AGENDA
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 15

AGENDA : Bell Ringer (Review Chapter 8- Symbolism) Vocabulary Review Chapter 7 Read Chapters 9 PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 86 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

AGENDA : Bell Ringer (Review Chapter 8- Symbolism) Vocabulary Review Chapter 7 Read Chapters 9 Read Opening to Chapter 10 Exit Slip Homework-Chapter 11. Bell Ringer #4: (A) 4/19/11. In chapter 8 two things symbolize change and the lack of change the characters face.

Download Presentation

AGENDA : Bell Ringer (Review Chapter 8- Symbolism) Vocabulary Review Chapter 7 Read Chapters 9

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Agenda bell ringer review chapter 8 symbolism vocabulary review chapter 7 read chapters 9

AGENDA:

  • Bell Ringer (Review Chapter 8-

  • Symbolism)

  • Vocabulary

  • Review Chapter 7

  • Read Chapters 9

  • Read Opening to Chapter 10

  • Exit Slip

  • Homework-Chapter 11


Bell ringer 4 a 4 19 11

Bell Ringer #4: (A) 4/19/11

In chapter 8 two things symbolize change and the lack of change the characters face.

Symbol 1: The Snowman

a. What is the literal definition?

b. What is symbolic about the snowman?

c. How does ________ respond to the symbol?

Symbol 2: Miss Maudie’s Fire

a. What is the literal definition?

b. What is symbolic about the fire?

c. How does __________ respond to the fire?

Select a character for your response to part C: Scout, Jem, Miss Maudie or Atticus


Word work 4

Word Work #4

  • Inordinately (adj): disordered; not regulated, lacking restraint or moderation; too great or too many; immoderate

  • Lineaments (n): any of the features of the body, usually of the face, esp. with regard to its outline, a distinctive feature or characteristic

  • Analogous (adj.): similar or comparable in certain respects

  • Inconspicuous (adj): not conspicuous; hard to see or perceive; attracting little attention; not striking

    Today’s Word Work: Use each of these words in a sentence of your own!


Word work 41

Word Work #4

  • Inordinately (adj): disordered; not regulated, lacking restraint or moderation; too great or too many; immoderate

    “He wore a General Hood type beard of which he was inordinately vain.”

  • Lineaments (n): any of the features of the body, usually of the face, esp. with regard to its outline, a distinctive feature or characteristic

    “A flip of the coin revealed the uncompromising lineaments of Aunt Alexandra and Francis.”

  • Analogous (adj.): similar or comparable in certain respects

    “Had I ever harbored the mystical notions about mountains that seem to obsess lawyers and judges, Aunt Alexandra would have been analogous to Mount Everest: throughout my early life, she was cold and there.”

  • Inconspicuous (adj): not conspicuous; hard to see or perceive; attracting little attention; not striking

    “With these attributes, however, he would not remain as inconspicuous as we wished him to: that year, the school buzzed with talk about him defending Tom Robinson, none of which was complimentary.”


Review chapter 7

Review Chapter 7

1. What items do Scout and Jem find in the knothole?

2. What does Mr. Radley do to the tree at the end of the chapter?

What could have been Mr. Radley’s motivation for doing this?

Gray Twine, Soap Carvings, Chewing Gum, Spelling Bee Medal, Pocket Watch

Nathan Radley seals the tree with cement because he said the tree was dying.

Mr. Radley didn’t want Boo giving Jem and Scout any more “gifts”.


Review chapter 71

Review Chapter 7

  • A few days later, after school has begun for the year, Jem tells Scout that he found the pants mysteriously mended and hung neatly over the fence. When they come home from school that day, they find another present hidden in the knothole: a ball of gray twine. They leave it there for a few days, but no one takes it, so they claim it for their own.

  • Unsurprisingly, Scout is as unhappy in second grade as she was in first, but Jem promises her that school gets better the farther along one goes. Late that fall, another present appears in the knothole—two figures carved in soap to resemble Scout and Jem. The figures are followed in turn by chewing gum, a spelling bee medal, and an old pocket watch. The next day, Jem and Scout find that the knothole has been filled with cement. When Jem asks Mr. Radley (Nathan Radley, Boo’s brother) about the knothole the following day, Mr. Radley replies that he plugged the knothole because the tree is dying.


Review chapter 8

Review Chapter 8

  • For the first time in years, Maycomb endures a real winter. There is even light snowfall, an event rare enough for school to be closed. Jem and Scout haul as much snow as they could from Miss Maudie’s yard to their own. Since there is not enough snow to make a real snowman, they build a small figure out of dirt and cover it with snow. They make it look like Mr. Avery, an unpleasant man who lives down the street. The figure’s likeness to Mr. Avery is so strong that Atticus demands that they disguise it. Jem places Miss Maudie’s sunhat on its head and sticks her hedge clippers in its hands, much to her chagrin.

