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This e-learning resource is designed to help nurses, pharmacists and junior doctors understand quickly the concept of hospital-associated venous thromboembolism, how to prevent it and to identify which steps of the prevention pathway are necessary to audit. SESSION OVERVIEW.

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This e learning resource is designed to help nurses pharmacists and junior doctors understand quickly the concept of h

This e-learning resource is designed to help nurses, pharmacists and junior doctors

understand quickly the concept of hospital-associated venous thromboembolism, how to prevent it and to identify which steps of the prevention pathway are necessary to audit.


This e learning resource is designed to help nurses pharmacists and junior doctors understand quickly the concept of h

SESSION OVERVIEW pharmacists and junior doctors

The prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in hospitalised patients is a top clinical priority in

the NHS.

  • The National VTE Prevention Programme provides

  • a comprehensive, integrated and financially incentivised approach to prevent VTE.

  • In this course, you will learn how to assess a patient’s risk of VTE, choose a suitable prevention method (thromboprophylaxis), and audit these steps.


This e learning resource is designed to help nurses pharmacists and junior doctors understand quickly the concept of h

SESSION OVERVIEW pharmacists and junior doctors

CONTENTS

Learning objectives

About VTE

Prevention

VTE risk assessment

Prophylaxis decision making

Thromboprophylaxis

NICE quality standards

Audit

Case studies


This e learning resource is designed to help nurses pharmacists and junior doctors understand quickly the concept of h

LEARNING OBJECTIVES pharmacists and junior doctors

By the end of this training you will be able to:

  • Undertake a risk assessment for VTE

  • Appropriately select a method of

  • thromboprophylaxis and prescribe

  • thromboprophylaxis for an appropriate

  • duration

  • Participate in audit to assess the quality of

  • VTE prevention in your own work area


This e learning resource is designed to help nurses pharmacists and junior doctors understand quickly the concept of h

ABOUT VTE pharmacists and junior doctors

VTE is a common complication among hospital inpatients and contributes to longer hospital stays, morbidity, and mortality.


This e learning resource is designed to help nurses pharmacists and junior doctors understand quickly the concept of h

ABOUT VTE: DEEP VEIN THROMBOSIS AND PULMONARY EMBOLISM pharmacists and junior doctors

VTE is characterised by one or more blood clots (thrombus) that commonly occur in the deep veins in the leg (deep vein thrombosis, DVT) or in a pulmonary vessel (pulmonary embolism, PE) .

This image shows a DVT of the right leg; note the swelling and redness although some patients have no symptoms or signs.


This e learning resource is designed to help nurses pharmacists and junior doctors understand quickly the concept of h

ABOUT VTE: FATAL PULMONARY EMBOLISM pharmacists and junior doctors

The Government has highlighted that there are too many preventable deaths from VTE in hospitalised patients, with thousands of deaths a year attributed to VTE and with a financial cost estimated to be in excess of £600 million per annum.

This image shows a fatal PE apparent at autopsy.


This e learning resource is designed to help nurses pharmacists and junior doctors understand quickly the concept of h

ABOUT VTE: VIRCHOW’S TRIAD pharmacists and junior doctors

Thrombus formation and propagation depend on the presence of abnormalities of blood flow, vessel injury and changes in blood clotting components (known historically as Virchow’s triad). These abnormalities occur frequently when patients are hospitalised, for example for surgery.


This e learning resource is designed to help nurses pharmacists and junior doctors understand quickly the concept of h

ABOUT VTE: MAJOR ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY pharmacists and junior doctors

Examples of patients at risk of VTE are those admitted to hospital for elective orthopaedic surgery.

Venous stasis occurs after surgery, vessel wall injury and endothelial damage are apparent, and the surgical insult alters the blood clotting components, forming a microenvironment physically and biochemically favouring thrombus formation.

Further examples of patients at risk of VTE include surgical patients with a VTE risk factor, for example cancer and medical admissions if mobility is significantly reduced for 3 or more days.


