Wastewater Reuse: History, Issues and LCRA Projects

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2. Presentation Overview. Reuse DefinitionSB1 State Water PlanReuse in the U.S. / TexasRegulationsRatesLCRA Reuse ProjectsPotential Limitations of Reuse. 3. What is Reuse?. Terminology variesReuse water or wastewater, reclaimed water, recycled water.Definition for this presentationHighly tr
Wastewater Reuse: History, Issues and LCRA Projects

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1. 1 Wastewater Reuse: History, Issues and LCRA Projects Randy: Today we are going to provide you with a general overview of water reuse. The purpose of this presentation is to educate the Board about various aspects of wastewater reuse and brief the Board about what LCRA is doing and where we are headed in the area of wastewater reuse. Our overall goal with reuse is to optimize water used in the LCRA water service area. By promoting the beneficial reuse of water, we are also conserving water for the future.Randy: Today we are going to provide you with a general overview of water reuse. The purpose of this presentation is to educate the Board about various aspects of wastewater reuse and brief the Board about what LCRA is doing and where we are headed in the area of wastewater reuse. Our overall goal with reuse is to optimize water used in the LCRA water service area. By promoting the beneficial reuse of water, we are also conserving water for the future.

2. 2 Presentation Overview Reuse Definition SB1 State Water Plan Reuse in the U.S. / Texas Regulations Rates LCRA Reuse Projects Potential Limitations of Reuse As Randy said, our purpose today is to present you with a general overview of water reuse. In this presentation, we will first define wastewater reuse, will highlight places around the country and in Texas where wastewater is being reused, will review some safeguards for public health and safety, and go over what customers typically pay for reuse water. We will then look at what LCRA is doing in the area of wastewater reuse and briefly touch on some other issues that relate to reusing wastewater. As Randy said, our purpose today is to present you with a general overview of water reuse. In this presentation, we will first define wastewater reuse, will highlight places around the country and in Texas where wastewater is being reused, will review some safeguards for public health and safety, and go over what customers typically pay for reuse water. We will then look at what LCRA is doing in the area of wastewater reuse and briefly touch on some other issues that relate to reusing wastewater.

3. 3 What is Reuse? Terminology varies Reuse water or wastewater, reclaimed water, recycled water. Definition for this presentation Highly treated wastewater recycled for beneficial use.

4. 4 SB1 State Water Plan - Strategies to Meet 2050 Water Needs Existing Sources (Surface & Ground): 47% New Sources (Surface & Ground): 15% Conservation: 15% REUSE: 12% Interbasin Transfers: 11% (Source: Water for Texas Summary, TWDB, 2/2001) Reuse water currently provides about 3% of total water needs in the state. According to the 2001 State Water Plan, developed by the regional planning groups, reuse water has been identified as providing 12% of the state?s water needs in the year 2050. Reuse water currently provides about 3% of total water needs in the state. According to the 2001 State Water Plan, developed by the regional planning groups, reuse water has been identified as providing 12% of the state?s water needs in the year 2050.

5. 5 Applications of Reuse Water Agricultural: Food and Non-Food Crops Landscape: Golf Courses, Parks, ROWs, Residential Landscapes Industrial: Cooling Towers, Process Water, Cooling Ponds Surface Water / Groundwater Augmentation: Aquifer storage and recovery Reuse water has many applications. It is used in agriculture to irrigate both food and non- food crops. It is also used for landscape irrigation such as golf courses, parks, Road right of ways, and even residential landscapes. Reuse water has also been used for industrial purposes, such as water for cooling towers, process water in manufacturing and cooling pond makeup water. In some areas, reuse water is used to augment surface or groundwater. For example, reuse water keeps the San Antonio River in downtown San Antonio along the river walk flowing throughout the year. Also, the City of El Paso injects highly treated reclaimed water into its drinking water aquifer. The reclaimed water is withdrawn through separate water supplies after migrating through the aquifer. Reuse water has many applications. It is used in agriculture to irrigate both food and non- food crops. It is also used for landscape irrigation such as golf courses, parks, Road right of ways, and even residential landscapes. Reuse water has also been used for industrial purposes, such as water for cooling towers, process water in manufacturing and cooling pond makeup water. In some areas, reuse water is used to augment surface or groundwater. For example, reuse water keeps the San Antonio River in downtown San Antonio along the river walk flowing throughout the year. Also, the City of El Paso injects highly treated reclaimed water into its drinking water aquifer. The reclaimed water is withdrawn through separate water supplies after migrating through the aquifer.

