Satellite observations for future space weather forescasting
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 21

Satellite Observations for Future Space Weather Forescasting PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 96 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Satellite Observations for Future Space Weather Forescasting. Howard J. Singer, NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center Space Weather Workshop Boulder, CO May 2, 2008. Acknowledgments: Bonadonna, Donovan, Fuller-Rowell, Green, Hill, Kunches, Maus, Onsager, Viereck.

Download Presentation

Satellite Observations for Future Space Weather Forescasting

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Satellite observations for future space weather forescasting

Satellite Observations for Future Space Weather Forescasting

Howard J. Singer, NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center

Space Weather Workshop

Boulder, CO

May 2, 2008

Acknowledgments: Bonadonna, Donovan, Fuller-Rowell, Green, Hill, Kunches, Maus, Onsager, Viereck


Satellite observations for future space weather forescasting1

Satellite Observations for Future Space Weather Forescasting

Presentation Outline:

  • Introduction to space weather observations

  • NOAA satellite programs: GOES, POES, NPOES, Solar Wind Monitoring

  • Collaborating with the Space Weather and Space Science community

  • The Future

GOES 8-12

GOES NOP

ACE

STEREO

CORS - GPS

POES

SOHO

And More…

Satellite Observations for Future Space Weather Forecasting


Space weather observations

Space Weather Observations

Space Weather observations extend from the Sun to interplanetary space, to the magnetosphere and ionosphere/upper atmosphere.

Space Weather observations support a growing and diverse user community:

  • DoD, NASA, FAA, Industry, Commercial

    Service Providers, International …

Space Weather observations are used:

  • to specify and forecast the environment

  • in models (drive, assimilate, and validate)

  • for research

Satellite Observations for Future Space Weather Forecasting


Satellite observations for future space weather forescasting

Monitor, Measure and Specify:Data for Today’s Space Weather

NASA STEREO

(Ahead)

  • Ground Sites

    • Magnetometers (NOAA/USGS)

    • Thule Riometer and Neutron

    • monitor (USAF)

    • SOON Sites (USAF)

    • RSTN (USAF)

    • Telescopes and Magnetographs

    • Ionosondes (AF, ISES, …)

    • GPS (CORS)

  • SOHO (ESA/NASA)

    • Solar EUV Images

    • Solar Corona (CMEs)

ESA/NASASOHO

  • ACE (NASA)

    • Solar wind speed, density, temperature and energetic particles

    • Vector Magnetic field

L1

NASAACE

NOAA GOES

NOAA POES

  • GOES (NOAA)

    • Energetic Particles

    • Magnetic Field

    • Solar X-ray Flux

    • Solar EUV Flux

    • Solar X-Ray Images

  • STEREO (NASA)

    • Solar Corona

    • Solar EUV Images

    • Solar wind

    • Vector Magnetic field

  • POES (NOAA)

    • High Energy Particles

    • Total Energy Deposition

    • Solar UV Flux

NASA STEREO

(Behind)

Satellite Observations for Future Space Weather Forecasting


Satellite observations for future space weather forescasting

GOES: NOAA’s Geostationary Operational

Environmental Satellite

GOES 8 (Launch: 4/13/94, EOL orbit raising 5/5/04)

GOES 9 (Launch: 5/23/95, loaned to Japan, EOL 6/14/07)

(Launch: 4/25/97, South America Coverage)

GOES 11 (Launch: 5/13/00, Operational)

GOES 12 (Launch: 7/23/01, Operational)

GOES 10

Space Environment Monitor (SEM) Instrumentation GOES 8-12

Energetic Particle Sensor (EPS)

Monitors the energetic electron, proton, and

alpha particle fluxes

e: 0.6 to 4.0 MeV, p: 0.7 to 700 MeV, a: 4 to 3400 MeV

Magnetometer (MAG)

Monitors the vector magnetic field

0.512 second samples, ~0.1 nT sensitivity, +/- 1000 nT

X-Ray Sensor (XRS)

Monitors whole-Sun x-ray brightness in two bands

1 - 8 Angstroms and 0.5 - 4 Angstroms

Solar X-ray Imager (SXI) – first on GOES 12

One - minute cadence, full disk, 5 arc sec pixels,

0.6 – 6 nm, 512 x 512 pixel array

SXI: A NOAA-USAF-NASA partnership

AF Funded

Satellite Observations for Future Space Weather Forecasting


Satellite observations for future space weather forescasting

GOES: NOAA’s Geostationary Operational

Environmental Satellite

Space Environment Monitor (SEM) Instrumentation GOES 8-12

Current Instrument Issues:

Energetic Particle Sensor (EPS)

GOES 12: Two proton channels not usable

Using GOES 11 and GOES 10

All other particle sensors functioning on GOES 10,

11, and 12

Magnetometer (MAG)

