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Note that the following lectures include animations and PowerPoint effects such as fly ins and transitions that require you to be in PowerPoint's Slide Show mode (presentation mode). The Origin of Modern Astronomy. Chapter 4. Guidepost.

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Note that the following lectures include animations and PowerPoint effects such as fly ins and transitions that require you to be in PowerPoint's Slide Show mode (presentation mode).


The origin of modern astronomy

The Origin of Modern Astronomy PowerPoint effects such as fly ins and transitions that require you to be in PowerPoint's Slide Show mode

Chapter 4


Guidepost
Guidepost PowerPoint effects such as fly ins and transitions that require you to be in PowerPoint's Slide Show mode

The sun, moon, and planets sweep out a beautiful and complex dance across the heavens. Previous chapters have described that dance; this chapter describes how astronomers learned to understand what they saw in the sky and how that changed humanity’s understanding of what we are.

In learning to interpret what they saw, Renaissance astronomers invented a new way of knowing about nature, a way of knowing that we recognize today as modern science.

This chapter tells the story of heavenly motion from a cultural perspective. In the next chapter, we will give meaning to the motions in the sky by adding the ingredient Renaissance astronomers were missing—gravity.


Outline
Outline PowerPoint effects such as fly ins and transitions that require you to be in PowerPoint's Slide Show mode

I. The Roots of Astronomy

A. Archaeoastronomy

B. The Astronomy of Greece

C. The Ptolemaic Universe

II. The Copernican Revolution

A. Copernicus the Revolutionary

B. Galileo the Defender

III. The Puzzle of Planetary Motion

A. Tycho the Observer

B. Tycho Brahe's Legacy

C. Kepler the Analyst

D. Kepler's Three Laws of Planetary Motion

E. The Rudolphine Tables

IV. Modern Astronomy


The roots of astronomy
The Roots of Astronomy PowerPoint effects such as fly ins and transitions that require you to be in PowerPoint's Slide Show mode

  • Already in the stone and bronze ages, human cultures realized the cyclic nature of motions in the sky.

  • Monuments dating back to ~ 3000 B.C. show alignments with astronomical significance.

  • Those monuments were probably used as calendars or even to predict eclipses.


Stonehenge
Stonehenge PowerPoint effects such as fly ins and transitions that require you to be in PowerPoint's Slide Show mode

  • Constructed: 3000 – 1800 B.C.

Summer solstice

Heelstone

  • Alignments with locations of sunset, sunrise, moonset and moonrise at summer and winter solstices

  • Probably used as calendar.


Other examples all over the world
Other Examples All Over the World PowerPoint effects such as fly ins and transitions that require you to be in PowerPoint's Slide Show mode

Big Horn Medicine Wheel (Wyoming)


Other examples all over the world 2
Other Examples All Over the World (2) PowerPoint effects such as fly ins and transitions that require you to be in PowerPoint's Slide Show mode

Caracol (Maya culture, approx. A.D. 1000)


Ancient greek astronomers 1
Ancient Greek Astronomers (1) PowerPoint effects such as fly ins and transitions that require you to be in PowerPoint's Slide Show mode

  • Unfortunately, there are no written documents about the significance of stone and bronze age monuments.

  • First preserved written documents about ancient astronomy are from ancient Greek philosophy.

  • Greeks tried to understand the motions of the sky and describe them in terms of mathematical (not physical!) models.


Ancient greek astronomers 2
Ancient Greek Astronomers (2) PowerPoint effects such as fly ins and transitions that require you to be in PowerPoint's Slide Show mode

Models were generally wrong because they were based on wrong “first principles”, believed to be “obvious” and not questioned:

  • Geocentric Universe: Earth at the Center of the Universe.

  • “Perfect Heavens”: Motions of all celestial bodies described by motions involving objects of “perfect” shape, i.e., spheres or circles.


Ancient greek astronomers 3
Ancient Greek Astronomers (3) PowerPoint effects such as fly ins and transitions that require you to be in PowerPoint's Slide Show mode

  • Eudoxus (409 – 356 B.C.): Model of 27 nested spheres

  • Aristotle (384 – 322 B.C.), major authority of philosophy until the late middle ages: Universe can be divided in 2 parts:

1. Imperfect, changeable Earth,

2. Perfect Heavens (described by spheres)

  • He expanded Eudoxus’ Model to use 55 spheres.


