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Trees with edible parts in forest and agroforests in Jambi landscape. Hesti L. Tata, Subekti Rahayu, Harti Ningsih World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF-SEA). Presentation Outline:. Population vs rice production Rubber agroforests (RAF) Brief description of research sites

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Trees with edible parts in forest and agroforests in Jambi landscape

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Trees with edible parts in forest and agroforests in Jambi landscape

Hesti L. Tata, Subekti Rahayu, HartiNingsih

World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF-SEA)

World Agroforestry Centre


Presentation Outline:

  • Population vs rice production

  • Rubber agroforests (RAF)

  • Brief description of research sites

  • Tree diversity of forest and RAF

  • Trees with edible parts

  • Similarity between forest and RAF

  • Challenges of agroforestry systems

World Agroforestry Centre


Population vs Rice Production

Source: Statistics Indonesia, 2012

  • Indonesia is the largest rice consumer. Rice consumption is 140kg of rice per person per year.

  • - MDG1: eradicate poverty and hunger.

  • - Challenges for agroforestry systems to provide food in mix-planting between trees and crops.

Source: Statistics Indonesia, 2012

World Agroforestry Centre


RUBBER AGROFOREST

Complex RAF

Rubber monoculture

Simple RAF

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Site characteristics

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2008

Landcover change in Bungo district in 1973-2008

Source: Landscape Mosaic Bungo Team (2008)

  • Drivers for deforestation at landscape level:

  • Land conversion (to oilpalm plantation, industrial forest plantation (HTI),

  • rubber monoculture, transmigration area, shifting cultivation (land grabbing)),

  • (ii) Logging activities (stopped in 2000)

  • (iii) Mining (coal)


RAF60F

RAF30F

Forest

SF25F

World Agroforestry Centre


Species Density and Richness

  • Species richness and density of sapling were higher in RAF-60, while for pole was higher in shrub-30 and for tree was higher in forest.

  • RAF-13 and RAF-30 had higher density but also had lower species richness than other landcover types.

  • Low species richness was influenced by the high dominance of rubber in every rubber agroforest site.

Source: Harti Ningsih, 2008


Trees with edible parts in research sites, Bungo

Note: medicinal trees are not included)

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Beneficial trees in RAF and Forest

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(Source: Lehebel-Peron, 2008)


Similarity Index between Forest and RAF in various location in Jambi

It is shown that in lower stratum, species level grow in RAF is more similar to forest .

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Challenges of agroforestry system for food security

  • Tree based agroforestry, such as rubber agroforest, provides foods, mainly fruits, nuts and spices.

  • Trees providing carbohydrate and protein (such as bread fruit, jack fruit, candle nuts, etc.) can be enriched with enrichment planting.

  • Taungya system provides annual crops, such as upland, vegetables, spices, etc.

  • Promoting new variety of crops with light intolerant, such as paddy and soybean, that can be grown under canopy.

World Agroforestry Centre


Thank you

World Agroforestry Centre


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