2012 district lesson seven principles of healthy housing gina peek
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2012 District Lesson Seven Principles of Healthy Housing Gina Peek. Importance. “The connection between health and dwelling is one of the most important that exists.” Florence Nightingale. What is a healthy home?. CECP Core Competencies: HOUSING & ENVIRONMENT.

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2012 District Lesson Seven Principles of Healthy Housing Gina Peek

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2012 district lesson seven principles of healthy housing gina peek

2012 District LessonSeven Principles of Healthy HousingGina Peek


Importance

Importance

“The connection between health and dwelling is one of the most important that exists.”

Florence Nightingale


What is a healthy home

What is a healthy home?


Cecp core competencies housing environment

CECP Core Competencies: HOUSING & ENVIRONMENT

  • Cooperative Extension Curriculum Project:

  • “The initial focus is curriculum for professional development competencies. The intent of the project is to increase the breadth and quality of training while using human and financial resources more efficiently.”

  • These are just some essential concepts that apply to healthy housing.

  • Housing acquisition

  • Housing maintenance and care

  • Household cleaning

  • Home safety and accessibility

  • Indoor air quality: General

http://srpln.msstate.edu/cecp/resources/core_fcs.htm


Why do we care

Why do we care?

In the United States, most people spend 90% of their time indoors.


Why do we care1

Why do we care?

  • According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention…

  • Asthma: Number of visits (to physician offices, hospital outpatient and emergency departments) with asthma as primary diagnosis: 17.0 million. Important asthma triggers are often found in home (ex. Second hand smoke, dust mites, cockroach allergens, pets, mold).

  • Lead poisoning: Approximately 250,000 U.S. children aged 1-5 years have blood lead levels greater than 10 micrograms of lead per deciliter of blood. New level of concern: 5 micrograms

  • Secondhand smoke: Contains more than 7,000chemicals. Hundreds are toxic and about 70 can cause cancer.


Why do we care2

Why do we care?

  • “Of all nonfatal unintentional injury events,

    • 42 percent occur in the home, translating to nearly 12 million nonfatal home injuries each year.

    • In addition, emergency departments treat more than 10 million home injuries annually,

    • And an average of 11 million home injuries are seen by a private physician.

    • In total, unintentional home injuries account for nearly 21 million medical visits on average each year.”


What do we care

What do we care?

  • According to the Home Safety Council’s report “The State of Home Safety in America”

  • “Falls alone account for one-third of all unintentional home injury deaths,

  • More than 40 percent of all nonfatal home injuries,

  • And more than one-third of all injuries resulting in an emergency department visit.”


Why do we care3

Why do we care?

  • According to the 2007 American Housing Survey, six million households live with moderate or severe physical housing problems.

  • Who are the vulnerable populations?


Seven steps to a healthy home

Seven Steps to a healthy home

  • Keep it Dry

  • Keep it Clean

  • Keep it Safe

  • Keep it Well-Ventilated

  • Keep it Pest-free

  • Keep it Contaminant-free

  • Keep it Well-maintained

*This obviously is not a healthy home. Sometimes, you have to be a detective to figure out what is not healthy!


Healthy homes leader lessons

Healthy homes leader lessons

  • We can use knowledge about home environments

  • in a practical way to solve problems

  • 15 minute leader lessons

  • Total of seven presentations

  • Each presentation geared to one of the healthy homes concepts

  • Healthy homes tool and hands on activity


Basic references

Basic References

  • Runyan, C. W., & Casteel, C. (Eds.). (2004). State of home safety in America. Washington, DC: Home Safety Council.

  • US Department of Housing and Urban Development (n.d.-a). Help yourself to a healthy home. Retrieved Summer, 2012, from http://www.hud.gov/offices/lead/library/hhi/HYHH_Booklet.pdf

  • US Department of Housing and Urban Development (n.d.-b). Seven tips for keeping a healthy home. Retrieved Summer, 2012, from http://www.hud.gov/offices/lead/library/hhi/HealthyHomes7Steps.pdf


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