This e learning resource is designed to help nurses pharmacists and junior doctors understand quickly the concept of h

PREVENTION OF HOSPITAL ASSOCIATED VTE pharmacists and junior doctors

The prevention of hospital associated VTE is now a clinical priority in the NHS and The National VTE Prevention Programme provides a comprehensive, integrated and financially incentivised approach to prevent VTE.

The Department of Health has defined hospital associated VTE as any VTE event occurring within 90 days of hospital admission/surgery.

The programme consists of a national tool for VTE risk assessment (published by the Department of Health) and a number of other related measures.


This e learning resource is designed to help nurses pharmacists and junior doctors understand quickly the concept of h

A NATIONAL GOAL FOR RISK ASSESSMENT pharmacists and junior doctors

Provision of census data for VTE risk assessment is compulsory within the NHS to meet a nationally agreed goal of reducing death and disability from VTE. The goal will be deemed to have been achieved if 90% of all hospital admissions have been assessed for VTE risk.


This e learning resource is designed to help nurses pharmacists and junior doctors understand quickly the concept of h

NICE GUIDELINES FOR PREVENTION pharmacists and junior doctors

NICE clinical guideline 92 gives comprehensive guidance on reducing the risk of VTE in hospitalised patients and on appropriate thromboprophylaxis.


This e learning resource is designed to help nurses pharmacists and junior doctors understand quickly the concept of h

NATIONAL CONTRACTING OF NHS SERVICES pharmacists and junior doctors

Acute NHS Trusts are required to report audits of thromboprophylaxis and undertake root cause analysis of any hospital-associated VTE cases that occur.

The primary aim of root cause analysis is to identify the root cause of the VTE in order to create effective corrective actions that will prevent the problem from re-occurring.


This e learning resource is designed to help nurses pharmacists and junior doctors understand quickly the concept of h

VTE RISK ASSESSMENT pharmacists and junior doctors

VTE risk assessment should be undertaken using the National risk assessment tool. In some Trusts, risk assessment is performed using an electronic tool, but in others the risk assessment is paper-based.

You may find that your Trust has implemented a

local approach to VTE risk assessment that incorporates the elements of the National

risk assessment tool. You should ensure you are familiar with your local VTE prevention policy.


This e learning resource is designed to help nurses pharmacists and junior doctors understand quickly the concept of h

VTE RISK ASSESSMENT: STEP ONE – ASSESS MOBILITY pharmacists and junior doctors

Step 1. Assess a patient’s mobility.

All surgical patients, and all medical patients with significantly reduced mobility, should be considered for further risk assessment.  

If a patient is a medical admission and not expected to be immobile, a simple tick completes the risk assessment process.


This e learning resource is designed to help nurses pharmacists and junior doctors understand quickly the concept of h

VTE RISK ASSESSMENT: STEP TWO – ASSESS RISK FACTORS pharmacists and junior doctors

Step 2. Assess the risk of VTE.

Any tick in these boxes indicates that the patient is at risk of VTE. For example, a patient with hip fracture is at risk of VTE.


This e learning resource is designed to help nurses pharmacists and junior doctors understand quickly the concept of h

VTE RISK ASSESSMENT: STEP THREE – ASSESS BLEEDING RISK pharmacists and junior doctors

Step 3. Assess the patient’s bleeding risk

The risk of bleeding must always be considered before prevention steps are taken.

Any tick should prompt clinical staff to consider if bleeding risk is sufficient to preclude pharmacological intervention. For example, a patient who is thrombocytopenic is at risk of bleeding.


This e learning resource is designed to help nurses pharmacists and junior doctors understand quickly the concept of h

THROMBOPROPHYLAXIS pharmacists and junior doctors

  • Thromboprophylaxis is defined as the use of medication or medical devices to prevent the formation of blood clots.

  • For all patients, three simple steps should be taken to reduce the risk of VTE:

  • Encourage mobilisation

  • Avoid dehydration

  • Reassess risk for VTE whenever clinical condition changes

  • For patients found to be at risk for VTE after a risk assessment, thromboprophylaxis should be prescribed.