6. 6 Water Reuse in the U.S. / Texas California ? Irvine Ranch Development Florida ? St. Petersburg Texas Agricultural, golf courses, El Paso Highland Lakes Discharge Ban ? Late 1980?s Water reuse Rules / Regulations adopted by TNRCC ? 1990, 1997 San Antonio, Austin, Lakeway MUD Calilfornia is the # 1 state for wastewater reused. The Irvine Ranch Water District, located in southern Orange County, is often mentioned as a model for reuse. The District serves approx 150,000 people. Nearly 80% of landscape irrigation is from recycled water. Several high rise buildings are also dual-piped so that recycled water can be used for toilet flushing. Florida is # 2, in terms of gallons of wastewater reused and # 1 in the # of reuse projects. St. Petersburg, in Florida, was the first city in the country to develop a dual piping - or distribution system, for residential landscape irrigation. The city?s 4 reclamation plants can treat a combined capacity of 68.4 million gallons daily for landscape irrigation. In 1998, Texas ranked 4th in mgd reuse water produced, although some experts estimate that Texas # 3.Calilfornia is the # 1 state for wastewater reused. The Irvine Ranch Water District, located in southern Orange County, is often mentioned as a model for reuse. The District serves approx 150,000 people. Nearly 80% of landscape irrigation is from recycled water. Several high rise buildings are also dual-piped so that recycled water can be used for toilet flushing. Florida is # 2, in terms of gallons of wastewater reused and # 1 in the # of reuse projects. St. Petersburg, in Florida, was the first city in the country to develop a dual piping - or distribution system, for residential landscape irrigation. The city?s 4 reclamation plants can treat a combined capacity of 68.4 million gallons daily for landscape irrigation. In 1998, Texas ranked 4th in mgd reuse water produced, although some experts estimate that Texas # 3.

7. 7 TCEQ Regulations Chapter 309, Water Code ? disposal of wastewater by irrigation. Chapter 210, Water Code ? beneficial reuse of wastewater on demand. Provides for design criteria, public notification, limits exposure to public.

8. 8 If you look at the bottom of this slide, you can see an example of the purple pipe that is required for reclaimed water. If you look at the bottom of this slide, you can see an example of the purple pipe that is required for reclaimed water.

9. 9 Here is a sign along a roadway in Lakeway MUD notifying the public that reclaimed water is being used in this area. Notice it is purple and is written in both English and Spanish.Here is a sign along a roadway in Lakeway MUD notifying the public that reclaimed water is being used in this area. Notice it is purple and is written in both English and Spanish.

10. 10 Proposed Revisions to the 210 Rules Why? Emphasize reuse water as a resource. Make rules compatible with SB1 planning.

11. 11 Examples of Recommended Revisions Define effluent, discard. Adopt ?lost water? approach as opposed to ?unauthorized discharge.? Allow reuse system flushing to wastewater system. Scientifically review data from Texas reuse systems.

12. 12 Chapter 288, Water Code Conservation Rule Revisions Require goals for gpcd > reuse helps. Includes indirect reuse.

13. 13 Rates for Wastewater Reuse AWWA / WEF: Average $0.51 per 1,000 gallons Range $0.14 to $3.13 per 1,000 gallons Usually 50% to 75% of treated drinking water rate. LCRA ? West Travis County System $1.10 per 1,000 gallons (combined with raw water).

14. 14 LCRA Wastewater Reuse Projects Camp Swift WWTP West Travis County Regional WWTP Brushy Creek Regional WWTP Williamson County Reuse Initiative The LCRA is also providing, or has plans to provide, reclaimed water from some of our wastewater facilities. LCRA first became involved in the reuse of wastewater in 1992 with the operation of the Camp Swift Wastewater Treatment Plant.The LCRA is also providing, or has plans to provide, reclaimed water from some of our wastewater facilities. LCRA first became involved in the reuse of wastewater in 1992 with the operation of the Camp Swift Wastewater Treatment Plant.

15. 15 The wastewater facility, located in Bastrop County treats approximately 350,000 gpd of wastewater from the federal prison, the M.D. Anderson Research Center near the treatment facility, and the Texas National Guard Camp Swift training facility. The effluent is then sprayed on a 132 acre pasture, where the land is leased for growing hay. The wastewater facility, located in Bastrop County treats approximately 350,000 gpd of wastewater from the federal prison, the M.D. Anderson Research Center near the treatment facility, and the Texas National Guard Camp Swift training facility. The effluent is then sprayed on a 132 acre pasture, where the land is leased for growing hay.

16. 16 LCRA Wastewater Reuse Projects Camp Swift WWTP West Travis County Regional WWTP Brushy Creek Regional WWTP Williamson County Reuse Initiative The West Travis County wastewater treatment plant is currently providing reclaimed water to the new Spanish Oaks golf course, just south of Hwy 71 in the Bee Caves area. The West Travis County wastewater treatment plant is currently providing reclaimed water to the new Spanish Oaks golf course, just south of Hwy 71 in the Bee Caves area.

