Creative and proven ways to keep students engaged
Download
1 / 46

Creative and Proven Ways to Keep Students Engaged - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 114 Views
  • Uploaded on

Creative and Proven Ways to Keep Students Engaged. Jennifer Matthews Director, Solutions and Training Blackboard Inc. Session Objectives. Discuss why students disengage Identify online instructor roles Explore how Blackboard Learn™ can aid each role Learn something new!.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about ' Creative and Proven Ways to Keep Students Engaged' - lita


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Creative and proven ways to keep students engaged

Creative and Proven Ways to Keep Students Engaged

Jennifer Matthews

Director, Solutions and Training

Blackboard Inc.


Session objectives
Session Objectives

  • Discuss why students disengage

  • Identify online instructor roles

  • Explore how Blackboard Learn™ can aid each role

  • Learn something new!


It s a brainstorm why do students disengage
It’s a Brainstorm! – Why do students disengage?

Brainstorm Activity:Think about the question below. Turn to a neighbor, introduce yourselves and name one or two reasons.

Why do students disengageor even drop from courses, either online or face-to-face?



Guiding practices for instruction
Guiding Practices for Instruction

Chickering, Arthur & Ehrmann, Stephen C. (1996). Implementing the Seven Principles: Technology as Lever [Electronic version]. Retrieved September 8, 2005 from TLT Group http://www.tltgroup.org/programs/seven.html.


The roles we play as online instructors
The Roles We Play as Online Instructors

M

I

R

R

O

R

Five Roles I Play in Online Coursesby Scot Headley


Serving as space planner
Serving as Space Planner

“The first responsibility of online instructors is to plan their course space by using the functionality and activities of the online course to create abundant opportunities for interaction within an easily navigable interface.”

Reference: “Five Roles I Play in Online Courses,” Scot Headley


Do student feel like this
Do Student Feel Like This?

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lK1O8jQlVlY


Planning is key
Planning is Key!

Level 1:Course Menu

Level 2:Content Area

Level 3:Inside a Folder orLearning Unit/Module

Items, Files

Lesson 1

Lesson 2

Unit 1



Lesson design eclass model
Lesson Design – eCLASS Model

  • E = Explain

  • C = Clarify

  • L = Look

  • A = Act

  • S = Share

  • S = Self Evaluate/Submit

    Source:Creating a Guide to Online Course Development For Distance Learning Faculty

    Dr. Steven M. Gerson, English Professor, Johnson County CChttp://www.westga.edu/~distance/ojdla/winter34/gerson34.html



The roles we play as online instructors1
The Roles We Play as Online Instructors

M

I

R

R

O

R

Five Roles I Play in Online Coursesby Scot Headley


Serving as host
Serving as Host

“In the host role, online instructors draw students into the experience of online learning and respond to student needs and concerns with a patient, welcoming, attentive attitude.”

Reference: “Five Roles I Play in Online Courses,” Scot Headley


The roles we play as online instructors2
The Roles We Play as Online Instructors

M

I

R

R

O

R

Five Roles I Play in Online Coursesby Scot Headley



Keep out the welcome mat
Keep Out the Welcome Mat

  • Publish near the beginning

  • Publish before mid-term

  • Publish near close

  • Publish at close of course


Orientation options
Orientation Options

  • Face-to-Face Orientation in Lab Setting

  • Unit in Online Course

    • Scavenger Hunt

    • Ice Breaker Activity with Discussion Board

    • Practice submitting assignments/taking test

  • Email

    • Pre-Course Greeting

    • How to log on/how to contact you

  • Links to student tutorials

  • Contact information for help desk

  • Dynamic FAQ



Serving as pace setter
Serving as Pace Setter

“Satisfactory experiences for the instructor and student in an Internet-based course require the recognition that the preparation, activities, and commitments are a bit different than those of face-to-face courses.”