Eratosthenes 200 b c calculation of the earth s radius
Eratosthenes (~ 200 B.C.): PowerPoint effects such as fly ins and transitions that require you to be in PowerPoint's Slide Show mode Calculation of the Earth’s radius

Angular distance between Syene and Alexandria: ~ 70

Linear distance between Syene and Alexandria: ~ 5,000 stadia

Earth Radius ~ 40,000 stadia (probably ~ 14 % too large) – better than any previous radius estimate.


Eratosthenes s experiment
Eratosthenes’s Experiment PowerPoint effects such as fly ins and transitions that require you to be in PowerPoint's Slide Show mode

(SLIDESHOW MODE ONLY)


Later refinements 2nd century b c
Later refinements (2nd century B.C.) PowerPoint effects such as fly ins and transitions that require you to be in PowerPoint's Slide Show mode

  • Hipparchus: Placing the Earth away from the centers of the “perfect spheres”

  • Ptolemy: Further refinements, including epicycles


Epicycles
Epicycles PowerPoint effects such as fly ins and transitions that require you to be in PowerPoint's Slide Show mode

Introduced to explain retrograde (westward) motion of planets

The Ptolemaic system was considered the “standard model” of the Universe until the Copernican Revolution.


Epicycles1
Epicycles PowerPoint effects such as fly ins and transitions that require you to be in PowerPoint's Slide Show mode

(SLIDESHOW MODE ONLY)


The copernican revolution
The Copernican Revolution PowerPoint effects such as fly ins and transitions that require you to be in PowerPoint's Slide Show mode

Nicolaus Copernicus (1473 – 1543):

Heliocentric Universe (Sun in the Center)


Copernicus new and correct explanation for retrograde motion of the planets
Copernicus’ new (and correct) explanation for retrograde motion of the planets

Retrograde (westward) motion of a planet occurs when the Earth passes the planet.

This made Ptolemy’s epicycles unnecessary.


Galileo galilei 1594 1642
Galileo Galilei (1594 – 1642) motion of the planets

  • Invented the modern view of science: Transition from a faith-based “science” to an observation-based science.

  • Greatly improved on the newly invented telescope technology. (But Galileo did NOT invent the telescope!)

  • Was the first to meticulously report telescope observations of the sky to support the Copernican Model of the Universe.


Major discoveries of galileo
Major Discoveries of Galileo motion of the planets

  • Moons of Jupiter

  • (4 Galilean moons)

(What he really saw)

  • Rings of Saturn

(What he really saw)


Major discoveries of galileo 2
Major Discoveries of Galileo (2) motion of the planets

  • Surface structures on the moon; first estimates of the height of mountains on the moon


Major discoveries of galileo 3
Major Discoveries of Galileo (3) motion of the planets

  • Sun spots (proving that the sun is not perfect!)


Major discoveries of galileo 4
Major Discoveries of Galileo (4) motion of the planets

  • Phases of Venus (including “full Venus”), proving that Venus orbits the sun, not the Earth!


Johannes kepler 1571 1630
Johannes Kepler (1571 – 1630) motion of the planets

  • Used the precise observational tables of Tycho Brahe (1546 – 1601) to study planetary motion mathematically.

  • Found a consistent description by abandoning both

  • Circular motion and

  • Uniform motion.

  • Planets move around the sun on elliptical paths, with non-uniform velocities.


Kepler s laws of planetary motion
Kepler’s Laws of Planetary Motion motion of the planets

  • The orbits of the planets are ellipses with the sun at one focus.

c

Eccentricity e = c/a


Eccentricities of ellipses
Eccentricities of Ellipses motion of the planets

1)

2)

3)

e = 0.1

e = 0.2

e = 0.02

5)

4)

e = 0.4

e = 0.6


Eccentricities of planetary orbits
Eccentricities of Planetary Orbits motion of the planets

Orbits of planets are virtually indistinguishable from circles:

Most extreme example:

Pluto: e = 0.248

Earth: e = 0.0167


Planetary orbits 2
Planetary Orbits (2) motion of the planets

  • A line from a planet to the sun sweeps over equal areas in equal intervals of time.