17. 17 In addition, the Spillman tract is now using reclaimed water to develop its new PGA-designated golf course. This tract is located just north and west of the Hwy 71/620 intersection. Reclaimed water will also be used to irrigate commercial tracts, including the new hotel, roadway medians, and a multi-family housing unit. The WTC ww plant is currently supplying an average of 18,000 gallons a day, but will eventually provide up to 1 million gallons a day. Together, the Camp Swift, Brushy Creek and West Travis County reuse projects currently represent approximately 6.5% of all of the wastewater generated at LCRA wastewater utilities, or just over 800 acre feet of water per year. (groundwater - Camp Swift is 366 ac/ft, or 45% of total), rest is surface water.In addition, the Spillman tract is now using reclaimed water to develop its new PGA-designated golf course. This tract is located just north and west of the Hwy 71/620 intersection. Reclaimed water will also be used to irrigate commercial tracts, including the new hotel, roadway medians, and a multi-family housing unit. The WTC ww plant is currently supplying an average of 18,000 gallons a day, but will eventually provide up to 1 million gallons a day. Together, the Camp Swift, Brushy Creek and West Travis County reuse projects currently represent approximately 6.5% of all of the wastewater generated at LCRA wastewater utilities, or just over 800 acre feet of water per year. (groundwater - Camp Swift is 366 ac/ft, or 45% of total), rest is surface water.

18. 18 LCRA Wastewater Reuse Projects Camp Swift WWTP West Travis County Regional WWTP Brushy Creek Regional WWTP Williamson County Reuse Initiative In March of last year, HDR completed a master plan for reclaimed water from the Brushy Creek plant. (Brushy Creek Regional WWTP is located in Round Rock south of U.S. Hwy 79, east of I 35. It is owned by the LCRA and operated by BRA.)In March of last year, HDR completed a master plan for reclaimed water from the Brushy Creek plant. (Brushy Creek Regional WWTP is located in Round Rock south of U.S. Hwy 79, east of I 35. It is owned by the LCRA and operated by BRA.)

19. 19 This picture shows the reclaimed water pond at the Forrest Creek golf course in Round Rock, where LCRA provides water. Notice the signage by the pond area that stores the reclaimed water. This picture shows the reclaimed water pond at the Forrest Creek golf course in Round Rock, where LCRA provides water. Notice the signage by the pond area that stores the reclaimed water.

20. 20 LCRA Wastewater Reuse Projects Camp Swift WWTP Brushy Creek Regional WWTP West Travis County Regional WWTP Williamson County Reuse Initiative Federal funding (25%) through Bureau of Reclamation. Two other areas have also been identified as having potential for using reclaimed water. In Aug, 2001, HDR completed the Lower Brushy Creek Wastewater Master Plan. Future possibilities for using reclaimed water there include the Hutto school district, the Star Ranch and other developments. Another planning study is now underway for northwest Travis county, Preliminary study results recommend that LCRA construct a collection pipe to transport effluent from Jonestown to Cedar Park. This effluent would then be treated and used to irrigate the new course. The study also recommends that Leander use effluent from their ww plant to irrigate the Crystal Falls golf course. Two other areas have also been identified as having potential for using reclaimed water. In Aug, 2001, HDR completed the Lower Brushy Creek Wastewater Master Plan. Future possibilities for using reclaimed water there include the Hutto school district, the Star Ranch and other developments. Another planning study is now underway for northwest Travis county, Preliminary study results recommend that LCRA construct a collection pipe to transport effluent from Jonestown to Cedar Park. This effluent would then be treated and used to irrigate the new course. The study also recommends that Leander use effluent from their ww plant to irrigate the Crystal Falls golf course.

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22. 22 Water Reuse: Potential Limitations Water Rights Protection of senior water rights ? implicit or not Direct vs. Indirect reuse. Environmental flow needs ? streams, bays, estuaries. Water quality ? ?pollution? if not there. Funding ? Which customer should help pay? While reclaimed water can help stretch our water resources, there are also some limitations with reuse water. In the future, return flows will become more of an issue as the allocation of water gets tighter and tighter. Downstream water rights may limit the amount of wastewater available for reuse applications since many permits depend on upstream users returning flows to the stream. Another limitation may be the amount of return flows needed for environmental needs such as instream flows and bays and estuaries. In some areas, the water quality of the reuse water could be an issue for the water quality of the drinking water source. An example would be using reclaimed water over the Edwards Aquifer recharge zone. And finally, funding reuse projects is an issue, although this is true when developing any new water supply, whether it is for potable or for reclaimed water. While reclaimed water can help stretch our water resources, there are also some limitations with reuse water. In the future, return flows will become more of an issue as the allocation of water gets tighter and tighter. Downstream water rights may limit the amount of wastewater available for reuse applications since many permits depend on upstream users returning flows to the stream. Another limitation may be the amount of return flows needed for environmental needs such as instream flows and bays and estuaries. In some areas, the water quality of the reuse water could be an issue for the water quality of the drinking water source. An example would be using reclaimed water over the Edwards Aquifer recharge zone. And finally, funding reuse projects is an issue, although this is true when developing any new water supply, whether it is for potable or for reclaimed water.

23. 23 Questions


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