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Steve Heminger Executive Director, MTC American Public Transportation Association Washington DC March 12, 2007 System Maintenance Pavement Ride Quality National Highway System for 2004 100% 91% 91% 91% 89% 80% 60% Acceptable 52% Good 50% 40% 48% 39% 20% 0% 1997 2000 2002

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Steve Heminger Executive Director, MTC American Public Transportation Association Washington DC March 12, 2007

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Steve HemingerExecutive Director, MTC

American Public Transportation Association

Washington DC

March 12, 2007


System Maintenance


Pavement Ride Quality

National Highway System for 2004

100%

91%

91%

91%

89%

80%

60%

Acceptable

52%

Good

50%

40%

48%

39%

20%

0%

1997

2000

2002

2004

Source: U.S. DOT


Transit System Conditions

3.47

3.50

3.48

3.42

3.38

3.05

3.07

3.08

2.88

2.94

Source: U.S. DOT


Traffic Congestion


In Congestion for At Least 40 Hours Annually

Source: Texas Transportation Institute


Growth in Transit Ridership

23% Growth in Total Ridership from 1995 to 2004

50%

40%

30%

20%

10%

0%

Heavy

Rail

Commuter

Rail

Light

Rail

Demand

Response

Motorbus

Vanpool

Ferryboat

Nearly half of the growth in total Transit Passenger Miles from 1995 to 2004 has come from the Heavy Rail mode.

Source: U.S. DOT


Safety


U.S. and G.B. Traffic Fatalities Per 100 Million VMT

Source: Leonard Evans, Traffic Safety, 2004


Freight


Dramatic Increase in U.S. Maritime Trade

15,835

59,420

2,557

1,776

4,478

Seattle

NY/NJ

4,396

1,798

5,566

1,809

Tacoma

Virginia

3,382

2,043

6,639

1,860

Oakland

Charleston

13,101

9,420

1,662

6,165

LA/LB

1,437

Savannah

2,152

1,010

Houston

(TEUs in thousands)

Miami

2004

Forecast figures based on 10-year linear regression

2020

Volume of trade: 2004 and 2020

Source: U.S. DOTv


Rail Network Today

Class I Railroads Track-Miles Owned

400,000

350,000

300,000

250,000

200,000

150,000

100,000

50,000

0

1830

1850

1870

1890

1910

1930

1950

1970

1990

2010

Sources: L. Thompson/World Bank and American Association of Railroads

Today’s rail network has been rationalized and downsized to a core network that is descended directly from the 19th Century design


Fuel Efficiency(“Energy Independence”)


230

59 percent more energy performance

2004

210

2003

2002

190

2001

2000

1999

1998

170

1997

1996

52 percentmore output

Horsepower

1995

1994

150

1993

1977

1992

1975

1991

1978

1990

1989

130

1976

1988

1979

1985

1987

1984

1980

110

1986

1983

1982

1981

0

0

12

14

16

18

20

22

24

Miles per Gallon

Sources: Environmental Protection Agency; Energy Information Administration

U.S. Fuel Economy for New Light-Duty Vehicles

1975–2004 Model Years Sales-Weighted Horsepower and MPG


Source: UC Berkeley

International Fuel Economy Comparison

Comparison of fleet average fuel economy and GHG emission standards for new-sale light-duty vehicles


What’s Broken?


Environmental Impact Statement

Processing Time (FY 1998–2006)

Source: FHWA


Length of Time to Complete the New Starts Process

Source: Holland & Knight


Finance


Estimated Highway and Transit Program Levels and HTF Account Balances*

Assuming Level Funding After 2009

50

Highway Program

40

30

20

Transit Program

10

Dollars (in Billions)

Transit Balance

0

-10

-20

Highway Balance

-30

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

-40

* Based on President’s 2006 Budget and 2006 Budget Mid Session Review revenue estimates


National Funding Gap

600

Cost toImprove

500

Cost toMaintain

Revenue

400

Gap to Improve = $107 Billion per year(through 2015)

Year-of-Expenditure Dollars (in Billions)

Gap to Maintain = $50 Billion per year(through 2015)

300

200

100

2006

2009

2012

2015

2018

2021

2024

2027

2030

Year

Source: U.S. Chamber of Commerce


Contact the commission at:info@surfacecommission.gov


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