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Prepositions, Conjunctions, & Interjections. Prepositions. Prepositions connect another word in a sentence to a noun or pronoun (and its modifiers, if any) to form a prepositional phrase. Major fires raged across the park. They burned for eleven days .

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Prepositions
Prepositions

  • Prepositionsconnect another word in a sentence to a noun or pronoun (and its modifiers, if any) to form a prepositional phrase.

    Major fires raged across the park. They burned for eleven days.

  • Some prepositions are compound. They are made up of two or more words.

    We went to the game in spite of the rain.

    The roads were closed because of the race.


Prepositions1
Prepositions

  • Some words are both prepositions and adverbs. To tell the difference, look for a prepositional phrase. If the word is part of a prepositional phrase, it is a preposition. If not, it is an adverb.

    • ADVERBS In ten minutes, we will be through with this job.

  • “Move along,” shouted the cattle driver.

    • PREPOSITIONS I walked through the narrow hallway.

  • The news moved along the line quickly.

  • The word conjunction comes from two Latin sources: the prefix con-, meaning “together,” and the root junction, meaning “to join.”



Conjunctions
Conjunctions

  • The word conjunction comes from two Latin sources: the prefix con-, meaning “together,” and the root junction, meaning “to join.”

  • Conjunctions join words or groups of words.

  • Coordinating conjunctions join words or groups of words that are equal in importance.

    Don and Michael are twins. They look alike, but they don’t think alike.

  • Correlative conjunctions are always used in pairs.

    EitherJoan or I will win the scholarship.

    BothTim and Enrique are studying medicine.

  • The words or phrases joined by a pair of correlative conjunctions should be parallel.

    • INCORRECT Neither my mother nor father can play the piano.

    • CORRECT Neither my mother nor my father can play the piano.


Conjunctions1
Conjunctions

Coordinating ConjunctionsSome Correlative Conjunctions

andboth…and

noreither…or

sojust as…so (too)

butneither…nor

ornot only…but also

yetwhether…or



Interjections1
Interjections

  • Interjections express mild or strong emotion.

  • Interjections are the loneliest part of speech. They do not have a grammatical connection to any other part of a sentence. Set them off with a comma or an exclamation point.

    My, what a sad story.

    Hey! Come back here this minute!


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