Cheese
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Cheese. Cheeses. One of the oldest foods known to mankind. Appears from in everything, breakfast, snacks to dessert. Starts with mammals milk: cows, goats, sheep. Milk proteins, caesin are coagulated with the addition of an enzyme, usually rennet found in cows stomachs.

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Cheese

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Cheese

Cheese


Cheeses

Cheeses

  • One of the oldest foods known to mankind.

  • Appears from in everything, breakfast, snacks to dessert.

  • Starts with mammals milk: cows, goats, sheep.

  • Milk proteins, caesin are coagulated with the addition of an enzyme, usually rennet found in cows stomachs.

  • Milk coagulates, separates into solid curds and liquid whey.

  • Drain the whey curds = fresh cheese to make ricotta or cottage cheese.

  • Kneaded and cooked cheeses are packed into molds and drained.

  • Salt or bacteria is added to give it flavor and allowed to ripen.

http://www.5min.com/Video/How-to-Choose-Cheeses-for-a-Cheese-Plate-411070505

How its Made:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FHmXAb3G0ek


Ingredients

Ingredients

  • Rennet

  • According "the lining membrane of the fourth stomach of the calf, used to curdle milk, as in making cheese”

  • Used to describe any enzyme used to coagulate milk, and rennin and chymosin are enzymes found in rennet.

  • Milk:

  • Cow

  • Goat

  • Sheep: Pecorino


Cheese plate pointers

Cheese-plate pointers

  • Serve 1 to 2 ounces of cheese per person.

  • Include a mix of fresh, aged, soft and hard cheeses.

  • Arrange—and sample—the cheeses starting with the freshest and lightest, ending with the ripest and most intense.

  • http://www.foodandwine.com/creating-the-perfect-cheese-plate


Theme arrangement

Theme Arrangement

  • Select cheeses by REGION. Example: tasting of French cheeses including accompaniments

  • Select cheeses by MILK. Example: All sheep, All goat, All cows milk

  • Select cheeses by LOCALE.

    Example: choose all local products including accompaniments.

  • Select a plate for DESSERT.

    Example: pair with all fruits, and mellow flavors to pair well with sweet accompaniments

  • Allow 30-45 min. to temper the cheese for full flavor.

  • Wrap in paper not, plastic wrap to breath the cheese.


When to serve

When to Serve?

Starter Course:

  • Awakens taste buds

  • Choose cheeses at room temp or fried or baked in a crust of walnuts or almonds.

Accompaniments:

  • Cured olives

  • Pickled vegetables

  • Salted whole nuts

  • Crunchy crudites

  • Roasted or grilled veg.

  • Chutneys & mustards

  • Serve on informal plate

  • Serve w/ cocktails


Midmeal trasitional

Midmeal: trasitional

  • Follows the entrée

  • Included if you have several courses.

  • Shared with parties 3 or more or served on a smaller plate.

  • Usually paired with cocktails or wine/beer.

  • Cleans the palate.

  • Choose cheeses that are mellow in flavor non-robust.

  • http://www.eatwisconsincheese.com/pairings/default.aspx


End of the meal in place of dessert

End of the Meal: in place of dessert

  • Use fresh cheeses w/ memorable flavors to end the meal.

  • Fruit: Use apples, dried fruits, jellies, pears, figs, berries.

  • Nuts: Walnuts, Almonds, Pecans, Candied nuts

  • Honeys & Reductions

  • Pair w/ brandies, ports, dessert wines, cordials.


Categories

Categories

Textures:

  • Fresh Cheese

  • Semi-Soft

  • Soft Ripened

  • Firm Cheese

  • Hard Cheese


Fresh cheeses

Fresh Cheeses

  • Uncooked/Unripened

  • Fromage Blanc

  • Mild, creamy with tart tanginess.

    • Cream Cheese: 35%

    • Feta: salt brined

    • Marcarpone: 70-75%

    • Mozzarella: 45%

    • Ricotta: 4-10% fat

    • Queso Oaxaca: 45% fat


Semi soft cheeses

Semi soft cheeses

  • Include mild buttery cheeses, smooth sliceable textures.

  • Moisture content of 40-50%.

  • Aged from a few days to a few months.

  • Good for melting.

    • Cobrales: Spanish

    • Gorganzola: Italy

    • Gouda: Dutch

    • Stilton: Great Britain

    • Roquefort: France

    • Port du Salut: France


Soft ripened cheeses

Soft-Ripened Cheeses

  • Distinguished by their white "bloomy" rinds and creamy interiors

  • get softer instead of harder as they age.

    • The best-known are Brie and Camembert.


Surface ripened cheeses

Surface-ripened Cheeses

  • Sometimes firm and sometimes molten.

  • Have similarly wrinkly rinds and intensely flavored interiors.

  • Special molds ensure that their exteriors ripen first.


Firm cheeses

Firm Cheeses

  • Not hard or brittle

  • Aged from a few mo. to few years & longer.

  • Close-textured & flaky

  • Moisture 30-40%

    • Cheddars: North America, Australia, Great Britain

    • Emmenthaler: Swiss.

    • Gruyere:France

    • Comte: France

    • Manchego: Spain

    • Provolone: Italy


Hard cheeses

Hard Cheeses

  • Carefully aged for extended periods

  • Contain 30% moisture

  • Used for grating, salads or table cheese

  • Salty sharp taste.

    • Asiago

    • Parmigiano-Reggiano

    • Pecorino Romano


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