Community data driven decision making in education workshop
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Community Data-Driven Decision Making in Education Workshop. Manila, May 24 – 26, 2011. Purposes of Workshop. To promote data-driven education decision making at the community level

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Community data driven decision making in education workshop

Community Data-Driven Decision Making in Education Workshop

Manila, May 24 – 26, 2011


Purposes of workshop

Purposes of Workshop

  • To promote data-driven education decision making at the community level

  • Targeted beneficiaries are school administrators, teachers, PTA representatives, community leaders, parents and students

  • Participants will be better equipped to help communities conduct evidence-based decision making in education.


Purposes of workshop1

Purposes of Workshop

  • Help shape a global workshop with your feedback and engaged participation

  • Opportunity to enhance education in other communities, too


Pay it forward

Pay it Forward!

  • Hope of workshop:

    Participants will help other educators learn and implement what you learn here


Participant introductions

Participant Introductions

  • Sit with 2 other people you don’t know (groups of 3)

  • Each person will later introduce someone else. Decide who will introduce who within your group.

  • Talk to each other, and be ready to tell the rest of the workshop participants about someone else in your group:

    1) Name

    2) Where they’re from

    3) Their position in school

    4) Their own favorite subject in school

    5) One other thing you learned about them today


Workshop agenda

Workshop Agenda

  • Themes

    Day 1 = Communicating the importance of using data

    Day 2 = Collecting and anaylzing data

    Day 3 = Using ICT to enhance teaching and learning


Workshop wiki

Workshop Wiki

philippinedataworkshop2011.wikispaces.com/


Expectations

Expectations

What do you hope to get

out of this workshop?


Anticipated results

Anticipated Results

By the end of the workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Effectively communicate with colleagues and community members about the importance of making data-driven decisions to improve education at the community level

  • Identify strengths and gaps in existing data

  • Adapt data collection tools to local needs

  • Collect needed data using an appropriate data collection method

  • Identify basic data analysis principles

  • Use ICT to collect/share data

  • Share information from the workshop and implement plans from

    the workshop with colleagues and community members


Workshop norms

Workshop Norms

  • Participatory!


The promise and perils of data

“The Promise and Perils of Data”

Questions to guide discussion:

  • What portions of this statement do you agree with, or disagree with?

  • What is your impression of other sectors (besides education) in the Philippines? Is data used in the health sector? Is it used in the justice system? Is it reliable/does it help guide decisions that benefit a community?

  • Do you think this description applies to the Education sector in the Philippines? In what ways is data already being used well?


Developmental evaluation

Developmental Evaluation

Tuesday, May 24, 2011


Why talk about evaluation

Why talk about Evaluation?

Collecting, analyzing, sharing, and making decisions/changes based on data is an evaluative process.

By the end of this session, you will be able to:

  • Be able to communicate a positive evaluation approach to colleagues and community members

  • Have identified evaluative questions you are interested in

    answering within your local school context


What is evaluation

What is Evaluation?

Monitoring is the routine tracking of program activities to help program and project managers measure progress.

  • Are we completing activities according to plan?

  • What are the costs?

    Evaluation is a specific study that helps determine program achievement. A well-planned, high-quality evaluation can help answer:

  • How well was the project implemented?

  • Were the desired changes achieved?

  • If the change was achieved, to what extent can it be attributed

    to the project?


Experience with evaluation

Experience with Evaluation

Oh no! Our school will be assessed next

month! I am being evaluated…


Value of change

Value of Change

“I keep changing what I said. Any person who is intellectually alive changes his ideas. If anyone is teaching the same thing they were teaching five years ago, either the field is dead, or they haven’t been thinking.”

-Noam Chomsky


Traditional vs developmental evaluation

Traditional vs. Developmental Evaluation

Project Begins

Project Ends


Developmental evaluation1

Developmental Evaluation

  • Developmental evaluation processes include asking evaluative questions and gathering information to provide feedback and support developmental decision-making and course corrections along the emergent path.

  • Role of a Developmental Evaluation promoter:

    • Build a team interested in making decisions, possibly changes, based on data

    • Help team ask the right evaluative questions

    • Gather/identify the right data

    • Convert that data into actionable information

    • Move ahead with decisions/change


Guiding principles

Guiding Principles

  • A dynamic process

  • From start to finish

  • Management and learning tool


Traditional vs developmental evaluation1

Traditional vs. Developmental Evaluation

Traditional Evaluation…

  • Deliver judgments of success or failure

    Developmental Evaluation…

  • Provide feedback, generate learning, support direction or affirm change in direction in real time


Traditional vs developmental evaluation2

Traditional vs. Developmental Evaluation

Traditional Evaluation…

  • Measure success against predetermined goals

    Developmental Evaluation…

  • Develop new measures and monitoring mechanisms as goals emerge & evolve


Traditional vs developmental evaluation3

Traditional vs. Developmental Evaluation

Traditional Evaluation…

  • Evaluator external, independent, objective

    Developmental Evaluation…

  • Evaluator part of a team, a facilitator and learning coach bringing evaluative thinking to the table; is supportive of the organization’s goals


Traditional vs developmental evaluation4

Traditional vs. Developmental Evaluation

Traditional Evaluation…

  • Evaluator determines the design based on the evaluator’s perspective about what is important. The evaluator controls the evaluation.

