Front range cflrp 2011 social and economic monitoring results
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Front Range CFLRP 2011 Social and Economic Monitoring Results. November 14, 2012 Kathie Mattor, Kawa Ng, Julie Schaefers , Tony Cheng, and Carrie Tremblatt. Outline. Overview of social and economic monitoring goals and indicators Findings Economic impacts Wood utilization Collaboration

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Front Range CFLRP 2011 Social and Economic Monitoring Results

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Front range cflrp 2011 social and economic monitoring results

Front Range CFLRP2011 Social and Economic Monitoring Results

November 14, 2012

Kathie Mattor, Kawa Ng, Julie Schaefers, Tony Cheng, and Carrie Tremblatt


Outline

Outline

  • Overview of social and economic monitoring goals and indicators

  • Findings

    • Economic impacts

    • Wood utilization

    • Collaboration

    • Public perceptions

  • Conclusions

  • Proposed Monitoring & Outreach Recommendations

  • Discussion


2011 social economic monitoring goals

2011 Social & Economic Monitoring Goals

  • Determine the economic contributions associated with the FR-CFLRP funded task orders

  • Measure types and amounts of wood utilization

  • Determine public acceptance for increased pace and scale of forest management

  • Identify levels of collaboration


Measuring economic impacts

Measuring Economic Impacts

Goal: Determine the economic contributions associated with the FR-CFLRP funded task orders

Indicators:

  • Labor income & value-added economic impacts

  • Employment generated by the project

  • Location of employees and sub-contractors

    Methods:

  • Input-output modeling of pertinent operational expenditure and labor information obtained from the contractor

  • “Front Range Model” project-level monitoring differs from national reporting using TREAT model


Fr cflrp 2011 economic impacts

FR CFLRP 2011 Economic Impacts

  • Total of 6 task orders initiated: 3 fulfilled, 3 partially completed

  • $1.8 million in labor income (2010 US)

  • $1.6 million in GDP to the local economy (2010 US)


Fr cflrp 2011 economic impacts1

FR CFLRP 2011 Economic Impacts

  • Total of 38 full- and part-time jobs estimated

  • All company employees reside within CO

  • Contractor was responsible for 70% of the total number of hours billed

    • all mechanical work being completed by the contractor

    • majority of the manual work (92%) completed by out-of-state subcontractors


Measuring wood utilization

Measuring Wood Utilization

Goal: Measure types and amounts of wood utilization

Indicators:

  • Amount of mechanical and manual work

  • Location of businesses purchasing materials

  • Amount and type of materials generated

  • Types and relative value of products created from these materials

    Methods:

  • Statistical analysis of data obtained from contractor


Fr cflrp 2011 wood utilization

FR CFLRP 2011 Wood Utilization

  • 3,170 acres were treated under the FR-CFLR project in 2011

    • 1,468 acres treated on the Pike-San Isabel

      • 93% through mechanical treatments

    • 1,592 acres treated on the Arapaho-Roosevelt

      • 75% through manual treatments

  • 99% mechanical treatment materials available for value-added uses but none of manual treatment


Fr cflrp 2011 wood utilization1

FR CFLRP 2011 Wood Utilization

  • All CFLR value-added materials purchased by 12 Colorado businesses in 2011

    • Purchased sawtimber, blue stain wood, small diameter timber, products other than logs, limbs and brush, and bark fines

    • Created pallets and crates, landscaping material, dimensional lumber, firewood, and wood fuel pellets


Measuring public perceptions

Measuring Public Perceptions

Goal: Determine public acceptance of forest treatments

Indicators:

  • Acceptance of prescribed fire and/or other mechanical treatments

  • Perceived benefits or issues of restoration activities (pace and scale)

  • Public attitudes toward the project and collaborators

    Methods:

  • Literature review focused on research (across U.S.) pertaining to public acceptance of prescribed fire


2011 findings public perceptions

2011 Findings – Public Perceptions

  • By understanding public perceptions towards forest management the FRR will be better equipped to effectively collaborate with local stakeholders

  • Existing research identifies general support for the use of prescribed fires in forest management


2011 findings public perceptions1

2011 Findings – Public Perceptions

Key concerns

  • Escaped catastrophic fire

  • Harm to wildlife and fish habitat

  • Poor air quality

  • Impacts on aesthetics

    Factors influencing public perceptions:

  • Contextual and location based factors

  • Beliefs and attitudes

  • Knowledge and experience

    Effective outreach methods

  • Positive message framing and interactive methods are generally more successful in building trust and acceptance

  • As public learns more they tend to become more tolerant of the use of prescribed fire


Measuring collaboration

Measuring Collaboration

Goal: Identify Levels of Collaboration

Indicators:

  • Levels of collaboration, communication, and group learning

  • Extent stakeholders previously in conflict are working together

  • Fairness, transparency and timeliness of information sharing among all participants

    Methods:

  • Based on case study CFRI conducted

  • Interviews with 15 FRR members


Collaboration achievements

Collaboration - Achievements

  • Diverse representation of interests in the larger FRR and the CFLR science and monitoring team

  • The FR-CFLR project has had a positive effect on relations among members, as well as relations between the FRR and other organizations

  • There are relatively high levels of trust and strong commitment to work toward agreement on important decisions related to the project

  • Most partners agreed the collaborative was having an influence on the current implementation of the FRCFLR project by providing feedback and additional resources, and helping to shape future FR-CFLRP forest treatments


Collaboration challenges

Collaboration - Challenges

  • Several members identified missing interests and/or groups unable to fully participate

    • currently being addressed by reaching out to missing interests

  • Many members of the FRR expressed they did not have a clear sense of their roles or responsibilities.

    • Attributed to not having a defined process for how the FRR collaborative communicates recommendations for the CFLRP by the USFS

    • Currently being addressed through the development of the adaptive management process

  • Some members felt the FRR collaborative had little influence on the implementation of current projects (they were NEPA-ready prior to the FRR’s involvement), but were optimistic of the FRR involvement in future CFLRP projects

  • Regardless of these challenges, members were optimistic about the collaborative effort and regard the FR-CFLRP as a significant opportunity to achieve common objectives across diverse interests


Conclusions

Conclusions

Economic Contributions

  • The FR-CFLRP is contributing to the local economy through labor, expenditures, and wood utilization

    Wood Utilization

  • Mixture of treatments provided affects the availability of value-added materials;

  • All value-added materials associated with the 2011 FR-CFLRP task orders went to CO businesses

    Public Perceptions

  • Recommend developing and implementing public outreach plan

    Collaboration

  • There have been high levels of collaboration throughout the development and implementation of the FR-CFLRP


Future social economic monitoring

Future Social & Economic Monitoring

Economic

  • Collect and analyze additional job information

  • Collect and analyze leveraged funds data

    Wood utilization

  • Collect additional information to better calculate the economic effects of wood utilization

    Public Perceptions

  • Identify perceptions specific to FR-CFLR region

  • Consult literature on perceptions toward other forest management tools

    Collaboration

  • Continue to track the challenges, achievements, and lessons learned associated with the collaborative process

  • Limit data collection to every 3-5 years, using these findings as a baseline


Discussion

Discussion

Recommendations of the LR monitoring team to the Front Range Roundtable?

  • Conclusions and recommendations to meet goals?

  • Future monitoring recommendations?


Thank you

Thank you!

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]


Discussion1

Discussion

Recommendations of the LR monitoring team to the Front Range Roundtable?

  • Conclusions and recommendations to meet goals?

  • Future monitoring recommendations?


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