Insect Defoliators of the Southeastern
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Insect Defoliators of the Southeastern United States. Forest Health Guide for Georgia Foresters Terry S. Price – Entomologist http://www.gfc.state.ga.us. Hardwood Defoliators. Greenstriped Mapleworm Orangestriped Oakworm Spiny Oakworm Buck Moth Oak Skeletonizer Forest Tent Caterpillar

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Insect Defoliators of the Southeastern United States

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Insect defoliators of the southeastern united states

Insect Defoliators of the Southeastern

United States

Forest Health Guide for Georgia Foresters

Terry S. Price – Entomologist

http://www.gfc.state.ga.us


Insect defoliators of the southeastern united states

Hardwood Defoliators

Greenstriped Mapleworm

Orangestriped Oakworm

Spiny Oakworm

Buck Moth

Oak Skeletonizer

Forest Tent Caterpillar

Eastern Tent Caterpillar

Catalpa Sphinx

Walnut Caterpillar

Variable Oakleaf Caterpillar

Gypsy Moth

Locust Leafminer

Larger Elm Leaf Beetle

Japanese Beetle

Yellow Poplar Weevil


Insect defoliators of the southeastern united states

Lepidoptera Oakworms

Oakworms in the genus Anisota, are common

throughout the South and do considerable damage in forest and landscape trees.

Common species are the orangestriped,

pinkstriped and spiny oakworms


Insect defoliators of the southeastern united states

Orange Striped Oakworm

Feed on various oaks and sometimes birch and hickory.


Insect defoliators of the southeastern united states

Spiny oakworm


Insect defoliators of the southeastern united states

The greenstriped mapleworm, prefers maples but will feed on

boxelder and oaks


Insect defoliators of the southeastern united states

Buck moth larva

The buck moth feeds primarily on oaks.


Insect defoliators of the southeastern united states

The oak skeletonizer


Insect defoliators of the southeastern united states

Oak Skeletionizer

Damage


Insect defoliators of the southeastern united states

The oak skeletonizer was responsible for extensive

defoliation of chestnut oak over a 300,000–acre area

in North Georgia from 1986 to 1999


Insect defoliators of the southeastern united states

Note key-hole shaped spots

Forest Tent Caterpillar

Forms no tent, feeds on many species


Insect defoliators of the southeastern united states

Eastern Tent caterpillar


Insect defoliators of the southeastern united states

Catalpa sphinx moth.


Insect defoliators of the southeastern united states

Feeds on walnut, butternut, pecan, hickory.

Walnut caterpillar


Insect defoliators of the southeastern united states

Variable Oak caterpillar


Insect defoliators of the southeastern united states

Coleoptera - Hardwoods

Locust leaf miner – nymph, larva and adult


Insect defoliators of the southeastern united states

The larger elm leaf beetle


Insect defoliators of the southeastern united states

The Japanese beetle


Insect defoliators of the southeastern united states

Conifer Defoliators

Spotted Loblolly Pine Sawfly

Virginia Pine Sawfly

White Pine Sawfly

Slash Pine Sawfly

Hetrick's Sawfly

Warren's Sawfly

Blackheaded Pine Sawfly

Red-Headed Pine Sawfly

Abbott's Sawfly

Introduced Pine Sawfly

Loblolly Pine Sawfly

Pine Webworm

Pine Colaspis Beetle

Pine Chafer Beetle

Evergreen Bagworm


Insect defoliators of the southeastern united states

Sawflies


Insect defoliators of the southeastern united states

Black headed sawfly


Insect defoliators of the southeastern united states

Lepidoptera - conifers

Pine webworm


Insect defoliators of the southeastern united states

Everygreen bagworm


Insect defoliators of the southeastern united states

Coleoptera (Conifers)

Pine Colaspis beetle


Insect defoliators of the southeastern united states

Pine Colaspis beetle damage


Insect defoliators of the southeastern united states

Pine Chafer Beetle


Insect defoliators of the southeastern united states

Stinging Caterpillars that occur in Southern US

Saddleback caterpillar

Saddleback caterpillar


Insect defoliators of the southeastern united states

Hag Moth Caterpillar


Insect defoliators of the southeastern united states

Puss Moth Caterpillar. Most dangerous of the

Stinging caterpillars – symptoms may last 12 hours


Insect defoliators of the southeastern united states

IO Moth Caterpillar


Insect defoliators of the southeastern united states

Stinging Rose Caterpillar


Insect defoliators of the southeastern united states

Mimicry – pretending

to be something

your not so as

to keep from being eaten.


Insect defoliators of the southeastern united states

Questions to answer for Insect Defoliators:

1) How do polyphagous, oligophagous and monophagous defoliators differ?

2) How is the presence of a defoliator detected and evaluated?

3) Describe the basic life cycle of the spruce budworm. In what part of the U.S. is this insect a problem?

4) Describe the basic life cycle of the gypsy moth. What is the potential of this insect becoming a problem in Alabama?

5) Describe the basic life cycle of the Douglas-fir tussock moth. Where is this insect a problem?

6) How do humans contribute to the spread of Gypsy Moth in the United States? What is one major difference between the Gypsy Moth and the Asian Gypsy Moth.

7) What is ‘Disparlure’ and what is its role in integrated pest management?

8) Why is damage by the Douglas-fir Tussock moth generally more serious than that caused by the Gypsy Moth?

9) Why would foliage feeding insects generally be more important in the Southern Region than in some other parts of the U.S.?

10) Why are native defoliators generally less of a problem than those introduced from other countries?


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