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ele:Vate Economic Literacy Education: Vital Assets for Transformation & Empowerment Training for the 3 rd “R”

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ele:Vate Economic Literacy Education: Vital Assets for Transformation & Empowerment Training for the 3 rd “R”. ele:Vate Mission : to help Christian community ministry practitioners educate and excite urban youth about economics, financial literacy, and entrepreneurship. .

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Presentation Transcript
slide1

ele:Vate

  • Economic Literacy Education:
  • Vital Assets for
  • Transformation & Empowerment
  • Training for the 3rd “R”
slide2

ele:Vate

  • Mission: to help Christian community ministry practitioners educate and excite urban youth about economics, financial literacy, and entrepreneurship.
slide3

CCDA’s 3rd “R”:

It’s About Community Economic Development

  • Developing the capacities and potentialities of people and of neighborhoods to bring greater hope and renewal to economically distressed areas
  • Small business development & job creation
  • Job training, job placement, job retention
  • Raising up indigenous entrepreneurs
  • Successful integration into the mainstream economy – e.g., managing credit, building assets
slide4

CCDA’s Method

  • With each of the 3 “R”s, workshops try to discuss…
  • WHAT it is
  • WHY it matters
  • WHAT the Word has to say about it
  • WHAT it looks like
  • HOW to advance it
  • HOW others have done it
slide5

This Workshop’s 2 Mandates

  • Lay the Biblical foundation or framework
  • (2) Offer introductory thoughts on practical application
slide6

The ele:Vate Workshop Track

Thurs 1:00: Biblical Foundations of Economic Literacy

Thurs 2:45: Economic Education for Urban Youth

Friday 1:00:Can you trust me with your credit card?

Friday 2:45: The Job Club

Sat 1:00-4:00 Creating True Wealth—Youth Entrepreneurship Parts I & II

slide7

FOUR BIBLICAL PARADIGMS

  • THE CREATION PARADIGM
  • THE CONSUMATION PARADIGM
  • THE WISE LAW PARADIGM
  • 4.THE KINGDOM PARADIGM
slide8

The CREATION Paradigm

  • 4 Central Themes
  • CREATIVITY: man is made in God’s image (Gen. 1:26). The main characteristic we see of God in this part of scripture is that God is creative.
  • 2. Our VICEREGENCY: God grants humankind dominion over nature, to steward it with authority, responsibility & care; man names things (Gen. 1:28-30; 2:15; 2:19)
  • 3. WORK that is pleasurable, fruitful, productive, satisfying
  • 4. FREEDOM (it’s implicit and makes possible the first three themes)
slide9

The CONSUMMATION Paradigm

  • Central Themes
  • Our VICEREGENCY: Rev. 22:5 talks about how we–the fully redeemed people of God–will reign forever and ever.
  • 2. We see CREATIVITY & pleasurable WORK
slide10

The Consummation Paradigm

A Radical Reality:

The kings of the earth will bring their splendor into it [the New Jerusalem].

-- Rev. 21:24

slide11

The WISE LAW Paradigm

  • Central Themes
  • Sabbath rest for people, animals, and land
  • Stewardship, not exploitation of nature
  • Individual responsibility & freedom
  • Just weights and measures (Lev 19:35-36)
  • Special safety nets for the widow, the orphan and the
  • stranger
  • Avoid sloth & folly (Prov. 12:27; 28:19)
  • Practice thrift (Prov. 21:20)
  • Future orientation (Prov. 13:22)
  • Invest and take risks (Prov. 31)
slide12

The KINGDOM Paradigm

  • Central Theme: Principles for our “In Between” Time
  • How God wants us to BE and to LIVE in this world that is still fallen but that has begun to be restored because the Kingdom has broken into it.
  • Continued assumptions (from the Wise Law)
  • But a new orientation, because of the Kingdom’s “now-ness”
slide13

The Kingdom Paradigm

  • SomeContinued assumptions
  • (from the Wise Law)
  • Necessity of hard work
  • Assumption of private property
  • Mercy and justice for the vulnerable
  • The folly of hoarding
  • The need for risk assessment
slide14

The Kingdom Paradigm

  • But A New Charge, in light of the Kingdom’s Presence:
  • How to give people a foretaste of the consummation?
  • How do we promote God’s ideal today?
slide15

Challenges of the Urban Ministry Setting

  • Economic distressed communities – few job opportunities, few home-owners
  • 2. Lack of hope for the future – crime, poor schools, domestic violence, drugs, unemployment all influence youth
  • 3. Street culture that vigorously promotes present-day orientation; “props”
  • 4. Socially isolated communities – lack of networks through which to hear about good opportunities; “spatial mismatch” of jobs and workers and poor public transport
  • 5. Less-than-ideal consumer habits – e.g., rent-to-own; little trust in/use of financial institutions (banks); high mark-up convenience shopping
  • 6. Economic injustices – redlining, lack of business entry, discrimination in hiring
slide16

Applications: What Can Ministries Do?

Sow hope!

(the Anathoth principle)

slide17

Applications: What Can Ministries Do?

  • Teach financial life skills
slide18

FAST FACTS:

Why Financial Literacy is SO Crucial

  • Only 10.2% of high school seniors score a “C” or better on the Basic
  • Financial Survival Skills Test.
  • 79% of students ages 16 through 22 have never taken a class in personal
  • finance.
  • 42% of teenagers between ages 18-19 have credit cards.
  • 64% of teenagers don’t know what an “interest rate” is.
  • Two-thirds of teens admit that they could use more lessons on money
  • management.
  • 70% of college students hold credit cards. One-fifth carry debts on these
  • cards of more than $10,000.
  • Average American household owns 14.7 bank, store, & credit cards & carries
  • an unpaid balance of $5900 on them!
  • In the 1998 "USA Weekend" survey, 42% of teenagers who responded
  • expect to earn $75,000 or more per year by age 30. (According to
  • government statistics, the average annual salary for a 30-year-old is
  • about $27,000.)
slide19

Applications: What Can Ministries Do?

  • Practice integration
  • into the economy
  • (as it is)
slide20

Applications: What Can Ministries Do?

Economic Justice Advocacy

(to reform it as it should be)

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