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Force and the resulting motion. Dynamics. Unification Theory). Force (Modern). Basic Idea of Forces. Push or Pull. Influence. Types of Influence. Contact. No contact. The push or pull is delivered through contact. Examples are kick, tug, punch, heave, friction, buoyant force, etc.

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Unification theory

Unification Theory)

Force (Modern)


Basic idea of forces
Basic Idea of Forces

Push or Pull

Influence


Types of influence
Types of Influence

Contact

No contact

The push or pull is delivered through contact.

Examples are kick, tug, punch, heave, friction, buoyant force, etc.

The influence is delivered through space without contact.

Examples are magnetic, electric, gravity, etc.



Note

  • Electromagnetic force results from the interactions defined by law of poles and law of charges, in the basic level.

    • Involves the concept that a proton attracts an electron; an electron repels another electron.

  • Gravitational force is present between matter as a result of their mass.

    • Greater mass, greater gravity; reduce the distance by half, the force becomes four times as great.



Note

  • Strong nuclear force keeps the nucleus together.

  • Weak nuclear force rips apart nucleons into other particles: beta decay

    • Involves the release of neutrinos and positrons




http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2008/03/god-particle/achenbach-texthttp://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2008/03/god-particle/achenbach-text


Newton s laws of motion

Newton’s Laws of Motionhttp://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2008/03/god-particle/achenbach-text

Force (Classical)


Aristotelian vs galilean motion
Aristotelian vs. Galilean Motionhttp://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2008/03/god-particle/achenbach-text


Aristotelian vs galilean motion1
Aristotelian vs. Galilean Motionhttp://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2008/03/god-particle/achenbach-text


Aristotelian
Aristotelianhttp://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2008/03/god-particle/achenbach-text

Why do objects differ in the way they fall?

A rock would fall faster than a leaf,

smoke tends to rise

and flame always point upward.

Generally motion in the vertical

Movement of celestial objects: stars, sun, moon, planets.

Movement that results from an application of an effort

Natural

Motion

Celestial Motion

Violent Motion


Aristotelian1
Aristotelianhttp://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2008/03/god-particle/achenbach-text

For Aristotle, the natural tendency of an object is to be in its stable state (stay in its proper hierarchy).

For violent motion to persist, a constant effort must be exerted on the object.


Galilean
Galileanhttp://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2008/03/god-particle/achenbach-text

Wait, there’s a lot of problems in the natural setting. I will proceed with reason and experiments in my mind.


Thought experiments
Thought Experimentshttp://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2008/03/god-particle/achenbach-text

First Observation: The roughness of the surface (takes something) reduces the speed of the object


Thought experiments1
Thought Experimentshttp://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2008/03/god-particle/achenbach-text

First Observation: The roughness of the surface (takes something) reduces the speed of the object


Thought experiments2
Thought Experimentshttp://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2008/03/god-particle/achenbach-text

First Observation: The roughness of the surface (takes something) reduces the speed of the object

Rough surface

Smooth surface


Thought experiments3
Thought Experimentshttp://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2008/03/god-particle/achenbach-text

First Observation: The roughness of the surface (takes something) reduces the speed of the object

Perfectly smooth surface


Thought experiments4
Thought Experimentshttp://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2008/03/god-particle/achenbach-text

Second Observation: The motion of an object is affected by a slope


Thought experiments5
Thought Experimentshttp://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2008/03/god-particle/achenbach-text

Third Observation: An object that is not moving will stay in that way unless an effort is exerted on it.


Galilean1
Galileanhttp://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2008/03/god-particle/achenbach-text

Therefore I can say that no effort is required to keep an object moving. No effort is required to keep it at rest.


Galilean2
Galileanhttp://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2008/03/god-particle/achenbach-text

That means, the natural tendency of every object is to maintain its state of motion.

I will call that property as inertia.

Inertia comes from the Latin word iners, which means idle or lazy.


Galilean3
Galileanhttp://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2008/03/god-particle/achenbach-text

To change state of motion, apply an effort on the object.

If it resists, still that is inertia.


Galilean4
Galileanhttp://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2008/03/god-particle/achenbach-text

To change state of motion, apply an effort on the object.

If it resists, still that is inertia.


I will make that into a law!!http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2008/03/god-particle/achenbach-text

Law of Inertia


  • Born premature, three months after his father’s death, Isaac Newton Sr.

  • At 3, his mother remarried. He was left at the care of grandparents. “Threatening my father and mother Smith to burn them and the house over them.”

  • Early part of his education… a school drop out… Asperger syndrome.