This e learning resource is designed to help nurses pharmacists and junior doctors understand quickly the concept of h

TYPES OF THROMBOPROPHYLAXIS pharmacists and junior doctors

There are two type of thromboprophylaxis : mechanical and pharmacological.

The theory behind mechanicalapproaches is that they increase mean blood flow velocity in leg veins, reducing venous stasis. They are broadlyclassified as either static (anti-embolism stockings) or dynamic (intermittent pneumatic compression).  

Pharmacological agents prevent the formation of a venous thrombus and/or restrict its extension by directly altering the process of blood coagulation.

The most common agents used are unfractionated heparin (UFH) and low molecular weight heparin (LMWH). For elective total hip/knee replacement, the oral anticoagulants rivaroxaban or dabigatran can be used.


This e learning resource is designed to help nurses pharmacists and junior doctors understand quickly the concept of h

MECHANICAL PROPHYLAXIS pharmacists and junior doctors

This example shows a nurse fitting anti-embolism stockings, which are an example of static mechanical prophylaxis.

This example shows a nurse a nurse starting an intermittent pneumatic compression device, which is an example of dynamic mechanical prophylaxis.


This e learning resource is designed to help nurses pharmacists and junior doctors understand quickly the concept of h

CONTRAINDICATIONS TO STOCKINGS pharmacists and junior doctors

  • Do not offer anti-embolism stockings to patients who have:

  • Suspected or proven peripheral arterial disease

  • Peripheral arterial bypass grafting

  • Peripheral neuropathy or other causes of sensory

  • impairment

  • Any local conditions in which stockings may cause

  • damage, for example fragile ‘tissue paper’ skin,

  • dermatitis, gangrene or recent skin graft

  • Known allergy to material of manufacture

  • Cardiac failure

  • Severe leg oedema or pulmonary oedema from

  • congestive heart failure

  • Unusual leg size or shape

  • Major limb deformity preventing correct fit

  • Stroke (anti-embolism stockings only)

  • Confirmed/suspected DVT (intermittent pneumatic compression only)

This patient is suffering from peripheral vascular disease and mechanical methods of thromboprophylaxis are contraindicated.

Use caution/clinical judgement when applying anti-embolism stockings over venous ulcers or wounds.


This e learning resource is designed to help nurses pharmacists and junior doctors understand quickly the concept of h

CONTRAINDICATIONS TO PHARMACOLOGICAL PROPHYLAXIS pharmacists and junior doctors

  • Active bleeding

  • Platelet count <75x109/l

  • Untreated inherited bleeding disorder

  • Treatment with therapeutic anticoagulation (e.g. warfarin with INR>2)

  • Acquired bleeding disorder (e.g. liver disease)

  • If previous heparin-induced thrombocytopenia/allergy

This patient is suffering from an ulcer and pharmacological thromboprophylaxis is contraindicated.


This e learning resource is designed to help nurses pharmacists and junior doctors understand quickly the concept of h

PROPHYLAXIS AFTER EPIDURAL ANAESTHESIA pharmacists and junior doctors

Pharmacological thromboprophylaxis must be carefully timed to reduce the

risk of bleeding at the catheter site in patients undergoing epidural anaesthesia.


This e learning resource is designed to help nurses pharmacists and junior doctors understand quickly the concept of h

DURATION OF PROPHYLAXIS pharmacists and junior doctors

  • The duration of prophylaxis is dependent on a patient’s condition. The NICE guidelines make firm recommendations on how long it should be continued.

  • Continue until mobility returns to normal (see speciality specific advice to follow)

    • Usually 5-7 days

  • Major orthopaedic surgery

    • Total hip replacement/Hip fracture surgery

      • Continue for 28-35 days

    • Total knee replacement

      • Continue for 10-14days

  • Major surgery for cancer

  • Continue for 28-35 days


This e learning resource is designed to help nurses pharmacists and junior doctors understand quickly the concept of h

NICE GUIDELINES AID APPROPRIATE PROPHYLAXIS DECISION MAKING pharmacists and junior doctors

NICE clinical guideline 92 offers simple care pathways to direct risk assessment and prophylaxis decision making.  

