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The Statement of Cash Flows Chapter 12 Objective 1 Identify the purposes of the statement of cash flows. Basic Concepts Reports the entity’s cash flows (cash receipts and cash payments) during the period Purposes of the Statement of Cash Flows Predict future cash flows

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The statement of cash flows l.jpg

The Statement of Cash Flows

Chapter 12


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Objective 1

Identify the purposes of the statement of cash flows.


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Basic Concepts

  • Reports the entity’s cash flows (cash receipts and cash payments) during the period


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Purposes of the Statementof Cash Flows

  • Predict future cash flows

  • Evaluate management decisions

  • Determine the ability to pay dividends to stockholders’ and payments to creditors

  • Show the relationship of net income to the business’s cash flows


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What is Cash?

  • Cash on hand

  • Cash in the bank

  • Cash equivalents - highly liquid, short-term investments that can be converted into cash with little delay

    • Money-market investments

    • U.S. Government Treasury bills


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Objective 2

Distinguish among operating, investing, and financing cash flows.


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Operating, Investing, and Financing Activities

  • Operating activities create revenues, expenses, gains, and losses.

  • Investing activities increase and decrease long-term assets.

  • Financing activities obtain cash from investors and creditors.


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Two Formats forOperating Activities

  • Indirect method reconciles from net income to net cash provided by operating activities

  • Direct method reports all cash receipts and cash payments from operating activities

  • The two methods have no effect on investing or financing activities.


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Indirect Method

Net income$XXX

Adjustments:

Depreciation, etc. XXX

Net income provided by operating activities$XXX

Direct Method

Collection from customers$XXX

Deductions:

Payment to suppliers, etc. XXX

Net income provided by operating activities$XXX

Two Formats forOperating Activities

©2006 Prentice Hall Business Publishing Financial Accounting, 6/e Harrison/Horngren


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Objective 3

Prepare a statement of cash flows by the indirect method.


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Positive Items

Net income

Depreciation/amortization

Loss on sale of long-term assets

Decreases in current assets other than cash

Increases in current liabilities

Negative Items

Net loss

Gain on sale of long-term assets

Increases in current assets other than cash

Decreases in current liabilities

The Indirect Method:Operating Activities


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Positive Items

Sale of plant assets

Sale of investments that are not cash equivalents

Collections of loans receivable

Negative Items

Acquisition of plant assets

Purchase of investments that are not cash equivalents

Making loans to others

The Indirect Method:Investing Activities


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Positive Items

Issuing stock

Selling treasury stock

Borrowing money

Negative Items

Payment of dividends

Purchase of treasury stock

Payment of principal amounts of debts

The Indirect Method:Financing Activities


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Anchor Corporation – December 31

(In thousands)

20x2

20x1

Inc/dec)

Assets

Current:

Cash

Accounts receivable

Interest receivable

Inventory

Prepaid expenses

Long-term receivable

Plant assets, net

Total

$ 22

93

3

135

8

11

453

$725

$ 42

80

1

138

7

219

$487

$ (20)

13

2

(3)

1

11

234

$238

Comparative Balance Sheets


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Comparative Balance Sheets

Anchor Corporation – December 31

(In thousands)

20x2

20x1

Inc/dec)

Liabilities

Current:

Accounts payable

Salary payable

Accrued liabilities

Long-term debt

Stockholders’ equity

Common stock

Retained earnings

Total

$91

34

1

160

359

110

$725

$ 57

6

3

77

258

86

$487

$ 34

(2)

(2)

83

101

24

$238


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Income Statement

Anchor Corporation

Year Ended December 31, 20x2

(In thousands)

Revenues and gains:

Sales revenue$284

Interest revenue 12

Dividend revenue 9

Gain on sale of plant assets 8

Total revenues and gains$313


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Income Statement

Anchor Corporation

Year Ended December 31, 20x2

(In thousands)

Expenses:

Cost of goods sold$150

Salary and wage expense56

Depreciation expense18

Other operating expense17

Interest expense16

Income tax expense 15

Total expenses$272


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Income Statement

Anchor Corporation

Year Ended December 31, 20x2

(In thousands)

Total revenues and gains$313

Total expenses 272

Net income$ 41


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Statement of Cash Flows(IndirectMethod)

Year Ended December 31, 20x2 (In thousands)

Cash flows from operating activities:

Net Income $41

Adjustments to reconcile net income to

net cash provided by operating activities:

ADepreciation18

BGain on sale of plant(8)

Statement of Cash Flows:Operating Activities

Depreciation does not affect cash, but it decreases net income – add it back in.

