Plagiarism
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Plagiarism. RBK International Academy. Plagiarism. 10/20/2014. Plagiarism Contd….

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Plagiarism

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Plagiarism

Plagiarism

RBK International Academy


Plagiarism1

Plagiarism

10/20/2014


Plagiarism contd

Plagiarism Contd…

Plagiarism is the unauthorized use or close imitation of the language and thoughts of another author and the representation of them as one's own original work. Within academia, plagiarism by students, professors, or researchers is considered academic dishonesty or academic fraud. Plagiarism is the equivalent of cheating in an examination and will result in the immediate failure of your work. Plagiarism applies not only to words but also the use of someone else’s original ideas, statistics, charts, diagrams/images or art work. It also includes material you discover on the World Wide Web.


What s plagiarism contd

What’s plagiarism?Contd…

  • Plagiarism is using others’ ideas and words without clearly acknowledging the source of that information.

    • To avoid plagiarism, you must give credit whenever you use:

  • another person’s idea, opinion, or theory;

  • any facts, statistics, graphs, drawings—any pieces of information—that are not common knowledge;

  • quotations of another person’s actual spoken or written words; or

  • paraphrase of another person’s spoken or written words.


Plagiarism2

Plagiarism

10/20/2014


Plagiarism3

Plagiarism

10/20/2014


Techniques for avoiding plagiarism

Techniques for Avoiding Plagiarism

  • Quotation mark(Parenthetical

  • References)

  • Paraphrase

  • Summarize

  • Bibliography


What s the difference

What’s the difference?

  • Quotations: Put in quotationseverything that comes directly from the text especially when taking notes. “..”Example: According to Peter S. Pritchard in USA Today, “Public schools need reform but they’re irreplaceable in teaching all the nation’s young” (14).

  • Paraphrasing: involves putting a passage from source material into your own words. A paraphrase must also be attributed to the original source. Paraphrased material is usually shorter than the original passage, taking a somewhat broader segment of the source and condensing it slightly.

  • Summarizing :involves putting the main idea(s) into your own words, including only the main point(s). Once again, it is necessary to attribute summarized ideas to the original source. Summaries are significantly shorter than the original and take a broad overview of the source material.


Example

Example

  • Parenthetical reference/In-text Citation :Including a signal phrase which gives the author’s name and page no

  • (Smith and Jones135-137)

  • He states, “anything takes on a new meaning when we think of it as a monument”(Boorstin215) and adds that monuments can be both man-made and natural.

  • Freud states that “ a dream is the fulfillment of a wish”(154)

  • Some argue that “ a dream is the fulfillment of a wish”(Freud 154)


Strategies for avoiding plagiarism

Strategies for Avoiding Plagiarism

10/20/2014


Bibliographic citation

BIBLIOGRAPHIC CITATION


Strategies for avoiding plagiarism1

Strategies for Avoiding Plagiarism

  • Put in quotationseverything that comes directly from the text especially when taking notes. “..”Example: According to Peter S. Pritchard in USA Today, “Public schools need reform but they’re irreplaceable in teaching all the nation’s young” (14).

  • 2. Paraphrase, but be sure you are not just rearranging or replacing a few words. Instead, read over what you want to paraphrase carefully; cover up the text with your hand, or close the text so you can’t see any of it (and so aren’t tempted to use the text as a “guide”). Write out the idea in your own words without peeking.

  • 3. Check your paraphraseagainst the original text to be sure you have not accidentally used the same phrases or words, and that the information is accurate.


Strategies for avoiding plagiarism2

Strategies for avoiding plagiarism

  • Give credit to another person’s idea, opinion, or theory;

  • Mention the source of any facts, statistics, graphs, drawings—any pieces of

  • information that are not common knowledge;

  • quotations mark of another person’s actual spoken or written words; or “….”

  • paraphrase of another person’s spoken or written words.

