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The Open Memo Outline Common Errors Citation Exercises. Outline Common Errors Driver v. Office Depot. The Leader Board- Section F. Mondays 41 Layson 26 Mayhem in the a.m. 17 Johnson and Assoc. 17 Jackie Childs 15 Too earlies 15 Maples 14 Marshall 6 .

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the open memo outline common errors citation exercises
The Open Memo

Outline Common Errors

Citation Exercises

the leader board section f
The Leader Board- Section F
  • Mondays 41
  • Layson 26
  • Mayhem in the a.m. 17
  • Johnson and Assoc. 17
  • Jackie Childs 15
  • Too earlies 15
  • Maples 14
  • Marshall 6
the leader board section e
The Leader Board- Section E
  • Lucas, McTear, Paulk and Rumanek 34
  • Liles and Nix 27
  • Citators, L.L. P. 24
  • Free Lunch 25
  • MaGarry and Nail 21
  • Bluebook 15
  • Bluebook Beasts 7
  • Miller and Powell 19
quotations rule 5 1
Quotations; Rule 5.1
  • Heavy reliance on quotations is often a sign of inadequate analysis. You may be able to put the idea in your own words more effectivelyand efficiently.
  • You should notquote a court’s description of the facts.
longer quotations
Longer Quotations
  • Quotations of fifty ormore words should be indented left and rightwithout quotation marks.
  • Important statutes or restatement sections should also be “block quoted.”
quotations
Quotations
  • The citation for the block quote should not be indented but should begin at the left margin of the line immediately following the quotation (see page 44 of the bluebook).
  • Quotations of forty-nine or fewer words should be enclosed in quotation marks but not set off from the text. Use single marks for a quotation within a quotation.
punctuation in quotations
Punctuation in Quotations
  • Always place commas and periods inside the quotation marks.
  • Place other punctuation marks inside the quotation marks only if they are part of the matter quoted. Semicolons and colons otherwise go outsidequotation marks.
alterations in the text rule 5 21
Alterations in the Text;Rule 5.2
  • When a letter must be changed from upper to lower case, or vice versa, enclose it in [brackets]. Substituted words or letters should also be bracketed .
  • “[P]ublic confidence in the [adversary] system depends upon disclosure.”
alterations in the text rule 5 22
Alterations in the Text;Rule 5.2
  • Significant mistakes in the original should be followed by “[sic]” and otherwise left as they appear in the original.
  • “This list of statutes are [sic] necessarily incomplete.”
alterations in the text rule 5 23
Alterations in the Text;Rule 5.2
  • Indicate in a parenthetical clause after the citation any change of emphasis or omission of citations.
  • “The section applies to non consumers as well.” Fuller v. Jones, 99 So. 2d 74, 88 (Ala. 1988)(emphasis added).
omissions in text rule 5 31
Omissions in Text;Rule 5.3
  • When using quoted language as a phrase or clause, don’t indicate the omission.
  • Extreme and outrageous conduct is “utterly intolerable in a civilized society.”(Citation omitted).
omissions in text rule 5 32
Omissions in Text;Rule 5.3
  • When quoting language as a full sentence, omission of words is indicated by the insertion of an ellipsis, three periods separated by spaces and set off by a space before and after.
  • “Liability in such a case as this one depends upon . . . getting caught.” Seymour v. Butts, 106 So. 2d 175, 178 (Ala. 1980).
omissions in text rule 5 33
Omissions in Text;Rule 5.3
  • When quoting language as a full sentence, ellipses should never be used to begin a quotation. Capitalize and bracket the first letter if it is not already capitalized.
  • “[T]here is no duty to protect another person from the violent propensities of a third person.” (Citation omitted).
omissions in text rule 5 34
Omissions in Text;Rule 5.3
  • When quoting language as a full sentence, omission of the language at the end of a quoted sentence should be indicated by an ellipsis between the last word quoted and the final punctuation of the sentence quoted.
  • “Never count your chickens . . ..”
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