  • Functioning on GOES 10, 11, and 12

    X-Ray Sensor (XRS)

    X-ray Positioner failed on GOES 11 and 12

    Using GOES 10

    Solar X-ray Imager (SXI) – first on GOES 12

    No longer functioning

Current Spacecraft Status:

GOES 11 (west) and GOES 12 (east): operatonal

GOES 10 over South America:

SWPC using XRS and Protons

Satellite inclination increasing

GOES 8-12

Satellite Observations for Future Space Weather Forecasting


Goes nop sem enhancement summary

GOES NOP:SEM Enhancement Summary

  • GOES 13 Launch May 24, 2006

  • First of New Generation

  • Magnetometer (MAG)

    • Two instruments operating simultaneously

  • Energetic Particle Sensors (EPS)

    • Lower energy electron (30 keV) and proton (80 keV) bands

    • More look-directions

  • X-Ray Sensor (XRS) (Limited functionality)

    • Eliminate electronic range-changing

  • EUV Sensor (EUVS)

    • New instrument, five wavelength bands 10 - 125 nm

  • Solar X-Ray Imager (SXI)

    • Improved sensitivity and resolution

    • Autonomous event response

GOES O planned launch Nov 5, 2008

Satellite Observations for Future Space Weather Forecasting


Space weather instrumentation on goes r launch fy 2015

Space Weather Instrumentation on GOES-R (Launch FY 2015)

  • Space Environment In-Situ Suite (SEISS)

    • Monitors solar, galactic and in situ electron, proton, and alpha particle fluxes

    • Medium energy electrons and protons begin on GOES 13

    • Low energy electrons and protons begin on GOES-R

    • Heavy Ions begin on GOES-R

    • Implementation phase (Contractor: Assurance Technology Corporation)

  • Magnetometer (MAG)

    • Monitors Earth’s time-varying vector magnetic field

    • Included in spacecraft procurement

  • Extreme Ultraviolet and X-ray Irradiance Suite (EXIS)

    • X-Ray Sensor (XRS) monitors whole-Sun X-ray irradiance in two bands

    • EUV Sensor (EUVS) monitors whole-Sun EUV irradiance in spectral bands - improved for GOES R

    • Implementation phase (Contractor: Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP))

  • Solar Ultraviolet Imager (SUVI)

    • Solar X-ray Imager (SXI) monitors solar flares, coronal holes, active regions-first GOES 12

    • New spectral bands for GOES R

    • Implementation phase (Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center)

Satellite Observations for Future Space Weather Forecasting


Satellite observations for future space weather forescasting

NOAA Polar Operational

Environmental Satellites (POES)

  • Operating Parameters

    Polar orbit at 850 km altitude (90 minute orbital period)

    AM and PM orbits to provide complete coverage

  • Operational Satellites

    NOAA15 (working SEM, no SBUV)

    NOAA16 (working SEM, working SBUV)

    NOAA17 (working SEM, working SBUV)

    NOAA18 (working SEM, working SBUV)

  • Future NOAA POES Satellites

    NOAA-N’ (2009)

  • Future (NPOESS)

    Collaboration with DOD and NASA

    Collaboration with Europeans (METOP)

    Replaces POES, DMSP

    First NPOESS with space weather ~ 2013

  • Collaborative Polar Satellites

    METOP-1 (2006)European Collaboration

    METOP-2 (2011)European Collaboration

POES SEM: Measurements of energetic particle energy deposition in upper atmosphere and solar irradiance to provide data of practical benefit to commercial and government activities and for extensive research.

Satellite Observations for Future Space Weather Forecasting


Satellite observations for future space weather forescasting

NPOESS Space Environmental Data Capabilities

2007: OFCM working with OSTP to assess N-M impact to national space environmental services.

2008: OSTP will determine if a Phase II Assessment of alternatives and Strategies is warranted to mitigate reduced NPOESS SESS capabilities

Satellite Observations for Future Space Weather Forecasting

Bonadonna AMS 08


Satellite observations for future space weather forescasting

Uses of Space Weather Data:Magnetometer Data Needed for Space Weather Model Validation

The geosynchronous magnetic field is used to validate models and eventually may be assimilated into models. It will be vital for models run in operations.

CISM: Huang et al.

U. Mich. Gombosi et al.

U. Of Michigan (Gombosi et al.)

Multiple groups of MHD modelers rely on the GOES magnetic field data for validating their models.

UNH: Raeder et al.

Satellite Observations for Future Space Weather Forecasting


Satellite observations for future space weather forescasting

Solar Observations: Irradiance (EXIS)

  • Extreme Ultraviolet and X-ray Irradiance Suite

EUV Sensor (EUVS)

Measures the solar EUV energy input to the upper atmosphere and improves the ability to predict upper atmospheric and ionospheric conditions.