    Developmental Evaluation…

  • Evaluator partners with those engaged in the change effort to design an evaluation process that fits the organization’s mission.


Traditional vs developmental evaluation5

Traditional vs. Developmental Evaluation

Traditional Evaluation…

  • Design the evaluation based on linear cause-effect logic models

    Developmental Evaluation…

  • Design the evaluation to capture change, partnerships, and new connections


Traditional vs developmental evaluation6

Traditional vs. Developmental Evaluation

Traditional Evaluation…

  • Accountability focused on and directed to external authorities and funders.

    Developmental Evaluation…

  • Accountability centered on the innovators’ deep sense of fundamental values and commitments

    and learning.


Traditional vs developmental evaluation7

Traditional vs. Developmental Evaluation

Traditional Evaluation…

  • Evaluation causes fear of failure.

    Developmental Evaluation…

  • Evaluation supports hunger for learning.


Exercise 1 peace corps education project

Exercise 1: Peace Corps Education Project

  • Divide into 4 groups. Take the opportunity to sit with people you don’t know.

  • From a Developmental Evaluation perspective:

    How can Peace Corps staff and Filipino partners evaluate the progress of the Education Project?

     Keep in mind Developmental Evaluation principles, including data-driven decision making: What plan do you suggest for evaluating progress towards the Education Project Goal and Objectives that your group is looking at?


Peace corps education project

Peace Corps Education Project

Project Goals and Objectives

Goal 1 Students will improve their English communication and critical thinking skills through classroom instruction and co-curricular activities.

  • Objective 1Students will improve their English communication and critical thinking skills through classroom instruction and co-curricular activities.

  • Objective 2Volunteers and their Filipino counterparts will train at least 3,000 students to mentor 12,000 lower section students so that 30% will demonstrate increased competence in their English reading, writing, listening and speaking skills.

  • Objective3Between 2007 and 2012, 300 Volunteers and their Filipino counterparts will implement co-curricular activities including advising clubs and other community activities for 27,000 students, As a result 50% of the students involved in these activities will strengthen ;their skills in leadership planning, organizing activities as well as critical thinking, problem solving and decision making activities.


Peace corps education project1

Peace Corps Education Project

Goal 2 Educators will strengthen their English proficiency and teaching methods through co-planning, mentoring and teacher training.

  • Objective 1Between 2007 and 2012, 300 Volunteers and their Filipino counterparts will co-facilitate training seminars to enhance teaching methods. As a result, at least 900 Filipino teachers will be more competent in using effective teaching methods and techniques.

  • Objective 2Between 2007 and 2012, 300 Volunteers and at least 600 of their Filipino counterparts will use English only on a daily basis inside and outside of the school so that 80% will improve their English proficiency and confidence in using conversational English.

  • Objective 3Between 2007 and 2012, 300 Volunteers and their Filipino counterparts will collaborate to plan, design and implement English professional development opportunities for English and other subject teachers. As a result, over 600 Filipino teachers in the host country agencies and 12,000 other teachers will gain more competence in using English as a medium of instruction in their classes.


Peace corps education project2

Peace Corps Education Project

Goal 3 Schools and local communities will enrich their learning environment through the development and acquisition of educational resources and establishment of functional resource centers.

  • Objective 1Between 2007 and 2012, 300 Volunteers and their Filipino counterparts will collaborate in developing educational materials to enhance existing curricula and textbooks in English. As a result 1,200 teachers will use these in developing and conducting lessons in their classrooms.

  • Objective 2Volunteers and their counterparts will collaborate to acquire materials, books and didactic materials so that 100 resource centers within schools and communities will be created or improved and expanded to include more relevant materials.

  • Objective 3Volunteers and their counterparts will train at least 1’500 teachers on how to effectively use educational resources and other materials in the libraries or resource center in developing and conducting their lessons.


Peace corps education project3

Peace Corps Education Project

Goal 4 Community members and schools will collaborate on planning and implementing outreach projects, clubs and non-formal education.

  • Objective 1Volunteers and their Filipino counterparts will promote the use of the English language by establishing/strengthening clubs, adult English, and alternative learning activities for 5,000 community members. As a result 40% of the participants will gain additional skills for employment or qualifications to enable them to return to the schools.

  • Objective 2Volunteers and their counterparts will collaborate to acquire materials, books and didactic materials so that 100 resource centers within schools and communities will be created or improved and expanded to include more relevant materials.

