Scholarly activity curriculum development and student involvement
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Scholarly activity, curriculum development and student involvement. Mick Healey, Alan Jenkins and John Lea. 24 June 2014. Scholarly activity, curriculum development and student involvement. Aim - To review the contribution of CBHE in the development of research-based learning

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Scholarly activity curriculum development and student involvement

Scholarly activity, curriculum development and student involvement

  • Mick Healey, Alan Jenkins and John Lea

  • 24 June 2014


Scholarly activity curriculum development and student involvement1

Scholarly activity, curriculum development and student involvement

Aim - To review the contribution of CBHE in the development of research-based learning

Collected - Over 50 mini-case studies from UK, Australia, Canada, Ireland, Netherlands, New Zealand and United States


Core principle

Core principle

“All undergraduate students in all higher education institutions should experience learning through, and about, research and inquiry. …

We argue, as does much recent US experience, that such curricular experience should and can be mainstreamed for all or many students through a research-active curriculum. We argue that this can be achieved through structured interventions at course team, departmental, institutional and national levels.”

(Healey and Jenkins, 2009, 3).


Scholarly activity curriculum development and student involvement2

Scholarly activity, curriculum development and student involvement

New models of curriculum … should all … incorporate research-based study for undergraduates(Ramsden 2008, 10-11).

A positive research and teaching link primarily depends on the nature of the students’ learning experiences, resulting from appropriate teaching and learning processes, rather than on particular inputs or outcomes (Elton 2001, 43).


Scholarly activity curriculum development and student involvement3

Scholarly activity, curriculum development and student involvement

For the students who are the professionals of the future, developing the ability to investigate problems, make judgments on the basis of sound evidence, take decisions on a rational basis, and understand what they are doing and why is vital. Research and inquiry is not just for those who choose to pursue an academic career. It is central to professional life in the twenty-first century. (Brew 2007, p. 7)


Spot the college

Spot the College

Which of the following do you think refer to practices in:

a) CBHE/HE in FE; and b) universities?

Biotechnology students work as part of a research team

Psychology students research students’ quality of life

Engaging students in applied research through a community sports development consultancy project

Student-led research journal in business

Using undergraduates to evaluate student experiences of teaching and learning

How research will change engineering artefacts

Engaging students with the latest research and publications


Spot the college1

Spot the College

Biotechnology students work as part of a research team – Massachusetts Bay Community College

Psychology students research students’ quality of life – York St John University

Engaging students in applied research through a community sports development consultancy project - University of Central Lancashire

Student-led research journal in business – Newcastle College

Using undergraduates to evaluate student experiences of teaching and learning – Warwick University

How research will change engineering artefacts – Imperial College London

Engaging students with the latest research and publications - Adam Smith College and Dundee College


Scholarly activity curriculum development and student involvement

p19

STUDENTS ARE PARTICIPANTS

Research-based

Research-tutored

Undertaking research and inquiry

Engaging in research discussions

EMPHASIS ON RESEARCHPROCESSES AND PROBLEMS

EMPHASIS ON RESEARCH CONTENT

Learning about current research in the discipline

Developing research and inquiry skills and techniques

Research-led

Research-oriented

STUDENTS FREQUENTLY ARE AN AUDIENCE

Curriculum design and the research-teaching nexus

(based on Healey, 2005, 70)


Scholarly activity curriculum development and student involvement

Students as partners in learning and teaching in higher education

Source: Healey, Flint and Harrington (2014)


Uk review of literature

UK review of literature

In the UK there is a lively debate in academic literature about STAFF scholarly activity in HE in FE

There is also a lively debate about the possible hybrid nature of the pedagogical context, i.e. it borrows from its proximity to wider FE and HE contexts

There is also a lively debate about the influence of the wider mission of FECs to be engines of economic growth, and of the effect of their corporate/managerial ethos on HE provision

Are there positive lessons to be learnt from this context?


International context

International context

In the UK there are currently almost 300 FECs running HE courses; representing 10% of total HE provision; with over 100,000 FTE student numbers; some colleges have over 3,000 FTE students

In the USA it is estimated that nearly half the country’s undergraduates (around 12 million students) are studying in community colleges, and around 25% of those will subsequently transfer to four-year schools

In Australia there are around 175 HE providers, but only 40 are designated universities. The rest of HE is provided in colleges with a growing provision in publicly funded institutes of vocational education (TAFEs)

Should we rally against these developments, or embrace them?


