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Stuart Young . Business continuitY. Mission. To initiate, implement and embed Business Continuity Management (BCM) throughout KCC and then to promote Business Continuity planning by District Councils and industry in Kent, such that the resilience of the County is increased.

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slide1

Stuart Young

Business continuitY

slide2

Mission

To initiate, implement and embed

Business Continuity Management (BCM) throughout KCC and then to promote Business Continuity planning by District Councils and industry in Kent, such that the resilience of the County is increased.

Civil Contingencies Act (2004)

business continuity management it can t happen here crisis management and culture

Business Continuity Management‘It can’t happen here’:Crisis Management and Culture

slide5

Cultural filter

Propensity to

take risks

Rewards

Balancing

behaviour

Perceived

danger

"Accidents"

Cultural filter

John Adams\'s "risk thermostat"

crisis prone vs crisis prepared organisations

Profile of crisis-prone organisations

Profile of crisis-prepared organisations

Plans/

Policies/

Mechanisms

Few crises are prepared for

Plans are either non-existent or fragmented

5 or more crises are prepared for with integration amongst the crisis plans and they are integrated with business plans

Infrastructure

Organisational structure is inflexible

Organisational structure is flexible and adaptive

Rationalisation

Organisation is high in its use of rationalisations

Organisation is low in its use of rationalisations

Denial

High

Low

Crisis-prone vs. Crisis-prepared organisations

(Source: Mitroff et al., 1989:278)

slide7

MODELS OF CRISIS GENERATION

  • According to Perrow (1984) a systems perspective views disasters as :
          • Socio-technical events
          • Complex events
  • Soft systems methodology allows us to view disasters as
          • Rich pictures of complexity
  • Within a systems approach there are models that allow us to analyse why disasters happen and thus take mitigating action.
          • Turner’s ‘Incubation of disaster’
          • Toft and Reynolds ‘SFCRM Model’
          • Reason’s ‘Swiss Cheese Model’
          • Smith’s ‘Management Model’
slide8

MODELS OF DISASTER CAUSATION

Reason’s ‘Resident Pathogens and Swiss Cheese’ model ( 1990)

slide10

MODELS OF CRISIS GENERATION

The launch of Challenger on Tuesday 28th January 1986 was the 25th shuttle flight in 5 years and the 10th by Challenger.

It was the 2nd of 16 flights planned by NASA for 1986

The Space Shuttle Challenger Disaster

slide11

CHALLENGER

THE INQUIRY

  • The Rogers Commission for the disaster said:
    • NASA’s drive to create a launch schedule of 24 flights a year created pressure throughout the agency and directly contributed to unsafe launch operations
    • Pressure from the House Committee and Congress and the administration have played a contributing role in jeopardising the promotion of safety first attitude throughout the shuttle programme
    • Within NASA priorities shifted to “productivity at the cost of safety”
slide12

COLUMBIA

‘The Old Grey Lady’ 1st February 2003

Stage I:Notionally normal starting points.

Initial culturally accepted beliefs about the world and its hazards

Associated precautionary norms set out in laws, codes of practice, mores and folkways

slide13

COLUMBIA

Stage II:‘Incubation Period’

The accumulation of an unnoticed set of events which are at odds with the accepted beliefs about hazards and the norms for their avoidance.

‘Failure of Foresight’

slide14

Human created accidents

THE GREAT TRAIN RACE - SALISBURY 1906

slide15

The Worst Rail Accident EVER

800 French troops killed

Modane, France (1917)

slide16

Human created disasters

TEXAS CITY ”GRAND CAMP” explosion 1947

slide17

Examples of Human created accidents

CONCORDE PARIS - 25th July 2000

slide19

Humans vs Mother

titanic

Don’t Wait until it’s too late

slide20

RATIO of SURVIVORS

Class On BoardWomen & Children Men Total

1st 337 94% 31% 60%

2nd 285 81% 10% 44%

3rd 721 47% 14% 25%

Crew 885 87% 22% 24%

Total 2228

QUOTE

"When anyone asks me how I can best describe my experience in

nearly forty years at sea, I merely say, uneventful.

Of course there have been winter gales, and storms and fog and the like.

But in all my experience, I have never been in any accident …..

or any sort worth speaking about.

I have seen but one vessel in distress in all my years at sea.

I never saw a wreck and never have been wrecked nor was I ever in any predicament that threatened to end in disaster of any sort.”

  • Lifeboat Total Rated Capacity: 1,178 persons
  • Height: 60.5 feet waterline to Boat Deck

Edward J. Smith, 1907Captain, RMS Titanic

Captain Smith was planning to retire after the maiden voyage of Titanic

Survivors: 705Perished: 1523

slide22

Natural disasters

Triple earthquake

L ISBON 1755

slide23

Natural disasters

San Francisco 1989

slide29

Some typical business risks:-

  • loss of customer records
  • breakdown of the supply chain
  • failure of essential services on which
  • production or customer support depends
  • inability to deliver the product for a
  • significant period of time for any reason
  • negative perceptions of the company by
  • clients, customers or the public.
slide31

Business Continuity

Civil Contingencies ACT (CCA) 2004

slide33

PROMOTING BUSINESS CONTINUITY

“Local authorities to provide advice

and assistance to commercial activities

and voluntary groups”

Civil Contingencies Act 2004

slide34

Embedding BCM in the Organization\'s Culture

Understanding

the Organisation

Audit

BCM

Programme

Management

Exercising,

Maintaining

& Reviewing

Determining

BCM

Strategies

BS 25999

Developing and

Implementing

a BCM Response

slide35

STANDARDS

British Standard BS 25999

BS 25999 – part 1

Code of practice

BS 25999 – part 2

specification

what is most critical
What is most critical ?
  • Where does this happen ?
  • Who does it ?
  • What tools do they need ?
  • When do they do it ?
  • How quickly can the process be restored ?
  • How much business damage will occur until this is fixed ?

Will the business survive ?

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