X-Ray Sensor (XRS)

Monitors whole-Sun X-ray irradiance in two bands and drives the Radio Blackout portion of NOAA’s Space Weather Scales.

Satellite Observations for Future Space Weather Forecasting


Satellite observations for future space weather forescasting

High-Latitude D-Region HF Radio Absorption

  • One-stop shopping for HF fade anywhere on the planet

  • New product to combine polar and low latitude HF absorption

  • Deployment as a tool later this year

Satellite Observations for Future Space Weather Forecasting


Satellite observations for future space weather forescasting

In Situ Observations: Particles (SEISS)Space Environment In Situ Suite

The SEISS is an ensemble of electron, proton, and heavy ion detecting telescopes. SEISS data drives Solar Radiation Storm portion of NOAA’s Space Weather Scales.

CRRES Electron Radiation Model

AF-Geospace, Courtesy of Greg Ginet, AFRL

SEISS products serve user communities in the airline industry, the satellite industry, and manned space flight operations.

Satellite Observations for Future Space Weather Forecasting


Satellite observations for future space weather forescasting

Solar Observations: Imaging(SUVI) Solar Ultraviolet Imager

GOES-12 SXI color composite.

SUVI will image the same portions of the Sun’s atmosphere as SXI, but in different spectral bands that provide better access to temperature and density.

SUVI will locate coronal holes, flares, and coronal mass ejection source regions. It will also detect “Over the horizon” active regions and observe active region complexity. Together, these observations support all space weather customers.

Simulated GOES-R SUVI color composite (SOHO EIT data, a joint NASA/ESA research program).

Satellite Observations for Future Space Weather Forecasting


Utilizing non noaa observations and data

Utilizing Non-NOAA Observations and Data

  • By continued awareness of, and involvement in research programs, SWPC can encourage and work together with non-NOAA satellite programs to provide data for operational use.

  • ACE: Through an interagency partnership, NASA modified the ACE spacecraft to provide continuous real-time data.

  • IMAGE: Through an interagency partnership, NASA modified the IMAGE spacecraft to provide continuous real-time data.

  • Living With A Star: Through involvement on NASA definition panels, SWPC has encouraged NASA to define satellite programs that include utility to space weather forecasting and specification (Solar Dynamics Observatory, RBSP, …)

  • STEREO:Through interagency planning, NOAA is obtaining real-time data from a satellite beacon that is being used by operations for forecasts and warnings of impending geomagnetic storms.

Satellite Observations for Future Space Weather Forecasting


Satellite observations for future space weather forescasting

Examples of Future Satellite Programs That Can Contribute to Space Weather

COMMUNICATION/NAVIGATION OUTAGE FORECASTING SYSTEM (C/NOFS) 2008 AF/NASA

S0LAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY 2008 NASA

RADIATION BELT STORM PROBES 2012 NASA

SWARM 2010 ESA

Satellite Observations for Future Space Weather Forecasting


The future

The Future

  • Observations and Predictive

  • Capabilities Enable

  • Space Exploration

  • Space Shuttle, Space Station

    and extravehicular activities

  • Cislunar and lunar orbits and

    lunar surface operations

  • Mars

Space Radiation Hazards and the Vision for Space Exploration

National Research Council Report 2006

Satellite Observations for Future Space Weather Forecasting


Satellite observations for future space weather forescasting

Ground-based Observations Contribute to Space Weather Forecasting

Canadian All-Sky Imagers and Magnetometers are a ground-component of the NASA THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions During Substorms) Mission.

Locations of Ground Stations and the GOES Field-line Intercept

GOES 12

GOES 11

Good ground-based coverage will foster conjugate studies with GOES .

Movie

Donovan, U. of Calgary

Satellite Observations for Future Space Weather Forecasting


Conclusions

Conclusions

  • Space weather forecasting requires observations, but also modeling and scientific understanding.

  • NOAA assets in space include GOES and POES, efforts to provide a new solar wind monitor, and partnerships with NASA for ACE, STEREO, …

  • We have valuable partnerships with other agencies, and national and international organizations for using non-NOAA space-based observations as tools to improve space weather services, and as prototypes for possible future operational observations.

  • New observations and new priorities are guided by new challenges and customer needs.

Satellite Observations for Future Space Weather Forecasting


Satellite observations for future space weather forescasting

  • Contact Information:

  • Howard J. Singer, Chief Scientist

  • NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center

  • 325 Broadway

  • Boulder, CO 80305

  • 303 497 6959

  • [email protected]

Satellite Observations for Future Space Weather Forecasting


  • Login