  • Objective 3Volunteers and their counterparts, PTA, students and other community members will engage in school or community projects by conducting needs assessment, developing and implementing projects. As a result, at least 300 projects will be implemented to address school and community needs.


Exercise 2 evaluation in your school

Exercise 2: Evaluation in your School

  • Return to your school groups.

  • In your group, brainstorm the answers to the questions below from a developmental evaluation perspective:

    In your School:

    • Who wants/needs information?

    • What information do they need?

    • How often?

    • How will they use it?

    • What will it take to get it?


Convince a cynic

Convince a Cynic

Why should I participate in an evaluative process, like defining a question to be answered in my school, gathering or collecting the data, analyzing it, sharing the information, and making decisions and changes?


Stakeholders in data driven decision making

Stakeholders in Data Driven Decision Making

Tuesday, May 24, 2011


Agree strongly agree disagree strongly disagree

Agree / Strongly AgreeDisagree / Strongly Disagree

  • Uneducated people lack the intelligence to make good decisions.

  • DepEd collects quality data that is building national faith in the education system.

  • PTAs should follow the advice of schools because professional educators know what is best for students.

  • In the Philippines, leaders encourage people who are not in positions of authority to participate in decision making.


Barangay education report card berc

Barangay Education Report Card (BERC)

  • Encourages community to participate with time and resources to improving quality and access to education

  • BERC is “a set of indicators measured over time to inform community stakeholders of progress made toward goals to improve the education situation in their locality”

  • Increases awareness of community members

  • A community report card is a data collection and assessment tool, a platform for dialogue between schools and PTAs and community leaders, a planning tool, and an advocacy mechanism


Barangay education report card berc1

Barangay Education Report Card (BERC)

  • Piloted in 4 municipalities in 2010

  • Process :


The berc brainstorm challenge

The BERC Brainstorm Challenge

  • You will visit four stations around the room.

  • Your group will post one response on the wall for each station.

  • Your group will have five minutes to complete your challenge.


Behavior change

Behavior Change

Tuesday, May 24, 2011


Behavior change1

Behavior Change

  • Behavior is an action, deed

  • Change means to alter, modify, transform

    Behavior Change is the process by which individuals and/or communities modify their actions or ways.


Why didn t the fisherman change his behavior

Why didn’t the fisherman change his behavior?

He did not think he could get cancer.

(Perceived Risk)

He thought that diseases caused by smoking were not that serious.

(Perceived Consequences)

He thought that if he quit smoking, he would get cancer anyway.

(Attitude)


Why didn t the fisherman change his behavior1

Why didn’t the fisherman change his behavior?

He thought that it was too difficult to stop the habit.

(Perceived self-efficacy)

He “forgot“ that he had quit smoking.

(Access)

All of his friends smoked.

(Perceived Social Norms)

He believed that it was God’s will that he smoke and get cancer.

(Perception of Divine

Will/Culture)


Behavior change in school

Behavior Change in School

In your small group, considering either a student or the school:

1) Define the behaviour you would like them to adopt (and maintain from now on). Take some time to develop clarity on what the behaviour is, exactly.

2) What are the determinants that you believe have been keeping them from adopting this behaviour so far?

3) Brainstorm how you can communicate, using data, to help them overcome any barriers or hindrances to adopting the new behaviour.


Pre and post intervention

Pre- and Post- Intervention

“Teaching Minds, Touching Lives” Literacy Project

Tarlac College of Agriculture


Community data driven decision making in education workshop

A CHILDREN’S HOME

A COLLEGE


Community data driven decision making in education workshop

COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIP

Future teachers learning to teach and abandoned, neglected or orphaned youth learning to read.


Self efficacy and knowledge

Self Efficacy and Knowledge

“We do not have enough staff to address this issue.”

“Our staff lacks the knowledge and training to teach a complicated subject like reading.”

REALITY IN 2010: Elementary to college level residents take baseline comprehension test. 74% were below grade level.

REALITY IN 2011: Through a community partnership and focus on elementary reading, 25% of elementary residents grow 2 grade levels or more in 1 year.


Access

Access

“We can’t afford new books or teaching supplies, and the public library is too far away.”

REALITY IN 2010: Old resource room with outdated books and limited transportation to public library.

REALITY IN 2011: New resource room with books and supplies from national and international grants.


Video viewing post intervention

Essential Questions

_______

What behavior change would you like in your community?

What approach will you take to make the change a reality?

Video Viewing – Post-Intervention


2011 qualitative data

2011 Qualitative Data

Did your teaching improve as a result of your work with your RCHI resident?

36 – YES

0 - NO

“I teach. At the same time, I learn”

“… because with a lot of strategies, I improve my teaching”

“…because my student’s behavior changed, and he got good scores”


End of day 1

End of Day 1

philippinedataworkshop2011.wikispaces.com/


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