Section 3 15
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Section 3.15. The Disintegration and Reconstruction of France. Political and Religious Disunity. France and Germany collapsed as a result of religious turmoil. Political and Religious Disunity. France and Germany collapsed as a result of religious turmoil

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Section 3.15

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Section 3 15

Section 3.15

The Disintegration and Reconstruction of France


Political and religious disunity

Political and Religious Disunity

  • France and Germany collapsed as a result of religious turmoil


Political and religious disunity1

Political and Religious Disunity

  • France and Germany collapsed as a result of religious turmoil

  • Religious wars in France were political and religiously based


Political and religious disunity2

Political and Religious Disunity

  • France and Germany collapsed as a result of religious turmoil

  • Religious wars in France were political and religiously based

  • New form of feudal rebellion against a higher central authority


What divided france

What divided France?

  • Feudal Rights and Religious Diversity

  • Centralism vs. Localism


What divided france1

What divided France?

  • Religious Diversity

    • Catholicism official state religion (Concordat of Bologna (1516)

    • Calvinism attracted nobles (Huguenots)

      • Over 33% nobility became Calvinist

      • laws allowed lords to regulate religion in their estates

        • gave them opportunity to appoint Calvinistic preachers

    • Towns leaned toward Protestantism (bourgeois oligarchy)

    • Unskilled laboring population remained Catholic


What divided france2

What divided France?

  • Feudal Rights and Religious Diversity

  • Centralism vs. Localism

    • New Monarchies tried to centralize administration

    • Challenges to the centralization came from

      • over 300 different legal systems in 300 small regions

      • bonnes villes (good towns) stubbornly held onto their corporate rights


Civil and religious wars 1560 1600

Civil and Religious Wars 1560-1600

  • Huguenots saw opportunity to gain power over weak monarchs (Francis II (d. 1560), Charles IX (d. 1574), and Henry III (d. 1589)

  • Catherine de Medici –regent ruler

    • Perpetrated the The St. Bartholomew's Day Massacre

    • against the Huguenots in Paris for Navarre’s wedding

    • 20 thousand murdered


Civil and religious wars 1560 16001

Civil and Religious Wars 1560-1600

  • Huguenots saw opportunity to gain power over weak monarchs (Francis II (d. 1560), Charles IX (d. 1574), and Henry III (d. 1589)

  • Catherine de Medici –regent ruler

    • Perpetrated the The St. Bartholomew's Day Massacre

    • against the Huguenots in Paris for Navarre’s wedding

    • 20 thousand murdered


The politiques

The Politiques

  • Out of chaos rose third party called the Politiques

    • said that too much was being made of religion

    • What was needed was civil order

    • Had a secular rather than a religious view

    • King should overlook religious ideas if citizens obey the king


Henry bourbon of navarre

Henry Bourbon of Navarre

  • A Politique

  • Pragmatist and would use the Politique idea to gain the throne

  • Jean Bodin

    • first to discuss the modern theory of sovereignty

    • every society must have one power strong enough to give law

    • in France = absolutism

    • Sovereignty of the state emerges as the political model in the west to the present


Henry bourbon of navarre1

Henry Bourbon of Navarre

  • A Politique

  • Pragmatist and would use the Politique idea to gain the throne

  • Jean Bodin

    • first to discuss the modern theory of sovereignty

    • every society must have one power strong enough to give law

    • in France = absolutism

    • Sovereignty of the state emerges as the political model in the west to the present


End of the wars reconstruction under henry iv

End of the Wars: Reconstruction under Henry IV

  • 1589 Henry III of France and Henry of Guise are assassinated

    • next legal inheritor is Henry Bourbon (of Navarre) (Henry IV)


End of the wars reconstruction under henry iv1

End of the Wars: Reconstruction under Henry IV

  • 1589 Henry III of France and Henry of Guise are assassinated

    • next legal inheritor is Henry Bourbon (of Navarre) (Henry IV)

    • Henry of Navarre brings the Bourbon dynasty to the throne

      • a Huguenot but recognized that Catholicism was the faith of the majority

      • Converts to Catholicism in 1593

        • “Paris is well worth a mass.”


End of the wars reconstruction under henry iv2

End of the Wars: Reconstruction under Henry IV

  • Henry of Navarre brings the Bourbon dynasty to the throne

    • a Huguenot but recognized that Catholicism was the faith of the majority

    • Converts to Catholicism in 1593

      • “Paris is well worth a mass.”


End of the wars reconstruction under henry iv3

End of the Wars: Reconstruction under Henry IV

  • Issued the Edict of Nantes to quiet the Huguenots

    • Protestants’ civil rights were protected

    • Gave Protestants the rights to defend themselves and maintain private armies (had 100 fortified towns)

    • Parlements refused to recognize the Edict

    • Silenced them by granting favors to Jesuits


Section 3 15

End of the Wars: Reconstruction under Henry IV

  • Henry IV began rebuilding France:

    • “A chicken in the pot for every Frenchmen”

    • repaired roads, began rebuilding of business, ect.

      • Never summoned the estates general

      • Laid the foundations for absolutism

      • 1610: Henry IV was killed by Catholic fanatic


Cardinal richelieu

Cardinal Richelieu

  • Governments of Marie de Medici and her son Louis XIII administered by Cardinal Richelieu

  • Cardinal but really a politique


Cardinal richelieu1

Cardinal Richelieu

  • Governments of Marie de Medici and her son Louis XIII administered by Cardinal Richelieu

  • Cardinal but really a politique

  • Advanced mercantilism

  • Encouraged nobility to develop interests in commerce without loss of title or status

  • Encouraged merchants with grants of titles of nobility

  • Developed “commercial companies”


Peace of alais

Peace of Alais

  • Prohibits private warfare and orders the destruction of fortified castles not used by the king

  • Peace of Alais amends the Edict of Nantes after Protestant uprising is put down

Cardinal Richelieu at the Siege of La Rochelle.


Peace of alais1

Peace of Alais

  • Prohibits private warfare and orders the destruction of fortified castles not used by the king

  • Peace of Alais amends the Edict of Nantes after Protestant uprising is put down

  • Huguenots can not share political power, can not keep private armies

  • Huguenots can practice Protestantism

  • Path toward absolutism is being widened


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