Educational challenges and opportunities for foster children and youth
Download
1 / 19

Educational Challenges, and Opportunities, for Foster Children and Youth - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 101 Views
  • Uploaded on

Educational Challenges, and Opportunities, for Foster Children and Youth. Mark E. Courtney, Ph.D. POC Executive Director Ballmer Chair in Child Well-Being School of Social Work University of Washington. Acknowledging Needs & Strengthening Systems.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Educational Challenges, and Opportunities, for Foster Children and Youth' - libitha


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Educational challenges and opportunities for foster children and youth

Educational Challenges, and Opportunities, for Foster Children and Youth

Mark E. Courtney, Ph.D.

POC Executive Director

Ballmer Chair in Child Well-Being

School of Social Work

University of Washington


Acknowledging needs strengthening systems
Acknowledging Needs & Strengthening Systems Children and Youth

  • Adoption and Safe Families Act – new emphasis on child well-being

  • Child welfare system still the “long-term parent” for many abused and neglected children

  • Educational status a critical aspect of foster children’s well-being


Some basic information on children in care
Some Basic Information on Children in Care Children and Youth

  • 27% in care are 5 years or under; 51% 10 or under

  • 40% entering are 5 years or under; 60% 10 or under

  • 46% in foster family home; 23% kinship care; 20% group care

  • About 2/3 go home and most of these within the first 18 months

  • Age matters in terms of permanency outcomes

  • 27% in care are 5 years or under; 51% 10 or under

  • 40% entering are 5 years or under; 60% 10 or under

  • 46% in foster family home; 23% kinship care; 20% group care

  • About 2/3 go home and most of these within the first 18 months

  • Age matters in terms of permanency outcomes


Background on the studies
Background on the Studies Children and Youth

  • Work in Chicago begun in 2002 as part of the Chicago Public Schools (CPS) Student Development Planning Initiative

  • Continued as part of broader research program for the Illinois child welfare agency

  • Included both quantitative (approx. 5500 foster children in CPS) and qualitative research

  • The Midwest Evaluation of the Adult Functioning of Former Foster Youth

  • Foster youth in 3 states (n = 732) who were in out-of-home care at age 17, had entered care before their 16th birthday, and had been placed in care due to abuse and/or neglect

  • Interviews at ages 17-18, 19, and 21


Chicago falling behind early never catching up
Chicago: Falling Behind Early, Never Catching Up Children and Youth

  • Twice as likely as other CPS students to be at least a year old for their grade

  • Trauma prior to placement >>> to educational delays

  • More likely to be retained in school in the year immediately following placement in care


Special education the most appropriate response
Special Education: The Most Appropriate Response? Children and Youth

  • More likely than other Chicago Public School students to be classified as learning disabled

  • More likely to have been placed in special education at least once

  • Behavioral problems >>> erroneous labeling of children as emotionally or behaviorally disordered?

  • Might remediation of educational deficits be more appropriate, in some cases, than special education?

  • Don’t confuse behavior associated with the transition to care with emotional disability


Changes in placement changes in schools
Changes in Placement, Changes in Schools Children and Youth

  • School mobility rates highest for those entering care for the first time

  • 40% of foster children who moved once and 66% of those who moved twice also switched schools during academic year

  • Over 80 percent of children changing schools attended a school within 5 miles of the school they left


Educational consequences of school mobility for children
Educational Consequences of School Mobility for Children Children and Youth

  • Disrupted educational instruction and social relationships

  • Delays in transfers of important school records

  • Delays in access to important special or supplemental educational services


The challenge for caseworkers identifying needs
The Challenge for Caseworkers: Identifying Needs Children and Youth

  • Finding an appropriate school

  • Securing special services

  • Motivating youth to stay in school

  • Helping prepare for and choose among post-secondary education options


The challenge for caseworkers knowing the schools
The Challenge for Caseworkers: Knowing the Schools Children and Youth

  • Forming sustained, professional relationships between caseworkers and educators

  • Building familiarity with school processes and procedures


The challenge for caseworkers identifying needs and knowing the schools
The Challenge for Caseworkers: Identifying Needs and Knowing the Schools

  • 45% of Illinois foster children had 2+ caseworkers (2003)

  • Caseloads distributed among many different schools and districts

  • High caseworker turnover


The midwest study educational status at baseline 17 18
The Midwest Study: the SchoolsEducational Status at Baseline (17-18)

  • Enrolled in School: 695 (94.9%)

  • Type of School:

    • High School - 588 (80.3%)

    • Vocational School - 14 (1.9%)

    • College - 46 (6.3%)

    • Other - 47 (6.4%)

  • Special Education: 347 (47.3%) Add Health

  • Repeated a Grade: 272 (37.2%) 21.5%

  • Out of School Suspension: 489 (66.8%) 27.8%

  • Expelled from School: 121 (16.5%) 4.6%

  • Median Grade Equivalent Reading Score (WRAT-3): 7th Grade



Educational attainment at 19
Educational Attainment at 19 to Wave 2 Interview



Predictors of college enrollment at age 19
Predictors of College Enrollment at Age 19 to Wave 2 Interview

Estimated Effect

Variableon Odds

Caregiver problems 1.25

Delinquency .60

Retained a grade .51

Expects to complete college 1.93

Still in care at 19 2.84

2+ moves .34

2+ moves and still in care 6.36



Lessons for practice with transition age youth
Lessons for Practice with Transition-Age Youth to Wave 2 Interview

  • Service providers and the courts must take into account that many foster youth are not prepared to make the transition to independence at age 18

  • Most young people appear to value and benefit from their connections to the child welfare system

  • Educational deficits in high school (old for grade) are strongly related to the educational trajectory

  • Externalizing behavior problems affect the educational trajectory…we need to better address emotional/behavioral problems of foster youth

  • Aspirations matter (over 70 of youth report wanting to graduate from college and nearly as many expect to do so; no change over time in these aspirations and expectations)


Resources
Resources to Wave 2 Interview

  • Educational Experiences of Children in Out-of-Home Care (2004). Cheryl Smithgall, Robert Matthew Gladden, Eboni Howard, Robert M. Goerge, Mark E. Courtney: http://www.chapinhall.org/article_abstract.aspx?ar=1372

  • Midwest Evaluation of the Adult Functioning of Former Foster Youth (2005). Mark E. Courtney, Amy Dworsky, Sherri Terao, Noel Bost, Gretchen Ruth Cusick, Thomas Keller, Judy Havlicek: http://www.chapinhall.org/article_abstract.aspx?ar=1355


ad