Assessing the risk of VTE is the first and most important step in the pathway, fulfilling the compulsory audit requirements within the NHS and acting as the trigger to consider the need for prevention measures.


This e learning resource is designed to help nurses pharmacists and junior doctors understand quickly the concept of h

THROMBOPROPHYLAXIS RECOMMENDATIONS (LOW BLEEDING RISK) pharmacists and junior doctors

Increased risk of VTE (low bleeding risk)

 Dependent on the reason for admission, NICE recommends pharmacological prophylaxis and or mechanical methods. The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists make separate recommendations for obstetric patients.


This e learning resource is designed to help nurses pharmacists and junior doctors understand quickly the concept of h

THROMBOPROPHYLAXIS RECOMMENDATIONS (HIGH BLEEDING RISK) pharmacists and junior doctors

  • Increased risk of VTE (high bleeding risk)

  • NICE recommends considering mechanical methods of prophylaxis in patients with increased bleeding risk.  

  • Choose any one of:

  • anti-embolism stockings (thigh or knee length)

  • foot impulse devices

  • Intermittent pneumatic compression devices (thigh or knee length)


This e learning resource is designed to help nurses pharmacists and junior doctors understand quickly the concept of h

NICE QUALITY STANDARDS pharmacists and junior doctors

NICE has introduced seven quality standards for VTE prevention. The quality standards are a key part of making quality the organising principle of the NHS. They act as markers of high quality, cost effective patient care.

  • All patients, on admission, receive an assessment of VTE and bleeding risk using the clinical risk assessment criteria described in the national tool

  • Patients/carers are offered verbal and written information on VTE prevention as part of the admission process

  • Patients provided with anti-embolism stockings have them fitted and monitored in accordance with NICE guidance

  • Patients are re-assessed within 24 hours of admission for risk of VTE and bleeding

  • Patients assessed to be at risk of VTE are offered VTE prophylaxis in accordance with NICE guidance

  • Patients/carers are offered verbal and written information on VTE prevention as part of the discharge process

  • Patients are offered extended (post hospital) VTE prophylaxis in accordance with NICE guidance


This e learning resource is designed to help nurses pharmacists and junior doctors understand quickly the concept of h

NICE QUALITY STANDARDS: PATIENT INFORMATION pharmacists and junior doctors

A key aspect of the NICE quality standards is the need to offer patients and carers verbal and written information on VTE prevention, both at admission and as part of the discharge process.

Ensure you are familiar of your Trust’s VTE information leaflet and any other patient-related communication tools.


This e learning resource is designed to help nurses pharmacists and junior doctors understand quickly the concept of h

AUDIT pharmacists and junior doctors

  • Auditing the VTE prevention pathway is an important aspect of improving the quality of patient care. The elements listed should be subject to audit.

  • In addition, all Trusts must undertake root cause analysis of each case of hospital-associated VTE.

  • NHS Trusts are expected to audit the following:

  • Rates of mandatory risk assessment on admission and at 24 hours

  • Appropriate thromboprophylaxis rates

  • Appropriate measurement and monitoring of anti-embolism stockings

  • Patient counselling rates on admission and discharge


This e learning resource is designed to help nurses pharmacists and junior doctors understand quickly the concept of h

AUDIT: ROOT CAUSE ANALYSIS pharmacists and junior doctors

If a DVT or PE occurs while the patient is in hospital or up to 90 days from admission, then the clinical team should conduct a root cause analysis to attempt to understand why that patient suffered a thromboembolic event.

In this patient, ultrasound confirmed the

diagnosis of DVT. The superficial femoral

vein is occluded with the tongue of

Thrombus extending into the

common femoral vein.

Such a diagnosis within 90 days of

hospitalisation is classed as a hospital-associated VTE and should be reported to your local team for review and analysis.


This e learning resource is designed to help nurses pharmacists and junior doctors understand quickly the concept of h

CLINICAL CASE STUDIES pharmacists and junior doctors

  • CASE 1

  • A 55 year old female with a 3-year history of rheumatoid arthritis, currently treated with NSAIDs, is admitted for elective hip replacement.

