Americans left on the 30th April and the communists captured the city VIETNAM WAR ENDS

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