  • A planet’s orbital period (P) squared is proportional to its average distance from the sun (a) cubed:

(Py = period in years; aAU = distance in AU)

Py2 = aAU3


Historical overview
Historical Overview motion of the planets


New terms
New Terms motion of the planets

archaeoastronomy

eccentric

uniform circular motion

geocentric universe

parallax

retrograde motion

epicycle

deferent

equant

heliocentric universe

paradigm

ellipse

semimajor axis, a

eccentricity, e

hypothesis

theory

natural law


Discussion questions
Discussion Questions motion of the planets

1. Historian of science Thomas Kuhn has said that De Revolutionibus was a revolution-making book but not a revolutionary book. How was it an old-fashioned, classical book?

2. Why might Tycho Brahe have hesitated to hire Kepler? Why do you suppose he appointed Kepler his scientific heir?

3. How does the modern controversy over creationism and evolution reflect two ways of knowing about the physical world?


Quiz questions
Quiz Questions motion of the planets

1. Why are Stonehenge and The Big Horn Medicine Wheel thought to be ancient astronomical observatories?

a. Petroglyphs at each site describe how they were used to make observations.

b. Ancient Greek writings list the important discoveries made at each of these two sites.

c. Stones at each site aligned with significant rising and setting positions.

d. Both a and c above.

e. All of the above.


Quiz questions1
Quiz Questions motion of the planets

2. Plato proposed that all heavenly motion is

a. constantly changing

b. circular

c. uniform

d. Answers a and b above.

e. Answers b and c above.


Quiz questions2
Quiz Questions motion of the planets

3. How did Claudius Ptolemaeus account for the retrograde motion of the planets?

a. Planets slow down, stop, and then reverse their orbital direction around the Sun.

b. Inner planets orbit the Sun faster and pass outer planets as they orbit around the Sun.

c. Each planet moves on an epicycle, that in turn moves on a deferent that circles around Earth.

d. The Sun and Moon orbit Earth, whereas all the other planets orbit the Sun.

e. None of the above.


Quiz questions3
Quiz Questions motion of the planets

4. Who accurately determined the size of Earth by considering Sun angles at Syene and Alexandria?

a. Thales of Miletus (c. 624-547 BC)

b. Pythagoras (c. 570-500 BC)

c. Eudoxus (409-356 BC)

d. Aristotle (384-322 BC)

e. Eratosthenes (c. 200 BC)


Quiz questions4
Quiz Questions motion of the planets

5. One of the first principles of ancient astronomy is that the heavens beyond _____ are perfect, and the Earth is corrupt.

a. the atmosphere

b. the Sun

c. the Moon

d. Saturn

e. Pluto


Quiz questions5
Quiz Questions motion of the planets

6. Who taught that the Earth is stationary and at the center of the universe with the Sun, the Moon, and the planets moving around Earth in perfect circles?

a. Thales of Miletus (c. 624-547 BC)

b. Pythagoras (c. 570-500 BC)

c. Eudoxus (409-356 BC)

d. Aristotle (384-322 BC)

e. Eratosthenes (c. 200 BC)


Quiz questions6
Quiz Questions motion of the planets

7. How did Nicolaus Copernicus account for the retrograde motion of the planets?

a. Planets slow down, stop, and then reverse their orbital direction around the Earth.

b. Inner planets orbit the Sun faster and pass outer planets as they orbit around the Sun.

c. Each planet moves on an epicycle, that in turn moves on a deferent that circles around Earth.

d. The Sun and Moon orbit Earth, whereas all the other planets orbit the Sun.

e. None of the above.


Quiz questions7
Quiz Questions motion of the planets

8. What feature of Aristotle's model of the universe was included in the model proposed by Copernicus?

a. Earth is stationary and at the center.

b. Mercury and Venus move around the Sun.

c. Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn move around Earth.

d. Uniform circular motion.

e. Elliptical orbits.


Quiz questions8
Quiz Questions motion of the planets

9. Why did the model of the universe proposed by Copernicus gain support soon after its publication?

a. It more accurately predicted the position of planets.

b. It gave a better explanation for the phases of the Moon.

c. It was a more elegant explanation of retrograde motion.

d. The old system of Ptolemy was never very popular.

e. It displaced Earth from the center of the universe.