  • Her haemoglobin is 12.9 g/dL and white cell count 13.5x109/L with a neutrophil leucocytosis.

  • Platelets and electrolytes are in the normal range, as is liver function.

  • Undertake a risk assessment

  • Select the correct form of thromboprophylaxis


This e learning resource is designed to help nurses pharmacists and junior doctors understand quickly the concept of h

CLINICAL CASE STUDIES pharmacists and junior doctors

A 55 year old female with a 3-year history of rheumatoid arthritis, currently treated with NSAIDs, is admitted for elective hip replacement. Her haemoglobin is 12.9 g/dL and white cell count 13.5x109/L with a neutrophil leucocytosis. Platelets and electrolytes are in the normal range, as is liver function.

  • CASE 1

  • Undertake a risk assessment

  • Low risk for VTE

  • High risk for VTE and low risk for bleeding

  • High risk for VTE and high risk for bleeding

  • Select the correct form of thromboprophylaxis

  • Pharmacological and mechanical thromboprophylaxis continued for duration of admission

  • Anti-embolism stockings throughout admission

  • Pharmacological and mechanical thromboprophylaxis throughout admission and continuing for 28-35 days post-operatively

  • Pharmacological and mechanical thromboprophylaxis throughout admission and for at least 7 days post-operatively


This e learning resource is designed to help nurses pharmacists and junior doctors understand quickly the concept of h

CLINICAL CASE STUDIES pharmacists and junior doctors

  • CASE 2

  • A 62 year old male is admitted with cellulitis of the upper limb, requiring intravenous antibiotics; there is no reduction in his mobility.

  • His FBC is normal, and his BMI is 25.

  • Undertake a risk assessment

  • Select the correct form of thromboprophylaxis


This e learning resource is designed to help nurses pharmacists and junior doctors understand quickly the concept of h

CLINICAL CASE STUDIES pharmacists and junior doctors

A 62 year old male is admitted with cellulitis of the upper limb, requiring intravenous antibiotics; there is no reduction in his mobility. His FBC is normal, and his BMI is 25.

  • CASE 2

  • Undertake a risk assessment

  • Low risk for VTE

  • High risk for VTE and low risk for bleeding

  • High risk for VTE and high risk for bleeding

  • Select the correct form of thromboprophylaxis

  • Anti-embolism stockings throughout the admission

  • One of LMWH or fondaparinux throughout the admission

  • No thromboprophylaxis is required, encourage mobilisation; review VTE risk assessment whenever his clinical condition changes

  • Either LMWH or fondaparinux and anti-embolism stockings throughout the admission


This e learning resource is designed to help nurses pharmacists and junior doctors understand quickly the concept of h

CLINICAL CASE STUDIES pharmacists and junior doctors

  • CASE 3

  • A 70 year old female is admitted with left sided weakness; a stroke is suspected, and an ischaemic stroke is confirmed on CT.

  • Undertake a risk assessment

  • Select the correct form of thromboprophylaxis


This e learning resource is designed to help nurses pharmacists and junior doctors understand quickly the concept of h

CLINICAL CASE STUDIES pharmacists and junior doctors

A 70 year old female is admitted with left sided weakness; a stroke is suspected, and an ischaemic stroke is confirmed on CT.

  • CASE 3

  • Undertake a risk assessment

  • Low risk for VTE

  • High risk for VTE and low risk for bleeding

  • High risk for VTE and high risk for bleeding

  • Select the correct form of thromboprophylaxis

  • Pharmacological and mechanical thromboprophylaxis until acute event resolved and clinical condition stabilised.

  • Antiembolism stockings until normal mobility regained.

  • Consider the risk of haemorrhagic transformation (bleeding into area of ischaemia) and if low prescribe pharmacological thromboprophylaxis until acute event resolves and patient’s clinical condition stabilises.

  • Antiembolism stockings and if low risk of haemorrhagic transformation (bleeding into area of ischaemia) prescribe pharmacological thromboprophylaxis until acute event resolved and patient’s clinical condition stabilises.