  • At 16, his mother (now widowed again) tried to make a farmer out of him. The legend of the falling apple.

  • Returned back to school, “motivated partly by revenge to a schoolyard bully, he became the top-ranked student.”

  • Undistinguished as a Cambridge student. Advancement in mathematics and science and all that came from it, including calculus and mechanics fundamentally grow from seclusion to self-study.


Newton s three laws of motion
Newton’s Three Laws of Motion Isaac Newton Sr.

Law of Inertia – every object maintains its state of motion unless a net force acts on it.

Law of Acceleration – the change in the state of motion of an object is directly proportional to the net force acting on it, but inversely proportional to its mass.

Law of Interaction – for every action, there is an equal but opposite reaction.


Law of inertia – every object tends to maintain its state of motion unless a net force acts on it.

So an object maintains its motion if there is no net force or zero total force acting on the object.


Review on the concept of resultant vector
Review on the concept of resultant vector. of motion unless a

What is the resultant of the following vectors:

30 newtons East

50 newtons West

20 newtons East


Changes in the state of motion
Changes in the state of motion of motion unless a

  • Change in the direction

  • Change in the speed

  • In short, changes in velocity are changes in the state of motion.



Summary
Summary an object?

  • Inertia is the resistance of an object to changes in its state of motion.

  • Inertia is the property of matter to maintain its state of motion.

  • Without external forces, an object at rest will remain at rest.

  • Without external forces, a moved object will proceed in a straight line at constant velocity.

  • Inertia is measured by mass.



Law of acceleration
Law of acceleration present?

Acceleration of an object is directly proportional to the net force applied on it but inversely proportional to its mass.


Problem: According to Law of Gravitation, greater mass results to greater gravitational attraction. Then why do objects fall at the same rate when one experiences greater force?


Basic computations of forces
Basic computations of forces results to greater gravitational attraction. Then why do objects fall at the same rate when one experiences greater force?


Summary1
Summary results to greater gravitational attraction. Then why do objects fall at the same rate when one experiences greater force?

  • Law of Inertia

    • ΣF = 0 ; the object has zero acceleration (at rest, constant velocity

  • Law of Acceleration

    • ΣF = ma; the object is accelerated (the direction of acceleration is the same as the direction of the net force)

  • Law of Interaction

    • F action = F reaction


Variations on the application of newton s laws
Variations on the Application of Newton’s Laws results to greater gravitational attraction. Then why do objects fall at the same rate when one experiences greater force?

  • The simple force plus kinematics equation

  • The Atwood machine

  • The frictionless slope

  • Friction plus the three above


Example
Example results to greater gravitational attraction. Then why do objects fall at the same rate when one experiences greater force?

  • A 1.0kg object is brought to Mercury where the acceleration due to gravity is 0.38 times its value on Earth.

    • What is the weight of the object on Earth?

    • What is the mass of the object on Mercury?

    • What is its weight on planet Mercury?


Example1
Example results to greater gravitational attraction. Then why do objects fall at the same rate when one experiences greater force?

  • A 10 kg object resting on a frictionless surface is subjected to two forces: F1=30N directed east and F2=50N directed west.

    • Find its acceleration

    • Find its displacement after 10s starting from rest.


Example2
Example results to greater gravitational attraction. Then why do objects fall at the same rate when one experiences greater force?

What is the acceleration of a 100kg object when subjected to a 10 N of force? If it starts from rest, what is its speed after 5 seconds? Ignore friction.


Quiz results to greater gravitational attraction. Then why do objects fall at the same rate when one experiences greater force?

If a force of 15.0 N directed East acts on a stationary 5.0 kg mass, what are its acceleration (include direction), displacement and velocity after 10.0 seconds?


What are the treads for
What are the treads for? results to greater gravitational attraction. Then why do objects fall at the same rate when one experiences greater force?


No treads for a race car
No treads for a race car? results to greater gravitational attraction. Then why do objects fall at the same rate when one experiences greater force?


Air resistance is air friction
Air resistance is air friction results to greater gravitational attraction. Then why do objects fall at the same rate when one experiences greater force?

  • Dependent on the surface area that is perpendicular to the direction of motion

  • Affected by streamlines

  • Affected by the speed of the object


Aerodynamics
Aerodynamics results to greater gravitational attraction. Then why do objects fall at the same rate when one experiences greater force?


Streamlines
Streamlines results to greater gravitational attraction. Then why do objects fall at the same rate when one experiences greater force?


Decreasing the drag air friction
Decreasing the drag (air friction) results to greater gravitational attraction. Then why do objects fall at the same rate when one experiences greater force?