Quiz questions9
Quiz Questions motion of the planets

10. When Tycho observed the new star of 1572, he could detect no parallax. Why did that result undermine belief in the Ptolemaic system?

a. This star is closer than the Moon, and thus stars are not all at the same distance.

b. This star is closer than the Moon, and thus smaller than other stars.

c. This star is farther away than the Moon, and thus the heavens are perfect and unchanging.

d. This star is farther away than the Moon, and thus the heavens are not perfect and unchanging.

e. This star is planet-like.


Quiz questions10
Quiz Questions motion of the planets

11. What was the most important contribution of Tycho Brahe to modern astronomy?

a. The invention of the optical telescope.

b. The discovery of four moons orbiting Jupiter.

c. A model of the universe that was part Aristotelian and part Copernican.

d. The study of the Supernova of 1572.

e. Twenty years of accurate measurements of planetary positions.


Quiz questions11
Quiz Questions motion of the planets

12. How was Tycho Brahe able to make more accurate astronomical measurements than had been made before his time?

a. He used a telescope to magnify the image and spacing of celestial objects.

b. He designed and used large devices to measure small angles.

c. His island observatory was hundreds of miles offshore, under very dark skies.

d. His observatory was at high elevation and thus above much of Earth's atmosphere.

e. All of the above.


Quiz questions12
Quiz Questions motion of the planets

13. How did Kepler's first law of planetary motion alter the Copernican system?

a. It changed the perfect circles to ellipses.

b. It added epicycles to the perfect circles.

c. It placed the Sun at one focus of each orbit.

d. Answers a and c above.

e. Answers b and c above.


Quiz questions13
Quiz Questions motion of the planets

14. Which of the "First Principles of Ancient Astronomy" did Kepler's laws contradict?

a. Earth is at the center of the universe.

b. The heavens are perfect and Earth is imperfect.

c. All heavenly motion is uniform and circular.

d. Both a and b above.

e. Both a and c above.


Quiz questions14
Quiz Questions motion of the planets

15. What does Kepler's second law indicate about the orbital speed of a planet?

a. The orbital speed of each planet is constant.

b. A planet moves at its slowest when it is closest to the Sun.

c. A planet moves at its fastest when it is closest to the Sun.

d. The orbital speed of a planet varies in no predictable way.

e. None of the above.


Quiz questions15
Quiz Questions motion of the planets

16. If the semimajor axis of a planet is 4 AU, what is its orbital period?

a. 4 years.

b. 8 years.

c. 16 years.

d. 64 years.

e. It cannot be determined from the given information.


Quiz questions16
Quiz Questions motion of the planets

17. Galileo's discovery of four moons orbiting Jupiter showed that planetary bodies could move and carry moons. This supports the model of the universe presented by

a. Aristotle

b. Claudius Ptolemaeus

c. Nicolaus Copernicus

d. Both a and b above.

e. All of the above.


Quiz questions17
Quiz Questions motion of the planets

18. What phases of Venus are predicted by the Ptolemaic system?

a. New and Crescent phases only.

b. Quarter and Gibbous phases only.

c. Gibbous and Full phases only.

d. Crescent and Gibbous phases only.

e. New, Crescent, Quarter, Gibbous, and Full phases.


Quiz questions18
Quiz Questions motion of the planets

19. What phases of Venus were observed by Galileo?

a. New and Crescent phases only.

b. Quarter and Gibbous phases only.

c. Gibbous and Full phases only.

d. Crescent and Gibbous phases only.

e. New, Crescent, Quarter, Gibbous, and Full phases.


Quiz questions19
Quiz Questions motion of the planets

20. The phases of Venus observed by Galileo support the model of the universe presented by

a. Aristotle

b. Claudius Ptolemaeus

c. Nicolaus Copernicus

d. Both a and b above.

e. All of the above.


Answers
Answers motion of the planets

1. c

2. e

3. c

4. e

5. c

6. d

7. b

8. d

9. c

10. d

11. e

12. b

13. d

14. e

15. c

16. b

17. c

18. a

19. e

20. c


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