Some key questions

Some key questions

What is implied by arguing that we need to enhance the scholarship of staff in CBHE contexts?

Are colleges helping us all to widen notions of scholarship in HE?

Could student scholarly activity be considered a key impact measure?


Cbhe line up

CBHE Line-up

I want you to position yourself on a line according to the extent to which you agree or disagree with the following statements

Talk to the person next to you about why you have positioned yourself where you have and as a consequence you may need to ‘move’


Cbhe line up1

CBHE Line-up

“To enhance the quality of learning in CBHE it is more important to focus on engaging students in research and inquiry than raising the research expertise of staff.”

Strongly ----------------------------- Strongly

agree disagree


Boyer context for cbhe

Boyer context for CBHE

p52


Examples of ways in which learners may engage with boyer s four scholarships

Examples of ways in which learners may engage with Boyer’s four scholarships


Strategies for engaging students at the beginning of their courses

Strategies for engaging students at the beginning of their courses

In pairs, each skim read at least ONE different year one case study (3.1 – 3.8 pp 22-27).

Discuss whether and how any of the ideas may be amended for application in your contexts.

5 minutes


Scholarly activity curriculum development and student involvement

Strategies for course teams to introduce year one students into research and Strategies to introduce year 1 students into research and knowledge complexity

  • Create a strong opening activity that involves students doing guided research

  • Help students to read academic literature critically

  • Involve library and other learning support staff

  • Demonstrate how research mindedness can support future employability

  • Guide students into the nature of research in their discipline(s)

  • Provide opportunities for students to make their research public

  • Recognise that students will find such work challenging

  • Ensure how the students are assessed supports research mindedness

  • Involve upper level students in supporting student research in year one


Course and programme strategies for engaging students with research inquiry

Course and programme strategies for engaging students with research & inquiry

Strategy one – develop students’ understanding of the role of research and inquiry in their discipline

Strategy two – develop students’ abilities to carry out research

Strategy three – progressively develop students’ understanding

Strategy four – manage students’ experience of research


Scholarly activity curriculum development and student involvement

Developing and enhancing undergraduate final-year projects and dissertations

http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/projects/detail/ntfs/ntfsproject_Gloucestershire10


Course team departmental and institutional strategies

Course team, departmental and institutional strategies

In a different pair, each skim read at least ONE different case study (5.1 – 5.12 pp 41-49).

Discuss whether and how any of the ideas may be amended for application in your contexts.

5 minutes


S trategies to increase the skills of staff to support student inquiry

Strategies to increase the skills of staff to support student inquiry

  • Celebrate and share what is already in place

  • Create opportunities for staff and students to experiment

  • Review and enhance what is in place

  • Ensure initial training in teaching and subsequent CPD includes an emphasis on supporting student inquiry

  • Require and support all programmes to be redesigned

  • Reshape the timetable structure

  • Create alternative learning spaces


Conclusion 1 a cbhe contribution to higher education

Conclusion 1: A CBHE contribution to higher education?

“The relationship between teacher and learner is …completely different in higher education from what it is in schools. At the higher level, the teacher is not there for the sake of the student, both have their justification in the service of scholarship” (von Humboldt 1810)

“It [a university] is a place of teaching universal knowledge. This implies that its object is, on the one hand, intellectual, not moral, and, on the other, that it is the diffusion and extension of knowledge rather than the advancement. If its object were scientific and philosophical discovery, I do not see why a University should have students…” (Newman 1854)

“What we urgently need today is a more inclusive view of what it means to be a scholar – a recognition that knowledge is acquired through research, through synthesis, through practice, and through teaching. We acknowledge that these four categories – the scholarship of discovery, of integration, of application, and of teaching – divide intellectual functions that are tied inseparably to each other” (Boyer 1990)


Conclusion 2 some implications

Conclusion 2: Some implications?

  • There are many similarities in the different ways in which CBHE and universities engage their undergraduate students in research and inquiry although there are subtle differences in the amount and level of their involvement.

  • We found strong evidence of colleges engaging students in research and scholarly activity at curriculum level, but little evidence of this being embedded at institutional level.

  • What implications might these conclusions have?


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