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Classroom Instruction that Works by Robert J. Marzano, Debra Pickering and Jane E. Pollock Presenters Pam Lange & Lucy Atwood Classroom Instruction that Works Cues, Questions and Advance Organizers Setting Objectives and Providing Feedback Setting Objectives and Providing Feedback

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Classroom instruction that works by robert j marzano debra pickering and jane e pollock l.jpg
Classroom Instruction that WorksbyRobert J. Marzano, Debra Pickering and Jane E. Pollock

Presenters

Pam Lange & Lucy Atwood


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Classroom Instruction that Works

  • Cues, Questions and Advance Organizers

  • Setting Objectives and Providing Feedback


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Setting Objectives and Providing Feedback

Specific Behaviors:

  • setting specific learning goals at the beginning of a unit

  • asking students to set their own learning goals at the beginning of a unit

  • providing feedback on learning goals throughout the unit

  • asking students to keep track of their progress on learning goals

  • providing summative feedback at the end of a unit

  • asking students to assess themselves at the end of a unit


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Cues, Questions and Advance Organizers

Specific Behaviors:

  • prior to presenting new content, asking questions that help students recall what they might already know about the contentprior to presenting new content, providing students with direct links with what they have studied previously

  • prior to presenting new content, providing ways for students to organize or think about the content


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Advance Organizers

Presenter: Pam Lange


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Advance Organizers

Organizational frameworks

teachers present to students

prior to

teaching new content

to prepare them for what

they are about to learn.


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Advance Organizers . . .

  • take the surprise out of what is to come in the lesson.

  • help students retrieve what they already know about the topic.

  • focus on the new information.

  • help students get ready to learn facts and details about a topic.

    Most importantly, advance organizers help students get ready to use the information.


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Types of Advance Organizers

  • Expository – Straightforward descriptions of new content

  • Narrative – Stories (personal or real-world connections)

  • Skimming – Teach students proper way to skim information

  • Graphic Organizers – Visually represent information



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The Civil War when posting on the web.

  • Individually, you will have three minutes to fill out as many terms as you can think of dealing with The Civil War.

  • As a team, see how many letters of the alphabet you can fill in. It is okay if you do not fill in all boxes.

  • Are there any letters that a team is missing?



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Presenter: Lucy Atwood when posting on the web.

Setting Objectives and Providing Feedback


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Assignment when posting on the web.

  • Write one paragraph on the causes of the Civil War.

  • You have 3 minutes.

  • Exchange papers and score using rubric handed to you.


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Rubric Discussion Questions when posting on the web.

  • How did this make you feel?

  • How would a student have felt?

  • How often do we do this to students?

  • Should we have done anything beforehand?

  • If you could change one thing in your classroom after this experience, what would it be?


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Research Says… when posting on the web.

Research shows that setting objectives:

  • Narrows what students focus on,

  • Should not be too specific,

  • Entails encouraging students to personalize the teacher’s goals.


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Let’s Focus when posting on the web.

  • Learning goal: Understand and summarize causes, key events and effects of the American Civil War.

  • Example of student personalization:I know one cause of the Civil War was disagreement about slavery, but I want to understand who supported slavery, who was against slavery and why.


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Flash Forward when posting on the web.

  • Now write one paragraph describing what you know about who was for or against slavery and why.


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Providing Feedback when posting on the web.

Research shows that providing feedback:

  • Needs to be corrective,

  • Needs to be timely,

  • Needs to be criterion referenced

  • Students should provide some of their own feedback.


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Feedback when posting on the web.

  • Great job!

  • Nice going!

  • You can do better.

  • Way to go!

  • What were you thinking?

  • Your topic sentence was very clear and gave a good indication as to what your subject was about. Your paragraph still needs a conclusion.


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Slavery and the Civil War when posting on the web.

The Civil War occurred partly due to differing beliefs about slavery. Many plantation owners supported slavery because it was cost effective and they did not have the equipment to replace the manual labor. Many industrialists from the North were against slavery.


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Providing Feedback when posting on the web.

  • Again, exchange papers.

  • Using a sticky note, write one thing your partner did well and one thing that needs more work with regard to the learning objective.


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Let’s Focus when posting on the web.

  • Learning goal: and causes, key events and effects of the American Civil War.

  • Example of student personalization:I know one cause of the Civil War was disagreement about slavery, but I want to know who supported slavery, who were against slavery and why.

Understand

summarize


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Cues and Questions when posting on the web.

Presenter: Pam Lange


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The Purpose of Questioning when posting on the web.

Effective questioning is one of the most accessible strategies for K-12 teachers to use to develop both the cognitive and attitudinal skills that lead to success in life and school.


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Cues and Questions when posting on the web.

  • Explicit reminders or hints about what students are about to experience.

  • Triggers what students already know.

  • Prior to teaching, create appropriate questions and cues to use at the beginning of class.


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Questioning when posting on the web.

  • Inferential Questions: Help students fill in gaps from a lesson, an activity, or a reading.

  • Analytical Questions: Require students to analyze and even critique the information presented to them.


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Questioning when posting on the web.

  • Why question?

  • What is it used for?

  • Does it make a difference?

  • When should we concentrate on questioning?


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Questioning Rules to Keep in Mind when posting on the web.

  • Who? What? When? questions sometimes lead to dead ends.

  • Why? How? questions may be more fruitful.

  • When developing units/lessons/activities, generate at least two questions you want the students to be able to answer during or after the unit/lesson/activity is completed.


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What Were We Thinking . . . when posting on the web.

  • Group together in twos.

  • Determine who will be Partner A and who will be Partner B.

  • Partner A will come up and get the handout.


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What were you feeling? when posting on the web.

  • Were you stressed out?

  • Do you think we stress students out?

  • What do you think would have happened if you would have been given longer to answer the questions?

  • Were there questions that were easier to answer? More difficult? Which ones?


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Silence/Wait Time when posting on the web.

  • After a question.

  • After a response.

  • Before responding.

Increases the length of response.

Confidence increases.

More probing for clarification.

More questions are asked by the responder.

Responder makes more inferences and supports it with data.


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Silence/Wait Time when posting on the web.

As teachers, we need to be very conscious of wait time.

  • Research shows that teachers typically wait less than 1 second after posing a question.

  • After a student replies to a question, teachers generally wait less than 1 second before commenting or asking another question.


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Good Luck! when posting on the web.

Evaluation and Pledge

Pam Lange, [email protected]

Lucy Atwood, [email protected]


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