Sales of long-term assets are investing

Activities – remove gains from net income.


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Statement of Cash Flows: Operating Activities

Statement of Cash Flows(IndirectMethod)

Year Ended December 31, 20x2 (In thousands)

CIncrease in accounts receivable(13)

CIncrease in interest receivable(2)

CDecrease in inventory3

CIncrease in prepaid expenses(1)

CIncrease in accounts payable34

CDecrease is salary payable(2)

CDecrease in accrued liabilities (2) 27

Net cash provided by operating activities$68


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Changes in Current Asset and Current Liability Accounts – C

1. An increase in a current asset other

than cash indicates a decrease in cash.

2. A decrease in a current asset other

than cash indicates an increase in cash.

3. A decrease in a current liability

indicates a decrease in cash.

4. An increase in a current liability

indicates an increase in cash.


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Statement of Cash Flows(IndirectMethod)

Year Ended December 31, 20x2 (In thousands)

Cash flows from investing activities:

Acquisition of plant assets$(306)

Loan to another company(11)

Proceeds from sale of plant assets 62

Net cash used for investing activities$(255)

Statement of Cash Flows:Investing Activities


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Statement of Cash Flows(IndirectMethod)

Year Ended December 31, 20x2 (In thousands)

Cash flows from financing activities:

Proceeds from issuance of common stock$101

Proceeds from issuance of long-term debt94

Payment of long-term debt(11)

Payment of dividends (17)

Net cash provided by financing activities$167

Statement of Cash Flows:Financing Activities


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Statement of Cash Flows(IndirectMethod)

Year Ended December 31, 20x2 (In thousands)

Net cash provided by operating activities$ 68

Net cash used for investing activities (255)

Net cash provided by financing activities 167

Net decrease in cash$ (20)

Cash balance, December 31, 20x1 42

Cash balance, December 31, 20x2$ 22

Statement of Cash Flows


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Computing Acquisition andSales of Plant Assets

  • Anchor had plant assets, net of depreciation, of $219,000 at the beginning of the year and $453,000 at year end. The acquisition of plant assets amounted to $306,000 during the year.


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Computing Acquisition andSales of Plant Assets

The income statement shows depreciation expense of $18,000 and an $8,000 gain on sale of plant assets. What is the book value of the assets sold?

Beginning balance + Acquisitions – Depreciation

– Book value of assets sold = Ending balance


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Computing Acquisition andSales of Plant Assets

$219,000 + 306,000 – 18,000 – X= $453,000

X = $219,000 + 306,000 – 18,000 – 453,000

X = $54,000 (book value)

How much are the proceeds

from the sale of plant assets?


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Computing Acquisition andSales of Plant Assets

Book value + Gain – Loss = Sale proceeds

$54,000 + $8,000 – 0 = $62,000


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Computing Acquisition andSales of Plant Assets

Plant Assets (Net)

Beginning bal. 219,000

Acquisitions 306,000

Ending bal. 453,000

Depreciation18,000

Book val.54,000

©2006 Prentice Hall Business Publishing Financial Accounting, 6/e Harrison/Horngren


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Computing Acquisition andSales of Investments

Beginning balance + Purchases

– Book value of investment sold

= Ending balance


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Computing Loans andTheir Collections

Beginning balance + New loans made

– Collections

= Ending balance


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Computing Issuances and Payments of Long-Term Debt

Beginning balance was $77,000.

New debt amounting to $94,000

was incurred during the year.

The ending balance for the Long-Term

Debt account was $160,000.

How much was the payment?


