To what extent has the imposition of liberalism affected aboriginal groups in canada
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To What Extent has the imposition of liberalism affected Aboriginal groups in Canada? PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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To What Extent has the imposition of liberalism affected Aboriginal groups in Canada?. Imposition. im·po·si·tion (mp-zshn) 1. The act of imposing or the condition of being imposed. 2. Something imposed, such as a tax, an undue burden, or a fraud.

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To What Extent has the imposition of liberalism affected Aboriginal groups in Canada?

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To what extent has the imposition of liberalism affected aboriginal groups in canada

To What Extent has the imposition of liberalism affected Aboriginal groups in Canada?


Imposition

Imposition

  • im·po·si·tion (mp-zshn)

    1. The act of imposing or the condition of being imposed.

    2. Something imposed, such as a tax, an undue burden, or a fraud.

    3. A burdensome or unfair demand, as upon someone's time: listened to the telemarketer but resented the imposition.


To what extent has the imposition of liberalism affected aboriginal groups in canada

TWO ROW WAMPUM


To what extent has the imposition of liberalism affected aboriginal groups in canada

Treaty of Fort Albany between the British and the Haudenosaunee Confederacy in 1664. The people of the Mohawk nation viewed the belt in this way:

As you can see, the background of white wampum represents a river. The two parallel rows of purple wampum represent two vessels travelling upon a river. The river is large enough for the two vessels to travel together. In one vessel can be found the Kanien’kehaka (Haudenosaunee Confederacy ), and in the other vessel the European nations. Each vessel carries the laws, traditions, customs, language and spiritual beliefs of the respective nation.

It shall be the responsibility of the people in each vessel to steer a straight course. Neither Europeans nor the Kanien’kehaka shall intersect or interfere with the lives of the other. Neither side shall attempt to impose their laws, traditions, customs, language and spirituality on the people in the other vessel. Such shall be the agreement of mutual respect accorded in the Two Row Wampum.


Indian act

Indian Act

  • The Indian Act was enacted in 1876 by the Parliament of Canada under the provisions of Section 91(24) of the Constitution Act, 1867, which provides Canada's federal government exclusive authority to legislate in relation to "Indians and Lands Reserved for Indians". The Indian Act is administered by the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development.

  • The Act defines who is an "Indian" and contains certain legal rights and legal disabilities for registered Indians.

  • Assimilation…

  • Does the Indian Act live up to the spirit of the Two Row Wampum?


To what extent has the imposition of liberalism affected aboriginal groups in canada

  • “Ever since early colonial settlement, Canada’s indigenous peoples were progressively dispossessed of their lands, resources and culture, a process that led them into destitution, deprivation and dependency, which in turn generated an assertive and, occasionally, militant social movement in defence of their rights, restitution of their lands and resources and struggle for equal opportunity and self-determination.”

    • UN Commission on Human Rights 2004


To what extent has the imposition of liberalism affected aboriginal groups in canada

POTLATCH

A potlatch is a festival ceremony practiced by indigenous peoples of the Pacific Northwest Coast. This includes Haida, Nuxalk, Tlingit, Tsimshian,Nuu-chah-nulth,Kwakwaka'wakw,and Coast Salish cultures. The word comes from the Chinook Jargon, meaning "to give away" or "a gift". It is a vital part of indigenous cultures of the Pacific Northwest. Potlatching was made illegal in Canada in 1885 and the United States in the late nineteenth century, largely at the urging of missionaries and government agents who considered it "a worse than useless custom" that was seen as wasteful, unproductive which was not part of "civilized" values.

The potlatch was seen as a key target in assimilation policies and agendas. Missionary William Duncan wrote in 1875 that the potlatch was “by far the most formidable of all obstacles in the way of Indians becoming Christians, or even civilized.”


Residential schools

Residential Schools


Enfranchisement

Enfranchisement

  • Gradual Civilization Act 1857

  • Any First Nations man who gave up his official Indian status would be considered enfranchised and given 50 acres of land on the reserve for his exclusive use

  • Land Ownership

  • Only one person took advantage between 1857 and 1876…


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