  • When citing published works, the author's name and the year of publication should be

  • given in the text in one of the following forms:

  • Smith (2005) or Smith and Jones (2005)or Smith et al. (2005) if many authors or (Smith, 2005) if this fits the sentence better

  • If you are citing an article without a personal author, use the journal name (see example of "News item with no by-line", below) or corporate author and the year of publication e.g.

  • Economist (2003) AOL Time Warner (2004)British Broadcasting Corporation (2004)


Citation example 1

Citation Example 1

He states, “anything takes on a new meaning when we think of it as a monument”(Boorstin, 1987, p. 215) and adds that monuments can be both man-made and natural.

Note punctuation

What makes this sentence elegant or unique? The sentence has both adirect quotation and aparaphrase!


How to recognize unacceptable and acceptable paraphrases

How to Recognize Unacceptable and Acceptable Paraphrases

Here’s the ORIGINAL text, from page 1 of Lizzie Borden: A Case Book of Family and Crime in the 1890s by Joyce Williams et al.:

The rise of industry, the growth of cities, and the expansion of the population were the three great developments of late nineteenth century American history. As new, larger, steam-powered factories became a feature of the American landscape in the East, they transformed farm hands into industrial laborers, and provided jobs for a rising tide of immigrants. With industry came urbanization the growth of large cities (like Fall River, Massachusetts, where the Borden's lived) which became the centers of production as well as of commerce and trade. Here is Plagiarised Text

“The increase of industry, the growth of cities, and the explosionof the population were three large factors of nineteenth century America. Assteam-driven companies became more visible in the eastern part of the country, they changed farm hands into factory workers and provide jobs for the large wave of immigrants. With industry came the growth of large cities like Fall River where the Borden’s lived which turned into centers of commerce and trade as well as production”.


How to recognize unacceptable and acceptable paraphrases1

How to Recognize Unacceptable and Acceptable Paraphrases

  • What makes this passage plagiarism?

  • The preceding passage is considered plagiarism for two reasons:

  • the writer has only changed around a few

  • words and phrases, or changed the order

  • of the original’s sentences.

  • the writer has failed to cite a source for

  • any of the ideas or facts.


How to recognize unacceptable and acceptable paraphrases2

How to Recognize Unacceptable and Acceptable Paraphrases

Here’s an ACCEPTABLE paraphrase:

Fall River, where the Borden family lived, was typical of north eastern industrial cities of the nineteenth century. Steam-powered production had shifted labor from agriculture to manufacturing, and as immigrants arrived in the US, they found work in these new factories. As a result, populations grew, and large urban areas arose. Fall River was one of these manufacturing and commercial centers (Williams 1).


How to recognize unacceptable and acceptable paraphrases3

  • Why is this passage acceptable?

  • This is acceptable paraphrasing because the writer:

  • lets her reader know the source of her

  • information.

  • accurately relays the information in the

  • original and uses her own words.

How to Recognize Unacceptable and Acceptable Paraphrases


How to recognize unacceptable and acceptable paraphrases4

How to Recognize Unacceptable and Acceptable Paraphrases

  • Here’s an example of quotation and paraphrase used

  • together, which is also ACCEPTABLE:

  • Fall River, where the Borden family lived, was typical of northeastern industrial cities of the nineteenth century. As steam-powered production shifted labor from agriculture to manufacturing, the demand for workers "transformed farm hands into industrial laborers," and created jobs for immigrants. In turn, growing populations increased the size of urban areas. Fall River was one of these hubs "which became the centers of production as well as of commerce and trade" (Williams 1).


How to recognize unacceptable and acceptable paraphrases5

How to Recognize Unacceptable and Acceptable Paraphrases

  • Why is this passage acceptable?

  • records the information in the

  • original passage accurately.

  • gives credit for the ideas in this

  • passage. indicates which part is

  • taken directly from her source by

  • putting the passage in quotation

  • marks and citing the page number.


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