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Computing Issuances and Payments of Long-Term Debt

Long-Term Debt

Payments11,000

Beginning bal. 77,000

New debt 94,000

Ending bal. 160,000

©2006 Prentice Hall Business Publishing Financial Accounting, 6/e Harrison/Horngren


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Computing Issuances of Stock: Purchases of Treasury Stock

Beginning balance of common stock +

Issuance of newstock = Ending balance

Beginning balance of treasury stock +

Purchase of treasury stock = Ending balance


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Computing Dividend Payments

Retained earnings beginning balance +

Net income – Dividends declared

= Ending balance

$86,000 + $41,000 – X = $110,000

X = $110,000 – $86,000 – $41,000

X = $17,000


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Noncash Investing andFinancing Activities

Suppose Anchor Corporation issued

Common stock valued at $300,000

to acquire a warehouse.

Warehouse Building300,000

Common Stock300,000


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Noncash Investing andFinancing Activities

Noncash Investing and Financing Activities:(000)

Acquisition of building by issuing common stock$300

Acquisition of land by issuing note payable 70

Payment of long-term debt by issuing

common stock100

Total noncash investing and financing activities$470

©2006 Prentice Hall Business Publishing Financial Accounting, 6/e Harrison/Horngren


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Learning Objective 4

Prepare a statement of cash flows by the direct method.


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The Direct Method

  • The FASB has expressed a preference for the direct method

  • Provides clearer information about the sources and uses of a company’s operating cash


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The Direct Method

Statement of Cash Flows

Year Ended December 31, 20x2

(In thousands)

Cash flows from operating activities:

Receipts:

Collections from customers$271

Interest received on notes receivable10

Dividends received on investments in stock 9

Total cash receipts$290


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The Direct Method

Statement of Cash Flows

Year Ended December 31, 20x2

(In thousands)

Payments:

To suppliers$133

To employees58

For interest16

For income tax 15

Total payments 222

Net cash provided by operating activities $ 68


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The Direct Method

Statement of Cash Flows

Year Ended December 31, 20x2 (In thousands)

Net cash provided by operating activities$ 68

Net cash used for investing activities(255)

Net cash provided by financing activities 167

Net decrease in cash$(20)

Cash balance, December 31, 20x1 42

Cash balance, December 31, 20x2$ 22

©2006 Prentice Hall Business Publishing Financial Accounting, 6/e Harrison/Horngren


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Cash Flows fromOperating Activities

  • Cash collections from customers

  • Cash receipts of interest

  • Cash receipts of dividends

  • Payments to suppliers

  • Payments to employees

  • Payments for interest and income tax expense


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Cash Flows fromInvesting Activities

  • Purchases of plant assets; investments in, and loans to, other companies

  • Proceeds from the sale of plant assets and investments; and the collections of loans


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Cash Flows fromFinancing Activities

  • Proceeds from the issuance of stock and debt

  • Payment of debt and purchases of the company’s own stock

  • Payment of cash dividends


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Computing Cash Collectionsfrom Customers

Beginning accounts receivable balance

+ Sales on account – Collections

= Ending accounts receivable balance


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Computing Paymentsto Suppliers

Step 1: How much were the purchases?

Beginning inventory + Purchases – Cost of goods sold = Ending Inventory

$138,000 + X – $150,000 = $135,000

X = $150,000 – $138,000 + $135,000

X = $147,000


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Computing Paymentsto Suppliers

Accounts Payable

Payments for inventory

Beg. balance 57,000

Purchases147,000

End. balance 91,000


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Computing Paymentsto Suppliers

Step 2: How much did the business pay for this inventory?

Beginning Accounts Payable + Purchases – Payments = Ending Accounts Payable

$57,000 + $147,000 – X = $91,000

X = $57,000 + $147,000 – $91,000

X = $113,000


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Computing Payments forOperating Expenses

Beginning prepaid expense + Payments

– Expiration of prepaid expense

= Ending balance

Beginning accrued liabilities + Accrual of

expense at year end – Payments

= Ending balance

Accrual of other operating expenses at year end

+ Expiration of prepaid expense + Payments

= Ending balance


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Computing Payments to Employees

Salary Payable was $6,000 at the beginning of the year and $4,000 at year end. During the year, Salary Expense was $56,000. How much did the business pay?

$58,000


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Measuring Cash Adequacy:Free Cash Flow

  • The amount of cash available from operations after paying for planned investments in plant, equipment, and other long-term assets.

Net cash flow from operating activities

Cash outflow earmarked for investments in

plant, equipment, and other long-term assets


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End of Chapter 12


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