Decreasing the drag air friction1
Decreasing the drag (air friction) results to greater gravitational attraction. Then why do objects fall at the same rate when one experiences greater force?


Streamline test
Streamline Test results to greater gravitational attraction. Then why do objects fall at the same rate when one experiences greater force?


Review
Review results to greater gravitational attraction. Then why do objects fall at the same rate when one experiences greater force?

  • If forces are balanced, the net force is zero.

  • If the net force is zero, the object is either at rest or at constant velocity.


Terminal velocity
Terminal Velocity results to greater gravitational attraction. Then why do objects fall at the same rate when one experiences greater force?


Characteristics of friction
Characteristics of Friction results to greater gravitational attraction. Then why do objects fall at the same rate when one experiences greater force?

  • Independent of the surface area; generally not affected by the surface area

  • Not affected by speed (though friction is less when the object started moving)

  • Mostly dependent on the weight of the object; and,

  • Nature of the surfaces in contact

  • A reaction force; does not exist by itself

  • Opposes the direction of motion or impending motion


Why on weight and not on area
Why on weight and not on area? results to greater gravitational attraction. Then why do objects fall at the same rate when one experiences greater force?


Problem solving in friction is fun
Problem Solving in friction is results to greater gravitational attraction. Then why do objects fall at the same rate when one experiences greater force?fun

f – friction, whether static or kinetic

u- coefficient of friction of the surfaces

in contact

n – normal force


Guidelines
Guidelines results to greater gravitational attraction. Then why do objects fall at the same rate when one experiences greater force?

  • If the object of analysis is not moving, the convention for positive and negative directions applies.

  • If the object of analysis is accelerated, the positive direction follows the direction of acceleration (second law).


Solving an atwood machine
Solving an Atwood machine results to greater gravitational attraction. Then why do objects fall at the same rate when one experiences greater force?

What must be the acceleration of the system on the left if m1 = 5.00 kg and m2 = 8.00 kg? What magnitude of tension is present on the string? Assume that the pulley is frictionless.

m2

m1


Sample
Sample results to greater gravitational attraction. Then why do objects fall at the same rate when one experiences greater force?

Find the tension between m1=5.00kg and m2=8.00 kg below as they are pulled by a 500.N of force in the direction shown, if the coefficient of friction for both objects is 0.600.

Determine also the acceleration of the system as the force is applied.

500. N

m1

m2


Sample1
Sample results to greater gravitational attraction. Then why do objects fall at the same rate when one experiences greater force?

  • Block A weighs 2.70N and B weighs 5.40N. The coefficient of kinetic friction between all surfaces in contact is 0.25. Find the magnitude of force F necessary to drag block B to the left at constant speed.

A

F = ?

B


Sample2
Sample results to greater gravitational attraction. Then why do objects fall at the same rate when one experiences greater force?

A 3.00 kg object slides down at a constant velocity of 2.00 m/s down a 3o.0o slope. What must be the coefficient of kinetic friction between the object and the surface?


Sample3
Sample results to greater gravitational attraction. Then why do objects fall at the same rate when one experiences greater force?

A 1.00 kg book is pressed against a vertical wall. If the coefficient of static friction is 0.250, what minimum horizontal force is required to press it at rest on the wall?

F = ?


Exercises
Exercises results to greater gravitational attraction. Then why do objects fall at the same rate when one experiences greater force?

  • Solve Problem #3 and #9 on pages 102-103.


Seatwork 25 points
Seatwork (25 points) results to greater gravitational attraction. Then why do objects fall at the same rate when one experiences greater force?

  • #4a and 4b 15 minutes

  • #5a 5 minutes

  • #5b 5 minutes

  • #5c 5 minutes


#4 results to greater gravitational attraction. Then why do objects fall at the same rate when one experiences greater force?

A 2.00 kg mass resting on a plane inclined at an angle of 40.0o with the horizontal is attached to a hanging mass by means of a frictionless pulley as shown. The hanging mass takes 1.62 seconds to fall through a distance of 1.52 meters starting from rest. What is the mass of the hanging mass if (a) the inclined surface is frictionless? (b) if coefficient of friction between the sliding mass and surface is 0.2?


#5 results to greater gravitational attraction. Then why do objects fall at the same rate when one experiences greater force?

  • Two blocks A and B are connected by a rope and attached to the ceiling by another rope. The mass of block A is 6.00 kg; the mass of block B is 4.50 kg. Find the tensions in the rope when the elevator (a) is at rest, (b) accelerates upward at 2.00 m/s2, and (c) accelerates downward at 2.00 m/s2


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