  • That night, Atticus wakes Scout and helps her put on her bathrobe and coat and goes outside with her and Jem. Miss Maudie’s house is on fire. The neighbors help her save her furniture, and the fire truck arrives in time to stop the fire from spreading to other houses, but Miss Maudie’s house burns to the ground. In the confusion, someone drapes a blanket over Scout. When Atticus later asks her about it, she has no idea who put it over her. Jem realizes that Boo Radley put it on her, and he reveals the whole story of the knothole, the presents, and the mended pants to Atticus. Atticus tells them to keep it to themselves, and Scout, realizing that Boo was just behind her, nearly throws up.

  • Despite having lost her house, Miss Maudie is cheerful the next day. She tells the children how much she hated her old home and that she is already planning to build a smaller house and plant a larger garden. She says that she wishes she had been there when Boo put the blanket on Scout to catch him in the act.


Chapter 9 questions

Chapter 9 Questions

  • Why does Scout beat up Cecil Jacobs and Cousin Francis?

  • Where do the Finches go for Christmas?

    Paraphrase and / or explain what Atticus means regarding the following:

  • His personal reasons for defending Tom Robinson (pp. 100-101)

  • “Simply because we were licked a hundred years before we started is no reason for us not to try to win” (p. 101)

  • “Don’t pay any attention to her, Jack. She’s trying you out. Cal says she’s been cussing fluently for a week, now.” (p. 104)

    Explain how the following people are related to Scout:

  • Alexandra

  • Francis

  • Jack

  • Jimmy

  • Atticus


Read chapter 9

Read Chapter 9

“If you shouldn’t be defendin‘ him, then why are you doin’ it?”

“For a number of reasons,” said Atticus. “The main one is, if I didn’t I couldn’t hold up my head in town, I couldn’t represent this county in the legislature, I couldn’t even tell you or Jem not to do something again.”


Read the opening of chapter 10

Read the Opening of Chapter 10

Atticus was feeble: he was nearly fifty. When Jem and I asked him why he was so old, he said he got started late, which we felt reflected upon his abilities and manliness. He was much older than the parents of our school contemporaries, and there was nothing Jem or I could say about him when our classmates said, “My father—”

Jem was football crazy. Atticus was never too tired to play keep-away, but when Jem wanted to tackle him Atticus would say, “I’m too old for that, son.” Our father didn’t do anything. He worked in an office, not in a drugstore. Atticus did not drive a dump-truck for the county, he was not the sheriff, he did not farm,

work in a garage, or do anything that could possibly arouse the admiration of

anyone.


Agenda bell ringer review chapter 8 symbolism vocabulary review chapter 7 read chapters 9

Besides that, he wore glasses. He was nearly blind in his left eye, and said left eyes were the tribal curse of the Finches. Whenever he wanted to see something well, he turned his head and looked from his right eye.

He did not do the things our schoolmates’ fathers did: he never went hunting, he did not play poker or fish or drink or smoke. He sat in the livingroom and read. With these attributes, however, he would not remain as inconspicuous as we wished him to: that year, the school buzzed with talk about him defending Tom Robinson, none of which was complimentary. After my bout with Cecil Jacobs when I committed myself to a policy of cowardice, word got around that Scout Finch wouldn’t fight any more, her daddy wouldn’t let her. This was not entirely correct: I wouldn’t fight publicly for Atticus, but the family was private ground. I would fight anyone from a third cousin upwards tooth and nail. Francis Hancock, for example, knew that.


Movie viewing of chapter 10

Movie Viewing of Chapter 10


Significant quote from chapter 10

Significant Quote from Chapter 10

  • Atticus said to Jem one day, “I’d rather you shot at tin cans in the back yard, but I know you’ll go after birds. Shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit ‘em, but remember it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.”

  • That was the only time I ever heard Atticus say it was a sin to do something, and I asked Miss Maudie about it.

  • “Your father’s right,” she said. “Mockingbirds don’t do one thing but make music for us to enjoy. They don’t eat up people’s gardens, don’t nest in corncribs, they don’t do one thing but sing their hearts out for us. That’s why it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.”


Exit slip

Exit Slip

  • Identify the ironic contrasts between Scout’s attitude and Atticus’s actions in chapter 10.

  • How might Atticus’s killing of the rabid dog foreshadow Atticus’s upcoming battle in court?

  • Explain the significance of the novel’s title.

  • Identify one character that serves as a symbol for the mockingbird. Justify your answer by incorporating the quote in your response.

    “Mockingbirds don’t do one thing but make music for us to enjoy. They don’t eat up people’s gardens, don’t nest in corncribs, they don’t do one thing but sing their hearts out for us. That’s why it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.”—Miss Maudie


Homework chapter 11

Homework: Chapter 11


  • Login