Reference: “Five Roles I Play in Online Courses,” Scot Headley


Exemplary design rubric highlights
Exemplary Design Rubric Highlights

  • Content is presented in manageable segments

    • Align with syllabus/course outline/text

  • Content is made available via a variety of appropriate mechanisms

    • Incorporate folders, learning modules/units, external lists

  • Course design encourages critical reflection and analysis of content

    • Use a variety of text and multimedia, inspire student inquiry


Exemplary course case study
Exemplary Course Case Study

  • Institution: Kamehameha Schools

  • Course Title: Hawaiian Culture


Individualize with adaptive release
Individualize with Adaptive Release

  • Ability for an instructor to create custom learning paths through a course

  • Promotes differentiated instruction

  • Content items, discussions, assessments, assignments, or other activities can be released to students based on a set of criteria including:

    • Date / time

    • Username

    • Group membership

    • Grade on a test

    • Assignment grade

    • Review of another piece of content


Use cases
Use Cases

  • Individualization

    • Target multiple skill levels with remediation/enrichment materials

    • Assign different group projects

  • Keep the Cohort together

    • Block advancement

  • Make-up Assignments/Assessments

    • Reveal Content as Needed




The roles we play as online instructors3
The Roles We Play as Online Instructors

M

I

R

R

O

R

Five Roles I Play in Online Coursesby Scot Headley


Serving as a connector
Serving as a Connector

"My connector role requires me to help participants make connections with each other, with the course content, and between their work in the course and their work outside the course space.”

Reference: “Five Roles I Play in Online Courses,” Scot Headley


Build connections among students
Build Connections Among Students

  • Personal Reflections (Journal/Blogs)

  • Student “Teachers” (Discussion Leaders)

  • ‘Networking’ Discussions

  • Students Helping One Another (FAQ/Study Groups)

  • Group Activities




graphic

Sub

header

white space

chart


Alternative assessment approaches
Alternative Assessment Approaches

  • Individualized Projects

  • Brief self-tests

  • Portfolios and collections

  • Designs and drawings

  • Original plays, stories, dances, poetry

  • Graded discussion questions

  • Self and peer review activities

  • Reflective journals, blogs

  • One minute papers

  • Contributions to digital archives

  • Case studies

  • Lab experiments

  • Web pages


Blackboard learn question types
Blackboard Learn - Question Types

  • Calculated Formula

  • Calculated Numeric

  • Either/Or

  • File Response

  • Fill in Multiple Blanks

  • Hotspot

  • Jumbled Sentence

  • Opinion Scale/Likert

  • Quiz Bowl

  • Short Answer

Advanced Question Types

Basic Question Types

  • Matching

  • Multiple Answer

  • Multiple Choice

  • Ordering

  • True/False

  • Essay

  • Fill in the Blank



The roles we play as online instructors4
The Roles We Play as Online Instructors

M

I

R

R

O

R

Five Roles I Play in Online Coursesby Scot Headley


Serving as mirror
Serving as Mirror

“My personal goals within this role are to help individuals have an external guide to their mastery of the course content, to inform individuals of their level of success in fulfilling community commitments, and to encourage and challenge the group as a whole.”

Reference: “Five Roles I Play in Online Courses,” Scot Headley


Role Model

People reallydofollow the leader


Serving as a mirror
Serving as a Mirror

  • Quizzes as Learning Tools

  • Timely Feedback

    • Rubrics

    • Grade Center/Gradebook

    • Messages/Email

    • Chat

    • And don’t forget the phone!

  • Opportunities for Feedback to us!


Student centered learning assessment features

New features include:

Handling multiple attempts of quizzes, tests and surveys

Support for extra credit questions

More granular feedback options

Export, Store, Import

Students will benefit from:

A true self-assessment option

Student-Centered Learning Assessment Features




The roles we play as online instructors5
The Roles We Play as Online Instructors

M

I

R

R

O

R

Role Model, Timely Feedback, Alternative Assessments

Five Roles I Play in Online Coursesby Scot Headley


Guiding practices for instruction1
Guiding Practices for Instruction

Chickering, Arthur & Ehrmann, Stephen C. (1996). Implementing the Seven Principles: Technology as Lever [Electronic version]. Retrieved September 8, 2005 from TLT Group http://www.tltgroup.org/programs/seven.html.


Session objectives1
Session Objectives

  • Discuss disengagement

  • Identify online Instructor Roles

  • Explore how Blackboard Learn can aid each role

  • Learn something new!


Thank you

Thank You!

Questions?


ad